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Quantum computer to break the wall of more precise simuls

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February 19, 2007 12:37:32 PM

Interesting possiblity on the horizon now. The problem with more precise simulation of natural systems like molecules is the complexity can scale exponentially. In effect this creates a wall, where great increases in convention computing as we know it makes only a tiny movement up the wall. The new kind of computer in the link below, demonstrated recently, is said to scale linearly (!!) in these problems instead :

http://www.dailytech.com/Worlds+First+Commercial+Quantu...

Edits:

btw, I presume readers are old enough to think for themselves

Recent quantum computers from IBM and national labratories:

http://computer.howstuffworks.com/quantum-computer2.htm
February 19, 2007 12:43:01 PM

Yeah, except that the well touted demo has drawn catcalls from around the physics community. Seems it wasn't so much a demo as a PR and VC ploy.

And NO I'm not going to draw parallels to K10! :lol: 
February 19, 2007 12:45:09 PM

Of course, if this exists, it has just about nothing at all to do with AMD or Intel in any way or sense, except that it would affect the building of new supercomputers in a few years, which recently have been designed using large numbers of opterons or cell processors, for instance.

I think we need to remember that there is more to cpus than just Intel and AMD.
February 19, 2007 12:53:12 PM

Halbhh, dat wuz cald a joke. :D 

Yes, of course Geordie and his bunch of rain-sodden BC techies have nothing to do with Intel or AMD. The point I was trying to make is that when they had the demo they refused any form of independent verification. They could have done the numbers on an abacus and transplanted it in. That's why D-Wave's demo has not been taken seriously in scientific quarters. The demo had too much hype and hoopla and nowhere near enough verifiability in it.

Besides, Noah Semiconductors has been working for many years on the ARK processor that features 300x50x30 qubits. :lol:  :lol:  :lol: 
February 19, 2007 1:48:13 PM

No Sh*t? This was posted a while ago and no onw followed it up with news of the demo mostly because it wasn't particularly interesting. It can solve Sudoku. Woohoo!
February 19, 2007 2:01:31 PM

You don't expect each thing to be equally interesting to everyone, right?

I find that the variety of opinion and background and interest here is very diverse.

I'd expect some people find this fascinating, as I do. Don't presume if you don't care, it's somehow important. For instance, I don't care what music you like..... see?

If this can work, it's about actually being able to model nature far better than before, resulting in god knows what kind of breakthroughs.

I say stick to what interests you, and ignore what doesn't.
February 19, 2007 2:18:09 PM

Hmm... my poorly-worded post may have led you to think I was attacking you. I apologise if it did. I was merely commenting on the utter disappointment the demo turned out to be. And the "No sh*t" was directed at Captain Robert's PR Demo thing comment. D-Wave seems to be trying to up their publicity in the worst possible way :?
February 19, 2007 3:20:14 PM

Ok :-)
February 19, 2007 3:20:57 PM

*troll hat on*

Quote:
god knows what kind of breakthroughs.


If he already knows the results, why the hell are we building 'puters to check up on his rounding?

*troll hat off*

Quote:
but the actual hardware remained in Burnaby, BC where it was being chilled down to 5 millikelvin, or minus 273.145 degrees Celsius (colder than interstellar space), with liquid helium.


Commmercially viable? Perhaps when this kind of cooling is also commercially available. Hey! Maybe extreme OCers from this forum will be leading the field in Quantum OC by the end of 2008. All that experience with peltiers is gonna come in handy, Billy.
February 19, 2007 3:37:46 PM

:)  donno....God's chess game with us, maybe :wink:
February 19, 2007 6:11:38 PM

Quote:
Hmm... my poorly-worded post may have led you to think I was attacking you. I apologise if it did. I was merely commenting on the utter disappointment the demo turned out to be. And the "No sh*t" was directed at Captain Robert's PR Demo thing comment. D-Wave seems to be trying to up their publicity in the worst possible way :?


So, Shingy, you sh*t'n me? :lol: 

Yeah, I was explaining to halbhh (is his surname Aquerque?) that it was like a water engine. "Look at that video of the water engine run that dune buggy... too bad that 20 years later that engine has disappeared and no one else has been able to do that..." 8)
February 19, 2007 7:21:49 PM

Quote:
So, Shingy, you sh*t'n me? :lol: 

Nah, just D-Wave :) 

Water Engines rule OK? :x
February 19, 2007 7:43:42 PM

LOL, *troll hat*... LOVE IT! :p 
February 19, 2007 9:07:13 PM

The problem with quantum computers is that they ran run Quake at three bazillion frames per second, but only so long as no-one looks at the screen :) .
February 19, 2007 9:07:46 PM

Quote:
So, Shingy, you sh*t'n me? :lol: 

Nah, just D-Wave :) 

Water Engines rule OK? :x

No prob. You bring the engine. I'll bring the water! :lol: 
February 20, 2007 12:34:27 AM

Quote:
The problem with quantum computers is that they ran run Quake at three bazillion frames per second, but only so long as no-one looks at the screen :) .


:-) lol
February 20, 2007 1:55:36 AM

Just wondering, since I really haven't looked into it, but every time a computation is run on a quantum computer, is there an amount of time for the processor to be reset, or can another computation be run immediately afterwards? I'm wondering since the last I read on it a single computation can be entered in at a time, which causes the processor to fall into a certain way, which gives the answer.

Don't know if this means that the next computation can be entered immediately, or whether a certain cycle needs to be run in order for the next computation can be run.
February 20, 2007 7:41:47 AM

Quote:
Just wondering, since I really haven't looked into it, but every time a computation is run on a quantum computer, is there an amount of time for the processor to be reset, or can another computation be run immediately afterwards? I'm wondering since the last I read on it a single computation can be entered in at a time, which causes the processor to fall into a certain way, which gives the answer.

Don't know if this means that the next computation can be entered immediately, or whether a certain cycle needs to be run in order for the next computation can be run.


The next computation can be entered at the same time, but from a separate brane universe. 8)
February 20, 2007 9:31:45 AM

:p 

My, reality does fly.
February 20, 2007 11:27:35 AM

Quote:
:p 

My, reality does fly.


I'm in ur electrons, reversing ur spin... :lol: 
!