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Quasi-HDTV Broadcasts?

Last response: in Home Theatre
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August 2, 2004 8:11:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Good day,

I'm new to HDTV. I subsribe to DirecTV and have HDTV equipment.

I've noticed that there's only a few "real" HDTV channels (HDNET,
etc.), where the picture quality is really amazing.

HOWEVER, the channel guide for DirecTV shows a number of TV shows and
movies with an "HD" symbol next to them. When I watch these
broadcasts, they are no better than a regular broadcast, AND not even
close to the picture quality of "real" HDTV broadcasts.

So, what's the idea in this? The HD symbol next to these broadcasts?

-Albert

More about : quasi hdtv broadcasts

Anonymous
August 2, 2004 8:59:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Albert" <albertscats@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3f4b77b7.0408021511.20bd84bf@posting.google.com...
> Good day,
>
> I'm new to HDTV. I subsribe to DirecTV and have HDTV equipment.
>
> I've noticed that there's only a few "real" HDTV channels (HDNET,
> etc.), where the picture quality is really amazing.
>
> HOWEVER, the channel guide for DirecTV shows a number of TV shows and
> movies with an "HD" symbol next to them. When I watch these
> broadcasts, they are no better than a regular broadcast, AND not even
> close to the picture quality of "real" HDTV broadcasts.
>
> So, what's the idea in this? The HD symbol next to these broadcasts?

Can you give an example? Was it on one of the HD channels?

Brad Houser
Anonymous
August 3, 2004 3:14:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

You may also be watching a different resolution HD broadcast. It may be in
the HD format but at a lower res like 480 or 720, not the 1080 very sharp HD
image your expecting.

"Albert" <albertscats@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3f4b77b7.0408021511.20bd84bf@posting.google.com...
> Good day,
>
> I'm new to HDTV. I subsribe to DirecTV and have HDTV equipment.
>
> I've noticed that there's only a few "real" HDTV channels (HDNET,
> etc.), where the picture quality is really amazing.
>
> HOWEVER, the channel guide for DirecTV shows a number of TV shows and
> movies with an "HD" symbol next to them. When I watch these
> broadcasts, they are no better than a regular broadcast, AND not even
> close to the picture quality of "real" HDTV broadcasts.
>
> So, what's the idea in this? The HD symbol next to these broadcasts?
>
> -Albert
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Anonymous
August 3, 2004 6:43:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I can help here. Yeah the nutshell answer is this. If you got over the air
antenna you can get those stations. Unless it is on CBS and you got that from
Directv your screwed! Example MNF states HD so you go to it on your tv and see
regular. That is gonna happen cause Directv doesnt broadcast abc in pure high
def. So what do you do... you go to hdtvpub.com see what people in your area
are using to hook up their antennas then you buy it then you get the channels.
cause you canplug your antenna into your digital reciever most likely. PLEASE
DO NOT BUY TERK ANTENNAS THEY ARE GARBAGE! Brad if you need anything email me
at westislip@aol.com
End higher ticket prices! Go to local college games!
Anonymous
August 3, 2004 8:15:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>You may also be watching a different resolution HD broadcast. It may be in
>the HD format but at a lower res like 480 or 720, not the 1080 very sharp HD
>image your expecting.

Only 720 and 1080 are considered HD.
August 3, 2004 1:08:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Interesting. Thanks for your expertise!

By the way, I've seen some old classic movies on an HD channel that
look very, very good.

Seems like they are able to take any movie, and reprocess it in some
way to yield very high resolution.

-Albert
Anonymous
August 3, 2004 8:28:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Albert" <albertscats@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3f4b77b7.0408030808.20d957fc@posting.google.com...
> Interesting. Thanks for your expertise!
>
> By the way, I've seen some old classic movies on an HD channel that
> look very, very good.
>
> Seems like they are able to take any movie, and reprocess it in some
> way to yield very high resolution.
>
> -Albert

Film is capable of higher resolution than HDTV, so some filmed programming
can look outstanding if care is taken in the conversion and the source film
is good.
Anonymous
August 4, 2004 5:15:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>Interesting. Thanks for your expertise!
>
>By the way, I've seen some old classic movies on an HD channel that
>look very, very good.
>
>Seems like they are able to take any movie, and reprocess it in some
>way to yield very high resolution.
>
>-Albert

If the movie was made with typical film then it already has more than enough
information for HD. That means all those old TV shows and movies can eventually
be released in HD. Imagine the Honeymooners or I Love Lucy in HD. :) 
Anonymous
August 4, 2004 5:17:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>Film is capable of higher resolution than HDTV, so some filmed programming
>can look outstanding if care is taken in the conversion and the source film
>is good.
>

Not "some" but all ll fim programming should easily be capable of providing an
excellent HD source.
Anonymous
August 4, 2004 9:35:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

torrex6@cs.comnixjunk (nixjunk) wrote:

>If the movie was made with typical film then it already has more than enough
>information for HD. That means all those old TV shows and movies can eventually
>be released in HD. Imagine the Honeymooners or I Love Lucy in HD. :) 

Of course they'd have to crop them top and bottom to make them
widescreen, and maybe colorize them to get people to watch.

Think it could never happen? It already has. Koyaanisqatsi was
released years ago on VHS in 4:3 and more recently on DVD in 1.85:1,
which it claims is the "theatrical release format." Maybe so; I never
saw it in a theater. But when I watched the DVD I noticed that many
shots seemed poorly framed, and some things I'd remembered were cut
off at the top or bottom. So I compared them. The DVD is actually
the cropped version. It looks a lot better in 4:3.

The TV series Babylon 5 was shot widescreen but framed so it would
look good when cropped to 4:3, which was the way it originally aired.
When the SciFi channel reran it they wanted it in widescreen, so WB
took the 4:3 version and cropped it top and bottom.

As long as they didn't make a mess of it, if TCM converted to HD I'd
subscribe. AMC probably _would_ make a mess of it.

Del Mibbler <mibbler@nycap.rr.com>
Anonymous
August 4, 2004 7:13:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>>If the movie was made with typical film then it already has more than enough
>>information for HD. That means all those old TV shows and movies can
>eventually
>>be released in HD. Imagine the Honeymooners or I Love Lucy in HD. :) 
>
>Of course they'd have to crop them top and bottom to make them
>widescreen, and maybe colorize them to get people to watch.

They don't have to do any cropping. It could be the same aspect ratio but in
high definition. The film has that definition. The aspect ratio is another
matter.

I don't think something as silly as colorizing would need to be done. The
simple fact that they are simply being shown with much higher definition would
be more than enough to get people to watch many older shows again.
Anonymous
August 4, 2004 8:47:14 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

torrex6@cs.comnixjunk (nixjunk) wrote:

>I don't think something as silly as colorizing would need to be done. The
>simple fact that they are simply being shown with much higher definition would
>be more than enough to get people to watch many older shows again.

The colorizations I've seen have been a total waste of time. If the
job is done badly, it detracts from the film. If it's done well, you
stop noticing it after the first five minutes, and the film stands or
falls on its own.

So why bother? Marketing. But to my mind, colorization probably
drives away more potential viewers as it recruits.
Anonymous
August 4, 2004 9:22:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"nixjunk" <torrex6@cs.comnixjunk> wrote in message
news:20040804111343.26512.00002905@mb-m03.news.cs.com...
> They don't have to do any cropping. It could be the same aspect ratio but
in
> high definition. The film has that definition. The aspect ratio is another
> matter.
>
> I don't think something as silly as colorizing would need to be done. The
> simple fact that they are simply being shown with much higher definition
would
> be more than enough to get people to watch many older shows again.
>

Remember that colorizing doesn't result in a new film version of the movie,
it is a video tape. All the colorizing done in the 80's was to NTSC tape,
and would not be any better on HDTV. There are those who won't watch B/W
movies, but the demand for colorizing seems to have disappeared.

Brad Houser
Anonymous
August 19, 2004 6:07:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Albert" <albertscats@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:3f4b77b7.0408021511.20bd84bf@posting.google.com...
> Good day,
>
> I'm new to HDTV. I subsribe to DirecTV and have HDTV equipment.
>
> I've noticed that there's only a few "real" HDTV channels (HDNET,
> etc.), where the picture quality is really amazing.
>
> HOWEVER, the channel guide for DirecTV shows a number of TV shows and
> movies with an "HD" symbol next to them. When I watch these
> broadcasts, they are no better than a regular broadcast, AND not even
> close to the picture quality of "real" HDTV broadcasts.
>
> So, what's the idea in this? The HD symbol next to these broadcasts?
>
> -Albert


The HD appears next to every listing, but is only "lit up" for HD
broadcasts. As a new DirecTV subscriber, that threw me for a bit of a loop
at first.

Cody k
Anonymous
August 19, 2004 6:13:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Mike Rush" <miker@avenuenospamcable.com> wrote in message
news:wdVPc.30$MK6.1022@eagle.america.net...
> "Albert" <albertscats@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:3f4b77b7.0408030808.20d957fc@posting.google.com...
> > Interesting. Thanks for your expertise!
> >
> > By the way, I've seen some old classic movies on an HD channel that
> > look very, very good.
> >
> > Seems like they are able to take any movie, and reprocess it in some
> > way to yield very high resolution.
> >
> > -Albert
>
> Film is capable of higher resolution than HDTV, so some filmed programming
> can look outstanding if care is taken in the conversion and the source
film
> is good.
>


http://www.broadcastpapers.com/telecine/millennium06.ht...

70 MM film is capable of roughly 4 times the resolution of even HD, so if
the person converting it is worth their salary, anything is possible.

I saw an article a few months back about SHD (super-High-Definition) which
would be available for huuuuuuuge displays (the size of movie screens) with
the capability of capturing nearly 100% of all the data contained in a 70mm
film cel. Oh, baby.......

Cody
!