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LG DLP (was: Re: 55" Mitsubishi RPTV)

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Anonymous
July 29, 2004 12:24:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Ok, so I'm sold on the mits, and am just waiting two weeks for my
local vendor to have the new models on the floor. I go there today to
look around and kill some time while I wait for my wife to get off
work, and I see the 44" and 52" LG DLP models. I am impressed with the
technology for the price, and the picture was in some ways better and
in some ways not as good as the CRT mits.

I would be really interested in hearing some opinions for or against
these tvs. At this point I want the new medallion mits 55" or the 52"
LG DLP, and any help into steering me to the best choice will be
appreciated.

More about : dlp mitsubishi rptv

Anonymous
July 29, 2004 11:10:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Michael Lankton" <mlankton@mchsi.com> wrote in message
news:40e8b9cf.0407281924.7eca764c@posting.google.com...
> Ok, so I'm sold on the mits, and am just waiting two weeks for my
> local vendor to have the new models on the floor. I go there today to
> look around and kill some time while I wait for my wife to get off
> work, and I see the 44" and 52" LG DLP models. I am impressed with the
> technology for the price, and the picture was in some ways better and
> in some ways not as good as the CRT mits.
>
> I would be really interested in hearing some opinions for or against
> these tvs. At this point I want the new medallion mits 55" or the 52"
> LG DLP, and any help into steering me to the best choice will be
> appreciated.

The first thing is the weight of the two units - - the DLP is quite often
fairly light compared to CRT units. Some makes of DLP now have quite good
contrast ratios, but I'm not sure about the LG brand - - I would expect it
to be similar to what Samsung and RCA are offering. I owned a Samsung unit
for a few days early in '03 before replacing it with an LCD RPTV. I liked
the matte screen on the DLP which produced absolutely no reflection of lamps
around the room. When they want to protect the screen better, it usually
entails some glass, and the reflections can be very troublesome, requiring
some fancy coatings (such as on my Sony GWII). Then we get down to the
picture. I hear recent DLP chips operate with intensity resolution of 10
bits, which probably improves greatly the rendering of dim pictures after
the peak intensity of the picture is turned down so it's compatible with
evening room illumination. The one I had for a short time used 8 bits, I
believe, and after throwing away 1/2 or 3/4 of the information to control
the peak intensity of the picture, subtle skin tones took on a flattened,
stepped appearance, which I felt was totally unacceptable - - the main
reason for returning it. Then there's the sequential color situation where
the light from the DLP chip is run through a rotating color filter wheel.
Lets say you're watching a mystery program, and there's a bright street
light in a mostly dim or black scene. If you move your eyes rapidly to
various places in the screen, the streetlight will leave a momentary RGB
trail in your vision, sometimes called a "rainbow". The effect is fleeting
and quite a few people are never bothered by it, but once you know why it's
there, it's hard to ignore it when it happens. Also, way back 19 months ago
when I had that DLP unit, Samsung just couldn't make a TV that didn't have a
slight green caste to the picture. I understand most are better now, but it
seemed to be a problem back then. Hopefully Samsung along with the other
brands are more careful now how they set up the illumination spectrum. Then
there's the "screen-door" effect. I have always felt that as long as I can
see individual pixels in every place on the screen when I get 6 to 10 inches
away, then the optics are in good focus and I can be confident that I will
see all the detail in a High Definition picture that was put into it.
Recently I came across an ad that touted "no more screen-door effect", which
said to me they put in cheap optics that don't have good enough resolution
to show all the detail, or they defocused the picture to smear the pixels
into each other. Either way, it makes it impossible for the customer to see
that his optics are still sharp and in focus, so maybe he'll be unaware of
defects that might require service. That screen-door-effect disappears
entirely when the set is viewed from the proper distance.

Good luck, and enjoy the set you decide on.

Chuck
Anonymous
July 29, 2004 11:10:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

IMHO: Seeing L/G quality in the Zenith Branded sets I would stay as far away
form their product line as practical. Stay with the original idea of the
MITS or another quality brand, you will be rewarded with a more reliable
product overall.
"Chuck Olson" <chuckolson01@REMOVETHIScomcast.net> wrote in message
news:gYbOc.177112$a24.132895@attbi_s03...
>
> "Michael Lankton" <mlankton@mchsi.com> wrote in message
> news:40e8b9cf.0407281924.7eca764c@posting.google.com...
> > Ok, so I'm sold on the mits, and am just waiting two weeks for my
> > local vendor to have the new models on the floor. I go there today to
> > look around and kill some time while I wait for my wife to get off
> > work, and I see the 44" and 52" LG DLP models. I am impressed with the
> > technology for the price, and the picture was in some ways better and
> > in some ways not as good as the CRT mits.
> >
> > I would be really interested in hearing some opinions for or against
> > these tvs. At this point I want the new medallion mits 55" or the 52"
> > LG DLP, and any help into steering me to the best choice will be
> > appreciated.
>
> The first thing is the weight of the two units - - the DLP is quite often
> fairly light compared to CRT units. Some makes of DLP now have quite good
> contrast ratios, but I'm not sure about the LG brand - - I would expect it
> to be similar to what Samsung and RCA are offering. I owned a Samsung unit
> for a few days early in '03 before replacing it with an LCD RPTV. I liked
> the matte screen on the DLP which produced absolutely no reflection of
lamps
> around the room. When they want to protect the screen better, it usually
> entails some glass, and the reflections can be very troublesome, requiring
> some fancy coatings (such as on my Sony GWII). Then we get down to the
> picture. I hear recent DLP chips operate with intensity resolution of 10
> bits, which probably improves greatly the rendering of dim pictures after
> the peak intensity of the picture is turned down so it's compatible with
> evening room illumination. The one I had for a short time used 8 bits, I
> believe, and after throwing away 1/2 or 3/4 of the information to control
> the peak intensity of the picture, subtle skin tones took on a flattened,
> stepped appearance, which I felt was totally unacceptable - - the main
> reason for returning it. Then there's the sequential color situation where
> the light from the DLP chip is run through a rotating color filter wheel.
> Lets say you're watching a mystery program, and there's a bright street
> light in a mostly dim or black scene. If you move your eyes rapidly to
> various places in the screen, the streetlight will leave a momentary RGB
> trail in your vision, sometimes called a "rainbow". The effect is fleeting
> and quite a few people are never bothered by it, but once you know why
it's
> there, it's hard to ignore it when it happens. Also, way back 19 months
ago
> when I had that DLP unit, Samsung just couldn't make a TV that didn't have
a
> slight green caste to the picture. I understand most are better now, but
it
> seemed to be a problem back then. Hopefully Samsung along with the other
> brands are more careful now how they set up the illumination spectrum.
Then
> there's the "screen-door" effect. I have always felt that as long as I can
> see individual pixels in every place on the screen when I get 6 to 10
inches
> away, then the optics are in good focus and I can be confident that I will
> see all the detail in a High Definition picture that was put into it.
> Recently I came across an ad that touted "no more screen-door effect",
which
> said to me they put in cheap optics that don't have good enough resolution
> to show all the detail, or they defocused the picture to smear the pixels
> into each other. Either way, it makes it impossible for the customer to
see
> that his optics are still sharp and in focus, so maybe he'll be unaware of
> defects that might require service. That screen-door-effect disappears
> entirely when the set is viewed from the proper distance.
>
> Good luck, and enjoy the set you decide on.
>
> Chuck
>
>
Anonymous
July 30, 2004 12:48:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Art" <plotsligt@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:Zb-dnfqlKvZ-zpTcRVn-qw@comcast.com...
> IMHO: Seeing L/G quality in the Zenith Branded sets I would stay as far
away
> form their product line as practical. Stay with the original idea of the
> MITS or another quality brand, you will be rewarded with a more reliable
> product overall.

I am a big fan of the Mitsubishi products, and their new DLP sets do look
outstanding, but for the past few years the Zenith/LG quality seems to have
become better. The junk under the Zenith name in the 90s seems to have been
improved upon considerably in the last few years. I'd still have trouble
trusting them for a big investment, but what I hear from techs who do lots
of zenith is much better than it once was.

Leonard
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