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Worried my HSF is going to fall off

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February 17, 2007 10:35:31 PM

I finished my first ever build today, and it ran first go! My only worry is that my HSF is going to fall off. I'm using an LGA775 Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro. During installation, the four pin things that are supposed to secure it would keep popping out.

I'd push one side in and the other side would pop out, then I'd push that side in and the other would pop out. The two pins on the top of the mobo seem to be totally secure, but the lower two seem a bit loose. What am I doing wrong?

More about : worried hsf fall

February 17, 2007 10:36:50 PM

And another quick question. The fan on the HSF isn't spinning when I boot up, but as soon as the computer shuts down, it quickly spins for a second or two and then slows down. Obviously it's working, but why isn't it running as soon as I turn it on?
February 18, 2007 1:37:19 AM

Since your hsf is not fully installed, the system may be shutting down due to CPU overheating; perhaps the fan connector is loose or not plugged in right. There is also often a BIOS setting to shut off the computer in case the CPU overheats or the fan is not spinning "fast enough". Your aftermarket Freezer 7 Pro likely spins at lower rpms than the BIOS is comfortable with, so you will have to deactivate that setting in the BIOS.
As for mounting the hsf properly, the 4-pin Intel-designed system is notoriously easy to not-quite-properly install.

First, the bad news:
1) You will need to get some thermal compound, as the compound on the hsf is good for a single install only; the remnant compound needs to be cleaned off the CPU and hsf and replaced with a rice-grain-sized dab of fresh compound on the center of the CPU each time you install the hsf. A tiny syringe of Arctic Silver 5 should only cost $5-7 and will last you for dozens of installs.
2) You will need to take the motherboard out of the case to properly install the hsf, since you need to be able to support the back of the MB as you push through the pins, and to be able to look at the back of the MB to verify that all 4 pins are completely through.

The good news:
1) You recognized the problem and didn't just blunder onward uncaring.
2) It's much easier to install the hsf with the MB out of the case.
This post should help out (start at step 2.5):
http://forumz.tomshardware.com/hardware/modules.php?nam...
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February 18, 2007 2:27:03 AM

I had a similar problem with the stock heat sink on my P4. I couldn't get one of the push down connectors to "click" into place. So I went out and got one that used screws to secure the hsf. My temps are great Im currently at 38C. During load around 48-52c. These temps are from the intel desktop utilities.
February 18, 2007 2:38:45 AM

Thanks a lot for the suggestions, but upon further inspection, I think it's going to be just fine. I've wiggled it around with my thumb applying pressure in all directions and it's just barely budging at all. I'm sure it's secure *enough*. 8)

Ironically, the only thing keeping me from actually booting it up and installing everything is the fact that USB keyboard support is disabled by default. :roll:
February 18, 2007 4:29:33 AM

Quote:
... I'm sure it's secure *enough*. ...

Just be sure to monitor your CPU temps. If you get higher-than-normal temps, it's because it isn't clamped down hard enough. Like I said, the 4-pin Intel method is notorious for that.
February 18, 2007 5:02:37 PM

Quote:
... I'm sure it's secure *enough*. ...

Just be sure to monitor your CPU temps. If you get higher-than-normal temps, it's because it isn't clamped down hard enough. Like I said, the 4-pin Intel method is notorious for that.

Thanks a lot dude, I'll make sure to check that later today (hopefully). :o 
!