Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

cleaning the screen

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
Anonymous
July 30, 2004 6:19:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Just got my Sony hd34s510 and it is AMAZING!!! But my (almost) 2 year
old likes to touch the screen. I have been wiping it with a damp
cloth and wanted to know if that is ok, and is Windex ok if I spray it
on a cloth and then wipe the screen.

Thanks,

Eddie G

More about : cleaning screen

Anonymous
July 30, 2004 10:00:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On a glass screen anything is fine. On a RPTV system, use nothing stronger
than plain water and a soft cotton cloth.

As for the crum-cruncher, we found something that WORKS! A full width
strip of Deep Pile plastic carpet runner turned upside-down (cleats facing
up) will put a halt to any child or animal's travels too close to your
precious entertainment system. You want the deep pile version, about $2 a
foot at Home Depot/Lowes, etc. A narrow strip of it behind couches and
chairs will keep the cat from going back there and sleeping.

Miracle stuff, I promise you!



In article <6799ea2c.0407301319.25cc71d0@posting.google.com>
mickeddie@comcast.net (Eddie G) writes:

>Just got my Sony hd34s510 and it is AMAZING!!! But my (almost) 2 year
>old likes to touch the screen. I have been wiping it with a damp
>cloth and wanted to know if that is ok, and is Windex ok if I spray it
>on a cloth and then wipe the screen.
>
>Thanks,
>
>Eddie G
Anonymous
July 30, 2004 10:13:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Eddie G" <mickeddie@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:6799ea2c.0407301319.25cc71d0@posting.google.com...
> Just got my Sony hd34s510 and it is AMAZING!!! But my (almost) 2 year
> old likes to touch the screen. I have been wiping it with a damp
> cloth and wanted to know if that is ok, and is Windex ok if I spray it
> on a cloth and then wipe the screen.
>
> Thanks,
>
> Eddie G

No problem as long as you don't spray it on the set. We get units all the
time with corrosion on switches and boards from cleaners dripping off the
screen. My favorite cleaner is 409 Glass & Surface, which is mostly
Isopropanol, water, some surfactant, and tends to dry with little residue,
while cutting grease well. It will not harm circuit boards.

Leonard
Related resources
July 31, 2004 8:11:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Mr Fixit" <MrFixit@msn.com> wrote in message
news:aeklg0tgtl3m1a34t2tochf65ojeur9kmc@4ax.com...
> On a glass screen anything is fine. On a RPTV system, use nothing stronger
> than plain water and a soft cotton cloth.
>
> As for the crum-cruncher, we found something that WORKS! A full width
> strip of Deep Pile plastic carpet runner turned upside-down (cleats facing
> up) will put a halt to any child or animal's travels too close to your
> precious entertainment system. You want the deep pile version, about $2 a
> foot at Home Depot/Lowes, etc. A narrow strip of it behind couches and
> chairs will keep the cat from going back there and sleeping.
>
> Miracle stuff, I promise you!
>
>

I like the way you think !!!!! :) 

Duke


>
> In article <6799ea2c.0407301319.25cc71d0@posting.google.com>
> mickeddie@comcast.net (Eddie G) writes:
>
> >Just got my Sony hd34s510 and it is AMAZING!!! But my (almost) 2 year
> >old likes to touch the screen. I have been wiping it with a damp
> >cloth and wanted to know if that is ok, and is Windex ok if I spray it
> >on a cloth and then wipe the screen.
> >
> >Thanks,
> >
> >Eddie G
>
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 12:18:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Until the kiddo starts crying that his feet, hands, etc are hurting?? Yes
it is a deterrent and probably will curb the affection to the front of the
tele. I have always advocated appropriate parental intervention and
corrective action to the child when trying to instruct and train them what
you do not want them to do. Corrective interaction with positive response
from the parents tend to encourage changes your child's actions, and enforce
communication between peers. After having raised six of my own and helping
raise twelve grand children now. That is IMHO. <
>As far as the tele, warm water applied to a soft cleaning cloth, lightly
applied to the protective plastic screen. I have also used materials
specifically designated for cleaning of eye-glasses. BTW many of the
commercial cleaning kits have isopropyl alcohol as their main ingrediant.
"Duke" <sorry@spam.com> wrote in message
news:CZEOc.1158$Hu2.328@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>
> "Mr Fixit" <MrFixit@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:aeklg0tgtl3m1a34t2tochf65ojeur9kmc@4ax.com...
> > On a glass screen anything is fine. On a RPTV system, use nothing
stronger
> > than plain water and a soft cotton cloth.
> >
> > As for the crum-cruncher, we found something that WORKS! A full width
> > strip of Deep Pile plastic carpet runner turned upside-down (cleats
facing
> > up) will put a halt to any child or animal's travels too close to your
> > precious entertainment system. You want the deep pile version, about $2
a
> > foot at Home Depot/Lowes, etc. A narrow strip of it behind couches and
> > chairs will keep the cat from going back there and sleeping.
> >
> > Miracle stuff, I promise you!
> >
> >
>
> I like the way you think !!!!! :) 
>
> Duke
>
>
> >
> > In article <6799ea2c.0407301319.25cc71d0@posting.google.com>
> > mickeddie@comcast.net (Eddie G) writes:
> >
> > >Just got my Sony hd34s510 and it is AMAZING!!! But my (almost) 2 year
> > >old likes to touch the screen. I have been wiping it with a damp
> > >cloth and wanted to know if that is ok, and is Windex ok if I spray it
> > >on a cloth and then wipe the screen.
> > >
> > >Thanks,
> > >
> > >Eddie G
> >
>
>
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 12:34:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> > As for the crum-cruncher, we found something that WORKS! A full width
> > strip of Deep Pile plastic carpet runner turned upside-down (cleats facing
> > up) will put a halt to any child or animal's travels too close to your
> > precious entertainment system. You want the deep pile version, about $2 a
> > foot at Home Depot/Lowes, etc. A narrow strip of it behind couches and
> > chairs will keep the cat from going back there and sleeping.
> >
> > Miracle stuff, I promise you!

But that only works when the kid is bare foot.
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 1:08:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <geKdnaoAg4GQE5bcRVn-tQ@comcast.com> "Art"
<plotsligt@comcast.net> writes:

>Until the kiddo starts crying that his feet, hands, etc are hurting?? Yes
>it is a deterrent and probably will curb the affection to the front of the
>tele.

As the story goes, "the burned child fears the fire". You can talk to the
child until you are blue in the face from loss of breath and the child may
listen or may not. The child may comprehend or the child may not. The
method I propose certainly is not brutal but will work exactly in the same
way as a hot stove. I agree that we should instruct our children and train
them what we do not want them to do, positive reinforcement, etc. Alas
that plan only works with your own children and only then to the extent it
is applied unilaterally without waiver. I'm sorry, but every parent will
tell you that it is not humanly possible to monitor the child's every
movement about the home without micro-managing the child and driving
yourself nuts in the process or confining them in a playpen. The child
must have some reasonable freedom to explore and discover for itself that
mom/dad/etc were right in cautioning them. The "time out" and positive
reinforcement approach you propose also does not address visitors, ie,
someone else's child or playmates. With the plastic cleat "bed of nails"
in front of the entertainment center, the child has not only been taught
what is expected of him/her (with positive reinforcement) but has now also
been taught that indeed there is a penalty associated with disobedience.
The child will remember the latter, I promise you.

If more of today's children were cognizantly aware of the penalties
associated with improper behavior, it would be much easier and less
stressful on parents (and educators) to use the positive reinforcement
methods you (and people of your child-rearing mindset) advocate.

Christian Fundamentalists have been raising model children in loving homes
for centuries. Look around you. If anyone's noticed, the "new methods" the
child psychologists and other crackpots landing the book deals have been
promoting the past few decades aren't achieving nearly the same success
rates.

In this world of ours I have come to realize that there is nothing nicer
than a well-trained dog nor nothing worse than a rude and ill-mannered
child. When it comes to child rearing methods, the Bible works.
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 4:18:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <6799ea2c.0407310734.4f4faa94@posting.google.com>
mickeddie@comcast.net (Eddie G) writes:

>> > As for the crum-cruncher, we found something that WORKS! A full width
>> > strip of Deep Pile plastic carpet runner turned upside-down (cleats facing
>> > up) will put a halt to any child or animal's travels too close to your
>> > precious entertainment system. You want the deep pile version, about $2 a
>> > foot at Home Depot/Lowes, etc. A narrow strip of it behind couches and
>> > chairs will keep the cat from going back there and sleeping.
>> >
>> > Miracle stuff, I promise you!

>But that only works when the kid is bare foot.

Not many small children run around the average house w/shoes on. This also
thwarts the crawlers and curtain climbers. We're sold on it. It really
works, tested and proven!

--
Help Support Satellite Radio!
Your local radio broadcasters through their powerful NAB lobbyiests
are currently pushing a bill through Congress that if passed, would block
the Satellite Radio services from carrying local content (Traffic & Weather)
Please call your elected representatives at (202) 225-3121 and urge them to
Oppose HR 4026. We need your help, please.
<http://www.xmradio.com/grassroots/index.jsp&gt;
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 7:02:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>As the story goes, "the burned child fears the fire". You can talk to the
>child until you are blue in the face from loss of breath and the child may
>listen or may not. The child may comprehend or the child may not. The
>method I propose certainly is not brutal but will work exactly in the same
>way as a hot stove. I agree that we should instruct our children and train
>them what we do not want them to do, positive reinforcement, etc. Alas
>that plan only works with your own children and only then to the extent it
>is applied unilaterally without waiver. I'm sorry, but every parent will
>tell you that it is not humanly possible to monitor the child's every
>movement about the home without micro-managing the child and driving
>yourself nuts in the process or confining them in a playpen. The child
>must have some reasonable freedom to explore and discover for itself that
>mom/dad/etc were right in cautioning them. The "time out" and positive
>reinforcement approach you propose also does not address visitors, ie,
>someone else's child or playmates. With the plastic cleat "bed of nails"
>in front of the entertainment center, the child has not only been taught
>what is expected of him/her (with positive reinforcement) but has now also
>been taught that indeed there is a penalty associated with disobedience.
>The child will remember the latter, I promise you.
>
>If more of today's children were cognizantly aware of the penalties
>associated with improper behavior, it would be much easier and less
>stressful on parents (and educators) to use the positive reinforcement
>methods you (and people of your child-rearing mindset) advocate.
>
>Christian Fundamentalists have been raising model children in loving homes
>for centuries. Look around you. If anyone's noticed, the "new methods" the
>child psychologists and other crackpots landing the book deals have been
>promoting the past few decades aren't achieving nearly the same success
>rates.
>
>In this world of ours I have come to realize that there is nothing nicer
>than a well-trained dog nor nothing worse than a rude and ill-mannered
>child. When it comes to child rearing methods, the Bible works


The bible works and so does common sense. Unfortunately, these days there is
little sense but plenty of complicated remedies that usually end up making
matters worse.

It's like that with the whole weight loss issue. Instead of simply controlling
caloric intake people are bombarded with all these complicated diets and
methods to lose weight. In most cases the burden of responsibility is
transfered away from the person and instead to the type of foods, genetics, and
every other sorry excuse for being overweight.
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 8:33:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Eddie G wrote:
>>> As for the crum-cruncher, we found something that WORKS! A full
>>> width strip of Deep Pile plastic carpet runner turned upside-down
>>> (cleats facing up) will put a halt to any child or animal's travels
>>> too close to your precious entertainment system. You want the deep
>>> pile version, about $2 a foot at Home Depot/Lowes, etc. A narrow
>>> strip of it behind couches and chairs will keep the cat from going
>>> back there and sleeping.
>>>
>>> Miracle stuff, I promise you!
>
> But that only works when the kid is bare foot.

The "Shoes off in the house rule"....
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 8:40:29 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

you could use a taser, too

why do you care where the cat sleeps?


"Mr Fixit" <MrFixit@msn.com> wrote in message
news:aeklg0tgtl3m1a34t2tochf65ojeur9kmc@4ax.com...
> On a glass screen anything is fine. On a RPTV system, use nothing stronger
> than plain water and a soft cotton cloth.
>
> As for the crum-cruncher, we found something that WORKS! A full width
> strip of Deep Pile plastic carpet runner turned upside-down (cleats facing
> up) will put a halt to any child or animal's travels too close to your
> precious entertainment system. You want the deep pile version, about $2 a
> foot at Home Depot/Lowes, etc. A narrow strip of it behind couches and
> chairs will keep the cat from going back there and sleeping.
>
> Miracle stuff, I promise you!
>
>
>
> In article <6799ea2c.0407301319.25cc71d0@posting.google.com>
> mickeddie@comcast.net (Eddie G) writes:
>
> >Just got my Sony hd34s510 and it is AMAZING!!! But my (almost) 2 year
> >old likes to touch the screen. I have been wiping it with a damp
> >cloth and wanted to know if that is ok, and is Windex ok if I spray it
> >on a cloth and then wipe the screen.
> >
> >Thanks,
> >
> >Eddie G
>
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 8:55:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <2n2edvFs0ggiU1@uni-berlin.de> "oscargrouch"
<leeYOURjackVIRGINITYmo@hotmail.com> writes:

>you could use a taser, too

;-))

>why do you care where the cat sleeps?

Because it has long black fur and sheds profusely. When it was still able
to get behind the couch, the whole back of the couch would get almost
solid black w/cat fur. The floor in back of the couch was covered w/cat
fur and upchucked fur balls. Not that it doesn't vomit up fur balls
elsewhere, just that behind the couch was a chore to clean. Now the
problem is solved. The cat sleeps on a sheet that the wife has put over a
bug overstuffed chair. Once a week she takes the sheet outside, shakes it
out the sheet and then launders it.

The wife having the cat is cheaper than getting her blood pressure and
anxiety medication.


--
Help Support Satellite Radio!
Your local radio broadcasters through their powerful NAB lobbyiests
are currently pushing a bill through Congress that if passed, would block
the Satellite Radio services from carrying local content (Traffic & Weather)
Please call your elected representatives at (202) 225-3121 and urge them to
Oppose HR 4026. We need your help, please.
<http://www.xmradio.com/grassroots/index.jsp&gt;
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 11:05:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Mr Fixit wrote:

> bug overstuffed chair.
>

If you have that many bugs, then the cat fur is probably the least of
your problems... ;-)
Anonymous
July 31, 2004 11:05:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Jeff: Shoaf is kind of an uncommon name. You any relation to AL? Last I
knew AL was up somewhere in N. Indiana doing something in electronics. The
Al Shoaf I know would be in his late 50s early 60s & attended Valpo Tech
back in the '60s


--
Help Support Satellite Radio!
Your local radio broadcasters through their powerful NAB lobbyiests
are currently pushing a bill through Congress that if passed, would block
the Satellite Radio services from carrying local content (Traffic & Weather)
Please call your elected representatives at (202) 225-3121 and urge them to
Oppose HR 4026. We need your help, please.
<http://www.xmradio.com/grassroots/index.jsp&gt;
Anonymous
August 1, 2004 12:11:15 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Mr Fixit wrote:

> Jeff: Shoaf is kind of an uncommon name. You any relation to AL? Last I
> knew AL was up somewhere in N. Indiana doing something in electronics. The
> Al Shoaf I know would be in his late 50s early 60s & attended Valpo Tech
> back in the '60s
>
>

Not that I know of - there's several branches of Shoaf that I'm aware
of, two in NC and one in PA. I'm in one of the NC branches. "Shoaf" is
an Americanized version of "Schaff".
Anonymous
August 1, 2004 1:01:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Kinda sorry I posted that thread since now we no longer comment about
cleaning the screen?? Eh, I agree with all the comments regarding child
rearing, et al fin. However the gent still is confused about cleaning the
screen on the tele. Cheers
"Jeff Shoaf" <jeffshoaf@alltel.net> wrote in message
news:9BWOc.316$zC1.148@fe39.usenetserver.com...
> Mr Fixit wrote:
>
> > Jeff: Shoaf is kind of an uncommon name. You any relation to AL? Last I
> > knew AL was up somewhere in N. Indiana doing something in electronics.
The
> > Al Shoaf I know would be in his late 50s early 60s & attended Valpo Tech
> > back in the '60s
> >
> >
>
> Not that I know of - there's several branches of Shoaf that I'm aware
> of, two in NC and one in PA. I'm in one of the NC branches. "Shoaf" is
> an Americanized version of "Schaff".
>
Anonymous
August 1, 2004 1:17:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Excuse me, I thought we addressed that very early on.

If it's a GLASS screen you can use whatever you choose on it that works
best for you. IE, Windex, Bon-Ami, etc.

If it's -NOT- glass then it's wise to avoid all chemical-based cleaners.
Mitsubishi, on their widescreen RPTV models says to never use anything
stronger than plain clear water and a soft cotton cloth (i.e., an old
cotton T-shirt). In the special case where there's some smudge on the
screen that won't come off with plain water, then use an alcohol-based
solvent (Isopropanol).

However, in either case you need to be careful about dousing the front of
the set with excess amounts of ANY liquid. For this reason it is always
best to dampen the rag and wipe down the screen than it is to spray the
screen and worry about excess liquid getting into controls and circuits.

In article <5tydnTyFsvkMdJHcRVn-jw@comcast.com> "Art"
<plotsligt@comcast.net> writes:

>Kinda sorry I posted that thread since now we no longer comment about
>cleaning the screen?? Eh, I agree with all the comments regarding child
>rearing, et al fin. However the gent still is confused about cleaning the
>screen on the tele. Cheers
Anonymous
August 2, 2004 12:34:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Mr Fixit" <MrFixit@msn.com> wrote in message
news:p 9upg0p3jshko5edak6s1h8pj7sfvui2dc@4ax.com...
> Excuse me, I thought we addressed that very early on.
>
> If it's a GLASS screen you can use whatever you choose on it that works
> best for you. IE, Windex, Bon-Ami, etc.
>
> If it's -NOT- glass then it's wise to avoid all chemical-based cleaners.
> Mitsubishi, on their widescreen RPTV models says to never use anything
> stronger than plain clear water and a soft cotton cloth (i.e., an old
> cotton T-shirt).
> In either case you need to be careful about dousing the front of
> the set with excess amounts of ANY liquid. For this reason it is always
> best to dampen the rag and wipe down the screen than it is to spray the
> screen and worry about excess liquid getting into controls and circuits.

If it's a glass mirror on a projection tv then clean it as you would
normally clean glass. If it's the lens in the projection tv then clean it
with a soft cloth and windex (you only need to clean once every couple of
years). DO NOT USE PAPER TOWEL even if it feels soft as that will scratch
the plastic lens. IF it's the front screen the above applys, I use one drop
of a liquid dishwashing soap on a soft cloth, (the miracle washcloths work
best) wring it out ond wipe down ONE TIME from top to bottom. DO NOT WIPE
MULTIPLE times. In the grooves of the linticular screen is a water based
black paint that can be removed if it gets too wet or you use a strong
detergent.

Using windex on plastic is not usually a good idea but one time every year
or so is not going to severly impact the plastic len.

Symptoms of dirty mirrors and lens: dark picture, lack of contrast, smoky of
foggy picture. L:o ok at black areas with white near then, does the black
grey in?
Anonymous
August 2, 2004 10:53:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Jeff Rigby wrote:

>
> If it's a glass mirror on a projection tv then clean it as you would
> normally clean glass.

Of course, if it is a first surface mirror (and it probably is) cleaning
it like it was glass will ruin it.

Matthew
Anonymous
August 3, 2004 1:08:13 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
news:10gthfv8fc8um5a@corp.supernews.com...
> Jeff Rigby wrote:
>
> >
> > If it's a glass mirror on a projection tv then clean it as you would
> > normally clean glass.
>
> Of course, if it is a first surface mirror (and it probably is) cleaning
> it like it was glass will ruin it.

Not true at all. A good cleaning cloth and Windex or other glass cleaners
are fine. You just have to be very gentle and realize that it is not
necessary to clean it at all unless there is a noticeable film on the
mirror. I have cleaned many of them, even the very fragile stretched Mylar
mirrors. Now cleaning lenticular screens is another matter and it is best
to use no cleaners at all on these.

Really, relatively few of the mirrors that I see in sets for service are
first surface mirrors.

The original post was about a direct view CRT, anyway.

Leonard
Anonymous
August 4, 2004 12:30:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Leonard Caillouet wrote:

> "Matthew L. Martin" <nothere@notnow.never> wrote in message
> news:10gthfv8fc8um5a@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>Jeff Rigby wrote:
>>
>>
>>>If it's a glass mirror on a projection tv then clean it as you would
>>>normally clean glass.
>>
>>Of course, if it is a first surface mirror (and it probably is) cleaning
>>it like it was glass will ruin it.
>
>
> Not true at all. A good cleaning cloth and Windex or other glass cleaners
> are fine. You just have to be very gentle and realize that it is not
> necessary to clean it at all unless there is a noticeable film on the
> mirror. I have cleaned many of them, even the very fragile stretched Mylar
> mirrors. Now cleaning lenticular screens is another matter and it is best
> to use no cleaners at all on these.

As you, and I say, don't treat it like glass, ie windows or direct view
displays. A vigorous scrubbing with paper towels will almost certainly
ruin a first surface mirror.

> Really, relatively few of the mirrors that I see in sets for service are
> first surface mirrors.

Really. My 7 year old 16:9 Toshiba has a first surface mirror. It is
such a cheap optimization its hard to believe that it isn't in common use.

> The original post was about a direct view CRT, anyway.

Not many of those have mirrors, anymore:-)

Matthew
August 6, 2004 6:24:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sun, 01 Aug 2004 09:17:46 -0500, Mr Fixit wrote:

> If it's -NOT- glass then it's wise to avoid all chemical-based cleaners.
> Mitsubishi, on their widescreen RPTV models says to never use anything
> stronger than plain clear water and a soft cotton cloth (i.e., an old
> cotton T-shirt). In the special case where there's some smudge on the
> screen that won't come off with plain water, then use an alcohol-based
> solvent (Isopropanol).

A bit of soap won't damage the screen, and it's tough to remove oil
without soap.
Anonymous
August 6, 2004 11:31:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"dizzy" <dizzy@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:xZBQc.233351$JR4.169887@attbi_s54...
> On Sun, 01 Aug 2004 09:17:46 -0500, Mr Fixit wrote:
>
> > If it's -NOT- glass then it's wise to avoid all chemical-based cleaners.
> > Mitsubishi, on their widescreen RPTV models says to never use anything
> > stronger than plain clear water and a soft cotton cloth (i.e., an old
> > cotton T-shirt). In the special case where there's some smudge on the
> > screen that won't come off with plain water, then use an alcohol-based
> > solvent (Isopropanol).
>
> A bit of soap won't damage the screen, and it's tough to remove oil
> without soap.

For lenticular screens, if you must use something other than water use a
very mild, very dilute soap solution. Have plenty of soft, well laundered
cotton cloths handy, and plenty of distilled or filtered water. You have
toget all of the soap off, and dry the screen thoroughly. If you don't it
will likely spot and streak. Be very gentle and be sure not to allow drips
into the set at the bottom of the screen.

Leonard
!