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what happens in raid 1 when a drive dies?

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February 18, 2007 7:51:12 PM

i mean i know you have all your data on the other drive, but what EXACTLY happens?

say i have a raid 1 setup and one of the drives just dies one day exactly what am i going to see happen when i boot up when one the drives is dead? What if the drive died while in use?

What exactly will i see if one of the drives has some bad sectors on it? What is going to happen?

Thank you in advance.(p.s. assume running win xp )

More about : raid drive dies

February 18, 2007 8:40:16 PM

I had it happen once on a Soyo motherboard built in RAID. I think it depends on the BIOS and software in your system. I never got any popups from the software but I had it set to send me an e-mail and it did. I almost thought it was spam until I vaguely remember it was a message that I wrote.

Other than that nothing happened until the next time that I rebooted then as I recall I got a cryptic message about the array being broken and no spare available. It has been almost two years ago so I am kind of fuzzy about the exact message. The RAID logic in the Soyo was by highpoint. I suppose that if I had not rebooted or set the e-mail option I would have never known as it had zero effect on system operation. I replaced the drive and the array rebuilt itself.
February 19, 2007 1:04:15 AM

thanks thats exactly what i was wondering!
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February 19, 2007 1:05:13 AM

how many drives does it take for raid 1?
February 19, 2007 7:38:42 PM

Quote:
how many drives does it take for raid 1?


just two, you must have a raid controller on your mb or buy a pci controller card capable of raid.
February 19, 2007 7:57:29 PM

hmm.. so basically if i had 2 300gb hdds it would show up as 300 gb on windows? and if it died i could just keep using the other hdd until i replace it ?
February 19, 2007 8:15:21 PM

Quote:
hmm.. so basically if i had 2 300gb hdds it would show up as 300 gb on windows? and if it died i could just keep using the other hdd until i replace it ?


Yup, that's it.

But it's no subsititute for backups, as the controller could still die on you and break your array, you could still accidentally delete stuff, and you could still lose 2 disks in short succession.
February 19, 2007 8:18:39 PM

ooooo, so what raid is good to use in that situation?
February 19, 2007 8:38:55 PM

Quote:
ooooo, so what raid is good to use in that situation?


Don't get me wrong, RAID 1 has its advantages as it protects from disk failure - but many people see it as a way to avoid the hassle of backups - it isn't.
February 19, 2007 8:46:01 PM

As ethel pointed out it does not stop you from doing dumb things like deleting files. However it can not be beat when you need real time backup like in a mom and pop store or a cheap web server.

The highpoint chips allow you to have stand-by drives and it will automatically patch one in if say you install three drives. Two make the raid 1 and the third is on standby; handy if it is a remote site. Since RAID 1 does nothing special other than mirroring, a blown controller would probably have minimal effect unless it went out during a directory update. You could simply take any of the two drives to another system and all is well for data recovery.

I don't really know what the likelihood of a blown controller really is but that Soyo system of mine is 4 years old and still runs 24/7 on Win2K server with twin 160GB's for data and a single 80GB for programs.

Also as pointed out anyone that does not do periodic sequential backup is looking to die. Fire, theft, natural disaster etc is not solved by any raid category.
February 19, 2007 11:19:30 PM

Quote:

Also as pointed out anyone that does not do periodic sequential backup is looking to die. Fire, theft, natural disaster etc is not solved by any raid category.


I dont think backing up would help you too much in those situations either. unless you made an immediate backup during the accident haha.

but if your a professional and know how to protect yourself from viruses and other stuff like that you should have no problem with any raid you choose. i would in the virus situation ( if your not a professional ) you can get a deepfreeze to protect your windows os.
February 20, 2007 12:07:19 AM

Quote:
I dont think backing up would help you too much in those situations either. unless you made an immediate backup during the accident haha.


Why would you say that? Of course, you don't store the backup tapes right next to the system; that defeats the purpose of having them. The only thing that protects against is hardware failure. If your house catches fire, you're going to wish you had your tapes offsite.
February 20, 2007 12:18:49 AM

Quote:
I dont think backing up would help you too much in those situations either. unless you made an immediate backup during the accident haha.


Why would you say that? Of course, you don't store the backup tapes right next to the system; that defeats the purpose of having them. The only thing that protects against is hardware failure. If your house catches fire, you're going to wish you had your tapes offsite.

yeah, and that would mean having to have backups up to the minute so you wont lost any data... and doing that offsite well... it would be very slow. unless you have a backup that you will always be happy with.
February 20, 2007 7:00:23 AM

Backups are not for up to the minute, that is what your RAID is for. Backups are to minimize damage. Grandfather, Father, Son is the minimum standard for large organizations. Son on site daily, father off site weekly, Grandfather out of harms way often out of state monthly. Grandfathers let you move to a cold-stage or hot-stage site if a catastrophe occurs like a natural disaster.

Then there is still the episode a couple of years ago where UPS lost B of A's Grandfather tapes in transit with hundreds of thousands of account records at risk.

If you have a big enough pipe there is always vlan to an escrow company but many companies do not trust that yet compared to disk to disk to tape to courier. Tapes are still warm and fuzzy compared to throwing something out into the ether. :) 
February 20, 2007 12:17:22 PM

Quote:
Backups are not for up to the minute, that is what your RAID is for. Backups are to minimize damage. Grandfather, Father, Son is the minimum standard for large organizations. Son on site daily, father off site weekly, Grandfather out of harms way often out of state monthly. Grandfathers let you move to a cold-stage or hot-stage site if a catastrophe occurs like a natural disaster.

Then there is still the episode a couple of years ago where UPS lost B of A's Grandfather tapes in transit with hundreds of thousands of account records at risk.

If you have a big enough pipe there is always vlan to an escrow company but many companies do not trust that yet compared to disk to disk to tape to courier. Tapes are still warm and fuzzy compared to throwing something out into the ether. :) 

yeah....
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