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p2p, simultaneous connections, router/firewall?

Last response: in Networking
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October 31, 2006 8:09:14 AM

First of all, I'm new here.. If I missed a relevant faq just flame me and I'll be off...

I've been reading a bit about p2p and specifically I'm trying to get a (more than) decent eMule environment.

I understand (and have noticed) that the number of simultaneous connections my router can handle is probably the bottleneck right now.

Connection to the net directly through aan adsl modem is not an option, security-wise.
Do hardware firewalls have a similar limitation on sim. connections as a router?
November 5, 2006 9:53:24 PM

All of those home routers are hardware firewalls, just very basic ones. To support more simultaneous connections you will need a more powerful router such as the netgear buisness line, ciso integrated services, or home made w/ an old computer and linux. All of which will incur a larger price tag in one way or another. The home made option usually isn't very power bill friendly :) 
November 5, 2006 11:16:43 PM

Quote:
All of those home routers are hardware firewalls, just very basic ones. To support more simultaneous connections you will need a more powerful router such as the netgear buisness line, ciso integrated services, or home made w/ an old computer and linux. All of which will incur a larger price tag in one way or another. The home made option usually isn't very power bill friendly :) 


I dont agree with this, there are both good and bad home routers. While the average home router seems to do around 32-64 simultaneous connections the better ones can do 128 or better. If your looking for great deal, Microcenter is selling the Dlink di-634 for $99 with a $30 rebate. I just picked up one to replace my Belkin 7321-4 and the performance increase was definitly noticeable on p2p, my speeds increased by an average of 25% and in some cases even more. Check out the router comparison chart in the network section of this site.
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November 6, 2006 2:43:18 AM

There will be good and bad in anything of course. Just as with many other things the more you pay the more you get. Most basic home routers fall into a $50-70 or so price bracket. That di-634 of yours usually falls around $100+, that is more towards buisness level stuff. It's more expensive, its more powerful, it will handle more.
November 6, 2006 12:29:33 PM

You are right, but you made it seem as if roputers made for home are no good, and thats just not correct, the cheaper routers made for home use are usually crap. But the better home routers are just as good and usually very similar to the business type routers but without all the features you need on a larger office network. Hey Vicktor you never said what kind of router you were using currently? What makes you think it is your bottleneck? Also how fast is your connection?? Check out this article p2p router article

It seems that if your on an average broadband connection of 5-10mbps most modern routers will probably be ok, its only if you have one of the faster connections that the high end routers will really show there worth. Now im just going by what the article says, personally i have a 15/2 cable connection and I noticed a nice increase in speed when i upgraded my router. So as with everything I guess YMMV. Good luck
November 8, 2006 8:05:48 AM

Thank you for the replies...

Maybe I should quantify... My router (a zyxel prestige 650H by the way) starts hogging when the total connections in eMule reach 170-180. When I limit the max. connections in eMule at 150, it runs fine and surfing is still ok.
Compared to the numbers mentioned above, this would already be a lot then... Or am I missing something, and is the number of simultaneous connections in eMule not the same as the number you are talkin about?

I read somewhere that by design _most_ routers can handle no more than 2^8 (256) connections.

Is this true?
If so - are there routers that handle more connections?
If so - will this be useful, or will I run into an other bottleneck rightaway?

--
My connection right now allows 8Mb down, 2mb upload. Number of connects per minute to a near&fast server is aroun 1300. I have no idea though if dsl limits the number of simultaneous connections.
November 8, 2006 2:54:43 PM

Is the modem you are using just a plain modem? I've had trouble in some instances with those new modem/basic router/firewall units locking up under load. What make/model modem do you have?
November 8, 2006 5:32:37 PM

256 simultaneous connections would be awesome perfoirmance. As you can see from Toms Router Chart the average router does around 64 with the high end routers doing 128-180. I could be wrong but I find it hard to believe the Zytel 650h would almost double the performance of the top-of-the-line Dlink 4300?? I just picked up a Dlink di634m to replace my POS Belkin 7321-4 and Im very happy with the results. With the Belkin I always had trouble it would freeze up after downloading any files on Utorrent that took more than 30-45minutes, my Vonage voip was terrible with the Belkin7231-4 even if I wasnt dl or surfing when I was on the phone. With the D-link di634m I have had it for almost a week and a half and not a single freeze up even when downloading huge files, my Vonage phone works flawlessly now even if im downloading or uploading huge files while talking on the phone, and the net just seems more responsive overall!! This router was the best improvement ive made to my internet connection since going from dial up to cable! I highly reccomend getting yourself a mid to high end rouyter like the D-link di634m, Dlink 4300, Netgear wpnt834 if you have a fast cable connection like i do 15/2mb and do alot of downloading of large files, use VOIP, or streaming video....etc. I believe you can find the Dlink 4300 for $99 on sale on the net, IMO its the best home router you can get right now for under $125. GOod luck
!