Plasma TV repair

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Need some opinions from some plasma monitor tech experts...

I just bought a 50" plasma monitor and had it shipped to my residence.
Unfortunately, when it arrived, the interior glass screen (the actual plasma
screen, I presume) was shattered; the exterior screen glass was intact and
undamaged. I insured the delivery, so that's not an issue. However, since
the item was a close-out at my particular retailer, there's no chance I can
get a replacement at the same price elsewhere.

Here's my question --- assuming that the shipping insurance carrier doesn't
want the unit after they pay my claim, would it be worth repairing (or CAN
it be repaired)? I have no doubt that it would cost a LOT, but if I end up
with a working plasma for less than I paid for the unit new, it might make
it worthwhile. Obviously, if I could get another new one, I'd opt for that,
but it's not an option. I either repair this one, or keep looking for
another unit but at a much higher price.

Anyone have any thoughts on the repair idea, and possibly what it would
cost?
5 answers Last reply
More about plasma repair
  1. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    The same thought would cross my mind. I thought I would mention that there
    are probably some nasty chemicals inside that display and you should
    probably keep away from that broken set. I know that we have to pay to
    dispose of CRT and LCD monitors because of the toxic heavy metals/chemicals
    in them, I suspect plasmas are similar.

    --Dan


    "Mike" <austinheat@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:10g90dle28ecd9c@corp.supernews.com...
    > Need some opinions from some plasma monitor tech experts...
    >
    > I just bought a 50" plasma monitor and had it shipped to my residence.
    > Unfortunately, when it arrived, the interior glass screen (the actual
    plasma
    > screen, I presume) was shattered; the exterior screen glass was intact and
    > undamaged. I insured the delivery, so that's not an issue. However,
    since
    > the item was a close-out at my particular retailer, there's no chance I
    can
    > get a replacement at the same price elsewhere.
    >
    > Here's my question --- assuming that the shipping insurance carrier
    doesn't
    > want the unit after they pay my claim, would it be worth repairing (or CAN
    > it be repaired)? I have no doubt that it would cost a LOT, but if I end
    up
    > with a working plasma for less than I paid for the unit new, it might make
    > it worthwhile. Obviously, if I could get another new one, I'd opt for
    that,
    > but it's not an option. I either repair this one, or keep looking for
    > another unit but at a much higher price.
    >
    > Anyone have any thoughts on the repair idea, and possibly what it would
    > cost?
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Cost of the repair will exceed 80%& of the original item. Most expensive
    component is the actual glass display unit. IMHO I personally would salvage
    all the circuit boards, package and label them appropriately, and purchase
    another similar model: thereby having your own stock of repair parts when
    you require them. The gasses within the display will have already dissipated
    into the atmosphere, the phosphor coating, etc will have to be delt with via
    appropriate disposal routines, either at the local refuse or recycling
    centre. A quick phone call to your community will assure you of proper
    disposal routine to follow. Good luck in having the carrier refund 100% of
    the cost including shipping fees.
    "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:8e0Nc.2561$AY5.2410@newssvr21.news.prodigy.com...
    > The same thought would cross my mind. I thought I would mention that
    there
    > are probably some nasty chemicals inside that display and you should
    > probably keep away from that broken set. I know that we have to pay to
    > dispose of CRT and LCD monitors because of the toxic heavy
    metals/chemicals
    > in them, I suspect plasmas are similar.
    >
    > --Dan
    >
    >
    > "Mike" <austinheat@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:10g90dle28ecd9c@corp.supernews.com...
    > > Need some opinions from some plasma monitor tech experts...
    > >
    > > I just bought a 50" plasma monitor and had it shipped to my residence.
    > > Unfortunately, when it arrived, the interior glass screen (the actual
    > plasma
    > > screen, I presume) was shattered; the exterior screen glass was intact
    and
    > > undamaged. I insured the delivery, so that's not an issue. However,
    > since
    > > the item was a close-out at my particular retailer, there's no chance I
    > can
    > > get a replacement at the same price elsewhere.
    > >
    > > Here's my question --- assuming that the shipping insurance carrier
    > doesn't
    > > want the unit after they pay my claim, would it be worth repairing (or
    CAN
    > > it be repaired)? I have no doubt that it would cost a LOT, but if I end

    > up
    > > with a working plasma for less than I paid for the unit new, it might
    make
    > > it worthwhile. Obviously, if I could get another new one, I'd opt for
    > that,
    > > but it's not an option. I either repair this one, or keep looking for
    > > another unit but at a much higher price.
    > >
    > > Anyone have any thoughts on the repair idea, and possibly what it would
    > > cost?
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    In article <10g90dle28ecd9c@corp.supernews.com> "Mike"
    <austinheat@hotmail.com> writes:

    >Need some opinions from some plasma monitor tech experts...

    I don't know if owning 80 of them qualifies as expert, however...

    My advice would be to cut your losses and get on with your life. While
    salvage value would be minimal, these things are extremely expensive to
    repair. Our own experience with having them repaired is that the repairs
    don't last and so you find yourself flushing good money after bad. If the
    model has been discontinued, the circuit boards (presumably undamaged)
    would also be of little or value to you. Forget the salvage. Concentrate
    instead on getting your money from the carrier. Good luck.


    --
    Lucidity Paradox: Explain a concept in sufficient detail, and it will
    become clearer and clearer until it eventually disappears.
  4. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    >Here's my question --- assuming that the shipping insurance carrier doesn't
    >want the unit after they pay my claim, would it be worth repairing (or CAN
    >it be repaired)? I have no doubt that it would cost a LOT, but if I end up
    >with a working plasma for less than I paid for the unit new, it might make
    >it worthwhile. Obviously, if I could get another new one, I'd opt for that,
    >but it's not an option. I either repair this one, or keep looking for
    >another unit but at a much higher price.

    Nobody I know actually repairs a plasma in that condition. I really think
    you're better off getting your money back.
  5. Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

    Cost of the physical display will cost you almost as much as the new unit.
    Also many manufactureres will not sell just the display as a repair part,
    specifically because of the problems in shipping and handling you have
    already encountered. If you do opp to thve it repaired the best way would be
    to ship it back to the manufacturer and have them do the actual repair of
    the item, eventually paying them twice for the product.

    "Vidguy7" <vidguy7@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:20040726192123.04176.00001485@mb-m26.aol.com...
    > >Here's my question --- assuming that the shipping insurance carrier
    doesn't
    > >want the unit after they pay my claim, would it be worth repairing (or
    CAN
    > >it be repaired)? I have no doubt that it would cost a LOT, but if I end
    up
    > >with a working plasma for less than I paid for the unit new, it might
    make
    > >it worthwhile. Obviously, if I could get another new one, I'd opt for
    that,
    > >but it's not an option. I either repair this one, or keep looking for
    > >another unit but at a much higher price.
    >
    > Nobody I know actually repairs a plasma in that condition. I really think
    > you're better off getting your money back.
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