??? About PCI Express vs AGP

I am getting ready to build a new system. It has been a while since I've done this. When I started looking at mobos and cpus I see some boards are listed with pci express and others with the older AGP technology. I am a novice at building systems. My questions is, are the pci express boards compatable with the AGP cards or do u have to go with one format or the other? I assume they are not compatable?

Where can I find some articles/documentation that would give me a good review of the two?
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  1. There are a small number of boards available with both AGP and PCIe.

    I would recommend going with PCIe unless you are trying to build an ultra-cheap system based on older components. Basically what you are looking at is the interface for the graphics card. Eventually, all graphics cards will only be available on PCIe as it was designed to be a replacement for AGP. Most decent graphics cards are either only available for PCIe or are much cheaper in the PCIe version that the AGP version.

    Let me know if this isn't clear to you.
  2. Quote:

    Where can I find some articles/documentation that would give me a good review of the two?


    Since there is so much information out there, it's best if you just google agp vs pcie and pick and choose what you want to read. If you've been out of the "build arena" for awhile, there have been some pretty big changes the last 2 years. As Scougs pointed out, AGP is now legacy and there isn't much need to build with legacy components unless there is some other reason compelling you to do so. Another big change is the switch to DDR2 as the mainstream memory type for both AMD and Intel. As far as processors go, right now Intel has the performance lead with the Core 2 Duo. What hasn't changed is that there is allways something newer, faster, and better right around the corner.

    My personal opinion is that you should try to build with first (current) generation components. That could easily be second generation tomorrow so if you build with todays second generation then you're at 3rd generation tomorrow (if that makes sense - lol).

    BTW - welcome back into the world of wildly differing opinions and conflicing and contradictory manufacturers' claims!
  3. You cannot mix and match these technologies. PCI-E is the better choice. ASROCK are the motherboard makers which make boards containing AGP and PCI-E slots.

    Quote:
    My personal opinion is that you should try to build with first (current) generation components. That could easily be second generation tomorrow so if you build with todays second generation then you're at 3rd generation tomorrow (if that makes sense - lol).


    Wha?!? :D
  4. dang ... If I wasn't the one who wrote that, I'd be laughing my butt off :oops: . I think you know what I meant.
  5. Are you trying to say that if he builds with todays components that they could be outdated by tomorrow, and if he builds with tomorrows components that they could be outdated by the next day?!?
  6. Quote:
    Are you trying to say that if he builds with todays components that they could be outdated by tomorrow, and if he builds with tomorrows components that they could be outdated by the next day?!?


    If you build with todays components, they will be "old" by tomorrows standards (or in a few weeks/months) as the next latest and greatest thing comes out.

    If you build with components that are just one generation behind today (things like DDR and AGP), it won't be long before it will be extremely difficult to find support for those components. It doesn't necessarily mean that they're not good technology - just hard to find replacements and support.

    Dang ... feel like I've been spanked by the teacher and made to go back and rewrite a report :(
  7. Quote:
    If you build with components that are just one generation behind today (things like DDR and AGP), it won't be long before it will be extremely difficult to find support for those components. It doesn't necessarily mean that they're not good technology - just hard to find replacements and support.


    lol. you should have just said this in the first place! :P
  8. I know, I know .. been a long day :lol:
  9. Quote:
    If you build with components that are just one generation behind today (things like DDR and AGP), it won't be long before it will be extremely difficult to find support for those components. It doesn't necessarily mean that they're not good technology - just hard to find replacements and support.



    lol... It has been that way friom the beginning..... Thanks guys. Appreciate the feedback....
  10. Here's the way it usually works. You start out by considering systems along the lines of the one outlined in this thread: Core 2 Duo Budget System for $631

    Then you start to tweak it ... just a teensy little bit ...

    motherboard >= $200-$300 ... you're not sure what all the features are, but it is the "best" and everyone else likes it ...
    CPU >= minimum of an E6600 ... (Hey! Maybe go with quad-core? Might do some video work some day?)
    memory >= premium DDR2-800 CAS 4 ... because if you spend 50% more on the memory, the system will run 50% faster, right?
    graphics >= NVIDIA 8800 whatever ... (Hey! Why not get 2 for SLI?)
    1000w top-of-the-line PSU ... because you'd be an idiot to skimp on the PSU!

    and before you know it you're placing a $1500-$2500 order with newegg. But you can at least take comfort that you didn't blow a lot of money on the case! Yes, you pragmatically picked out a low-end budget case and saved money. No wasteful, extravagant spending for you! :roll: :)

    A simple yet apparently all too inevitable process.

    Me I'm going to get an E4300, a Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3 rev 3.3, probably the 2GB Corsair DDR2-800 CAS 5 kit, and, my extravagance, an EVGA NVIDIA 7600GT. Just waiting a bit at the moment for the wheels of inventory to do another turn or so for "good measure".

    And after I get it and build it, I'll blink and be out of date again. So it goes.

    -john, the really, truly, positively out-of-date legacy dinosaur
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