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Installing 2 XP HDD's

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Anonymous
March 9, 2005 3:40:07 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Brand-new HDD and XPPro OS disk. Problem in installing as 2nd disk (no room)
in frustration took out my old HDD, replaced with new one, installed XPPro
from scratch - a new experience (learning curve).

XPPro is registered, validated, updated, all the bugs sorted. No other
progs installed except AVG. Old HDD with XPHome has all my data, all my
apps. Both OS's installed/registered on this same pc.

I want to install both HDD's. Just realised that BOTH OS's are recognising
their disk as C: (silly me). I've solved the "room" problem by ditching the
3.5 floppy drive.

What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would system
crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot" system (and
correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it becomes) ?

Or, would it be best to reformat the new drive, install it blank, then
update XPPro over XPHome?

If I bit the bullet and installed XPPro over XPHome, would the installation
reformat delete the entire physical disk, or just the C: (it's partitioned
C; and D:) .

Info - XPHome, have OEM restore disk but not full system disk. XPPro is a
full system disk.

Ultimate objective - to have ONE OS, 2 HDD's, but as a learning curve would
like to experience "dual boot" set-up/operation.
Apols for long post but it's data-full, little waffle.

Sincerely, Len

More about : installing hdd

Anonymous
March 9, 2005 3:40:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

> What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would system
> crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot" system (and
> correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it becomes) ?

The system will only boot one OS - the only way it can "automatically create
a dual-boot system" is if the other OS is accessible at the point in time you
installed the second iteration of XP. In this case, it will boot what it
sees as the first hard drive available.

From here, you can go one of two routes:
1) Allow the system to boot off of XP Pro as your OS, with the other drive
also installed. Once into XP Pro, the other drive should be recognized as
D:, E:, or something of the like. Normally, it would be recognized as D:,
but if you already booted this OS and it has assigned drive letters to the
CD-ROM, removable drives, etc, it might be different. You seem like a guy
that can recognize a hard drive icon when you see one, so I'll leave it at
that. At this point, you could transfer your files over onto your primary
drive without a problem, reformat the secondary drive, and have a bunch of
extra space you might not otherwise have.
2) If you really want to experience a "dual-boot" system, the way to do it
manually is to edit your boot.ini file. To do so, follow these instructions:
a) Open notepad
b) File > Open
c) Type c:\boot.ini and click OK
d) boot.ini should now be visible
Depending on how you have your hard drives configured, the funny string you
see there will be different (if I remember right from WAAAAY back, it's
called an ARC name.) This is where it gets tricky - this syntax is very
sensitive.

The default looks like this:
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect

It breaks down into:
multi(0) <- This is the adapter the HDD is connected to. Primary is 0,
secondary is 1.
disk(0) <- Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0.
rdisk(0) <- The number of the HDD on the adapter. Master is 0, slave is 1.
partition(1) <- Partition on the harddrive that OS is installed on. MBR is
0, main partition is 1.
\WINDOWS <- Directory where OS was installed to, default is WINDOWS

If you are unsure, ADD to the list - don't replace. Give yourself several
options, like:

multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
Professional (0,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
Professional (0,1)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
multi(1)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
Professional (1,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect

Every option you add to the [operating systems] section will appear when the
system boots IF there are multiple options. In the [boot loader] section,
changing the timeout will - surprise, surprise, change the time it takes for
the menu to choose the default choice, which you can also change.

A multiboot system isn't really all that glorious, but it is good to
understand the boot.ini. NT4 wasn't that long ago, when the boot.ini would
constantly get corrupted. Those were the days. Good luck, and here's a link
for reference:

http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Window...

Mark
Anonymous
March 9, 2005 3:40:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Installing two operating systems on separate hard drives can be tricky
even for pros. There are a few things to keep in mind. Having the
operating system installed on a drive designated other than C: is not a
good idea and is practically irreversible after the fact. I have seen
many posts for help from people wanting to change one of their dual boot
operating systems that installed on another drive back to C: and the
answer always is "can't be done", at least not unless you are very
knowledgeable and extremely patient.

The way around the problem is not overly complicated and can be
circumvented with different techniques or tactics, like removing the
active flag on the primary partition on one disk and hiding partitions,
turning one drive off in the BIOS while trying to install a second os on
the second drive, or physically removing one drive while installing the
second operating system then reinstalling the drive.

Doing it like a pro doesn't mean doing it the hard way or necessarily
doing it the Microsoft way, it means doing it the easiest way and the
way that yields the best results and best usability and stability. To
do what you are wanting to do most pros use a third party boot manager
like XOSL (free) http://www.ranish.com/part/ or BootItNg (shareware)
http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/ Believe it or not that is the best,
easiest way to do it and the way most pros do it, they don't rely on the
Microsoft boot loader. In essence you have already done what some would
have done, install 1 operating system, switch drives and install the
second operating system, mount both drives in the pc. Now all that you
have to do is install a third party boot loader and you will have access
to both operating systems and both systems will be properly installed on
C drives of their own. These boot loaders are fairly easy to install
and figure out, try it! On the other hand there is absolutely nothing
wrong trying to learn and do it the Microsoft way, I would encourage you
to try it also, it will indeed be a valuable learning experience. In
the end I think you will agree that third party boot loaders are the
only way to go with setups as you describe.

Now, one thing I don't recommend is removing your diskette drive like
you did! The diskette drive is still an indispensable piece of
hardware, although USB flash devices are starting to enter the picture.
What will you do if you get a nasty virus and need to load a removal
tool on a diskette? What will you do if you need to flash the BIOS?
What will you do if you need to boot to DOS for hardware or disk
troubleshooting? Of course you can reinstall the diskette drive
temporarily, no big deal, right? OK, that is no big deal but what
concerns me the most is that you have not or are not and will not be
creating Emergency Repair Disks, because... well because you have no
diskette drive! That Emergency Repair Disk is sometimes the only thing
between life and death on NT systems and apparently you have none or
have not thought of the implications of not having a diskette drive
present in your pc. Not having an up to date ERD is a mistake that no
one makes twice, be smart and make sure you don't make the mistake at
all! Instead of removing the diskette drive you might be able to get
another drive bay cage or some sort of bracket to allow you to mount the
second drive below the first one. Or do like Red Green, use duct tape!

John

Yabbadoo wrote:
> Brand-new HDD and XPPro OS disk. Problem in installing as 2nd disk (no room)
> in frustration took out my old HDD, replaced with new one, installed XPPro
> from scratch - a new experience (learning curve).
>
> XPPro is registered, validated, updated, all the bugs sorted. No other
> progs installed except AVG. Old HDD with XPHome has all my data, all my
> apps. Both OS's installed/registered on this same pc.
>
> I want to install both HDD's. Just realised that BOTH OS's are recognising
> their disk as C: (silly me). I've solved the "room" problem by ditching the
> 3.5 floppy drive.
>
> What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would system
> crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot" system (and
> correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it becomes) ?
>
> Or, would it be best to reformat the new drive, install it blank, then
> update XPPro over XPHome?
>
> If I bit the bullet and installed XPPro over XPHome, would the installation
> reformat delete the entire physical disk, or just the C: (it's partitioned
> C; and D:) .
>
> Info - XPHome, have OEM restore disk but not full system disk. XPPro is a
> full system disk.
>
> Ultimate objective - to have ONE OS, 2 HDD's, but as a learning curve would
> like to experience "dual boot" set-up/operation.
> Apols for long post but it's data-full, little waffle.
>
> Sincerely, Len
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
March 9, 2005 3:40:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Actually, under XP doesn't it go C: for the primary drive and then D: is
either the next partition on that drive or, if none, the first optical
drive? Then E: will be the next optical drive or, if none, the next
internal hard drive. All the XP systems I have set up with two internal
drives and one optical drive have set up with D: as the optical drive and C:
and E: as the hard drives. I understand that this is slightly different
from earlier versions of Windows.

--
Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
(Reply to the group only unless otherwise requested)
"Mark Stafford" <MarkStafford@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:0F935134-4CDD-4C5C-860D-B2F7C0B115CD@microsoft.com...
>> What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would
>> system
>> crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot" system (and
>> correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it becomes) ?
>
> The system will only boot one OS - the only way it can "automatically
> create
> a dual-boot system" is if the other OS is accessible at the point in time
> you
> installed the second iteration of XP. In this case, it will boot what it
> sees as the first hard drive available.
>
> From here, you can go one of two routes:
> 1) Allow the system to boot off of XP Pro as your OS, with the other drive
> also installed. Once into XP Pro, the other drive should be recognized as
> D:, E:, or something of the like. Normally, it would be recognized as D:,
> but if you already booted this OS and it has assigned drive letters to the
> CD-ROM, removable drives, etc, it might be different. You seem like a guy
> that can recognize a hard drive icon when you see one, so I'll leave it at
> that. At this point, you could transfer your files over onto your primary
> drive without a problem, reformat the secondary drive, and have a bunch of
> extra space you might not otherwise have.
> 2) If you really want to experience a "dual-boot" system, the way to do it
> manually is to edit your boot.ini file. To do so, follow these
> instructions:
> a) Open notepad
> b) File > Open
> c) Type c:\boot.ini and click OK
> d) boot.ini should now be visible
> Depending on how you have your hard drives configured, the funny string
> you
> see there will be different (if I remember right from WAAAAY back, it's
> called an ARC name.) This is where it gets tricky - this syntax is very
> sensitive.
>
> The default looks like this:
> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
>
> It breaks down into:
> multi(0) <- This is the adapter the HDD is connected to. Primary is 0,
> secondary is 1.
> disk(0) <- Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0.
> rdisk(0) <- The number of the HDD on the adapter. Master is 0, slave is
> 1.
> partition(1) <- Partition on the harddrive that OS is installed on. MBR
> is
> 0, main partition is 1.
> \WINDOWS <- Directory where OS was installed to, default is WINDOWS
>
> If you are unsure, ADD to the list - don't replace. Give yourself several
> options, like:
>
> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> Professional (0,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> Professional (0,1)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
> multi(1)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> Professional (1,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
>
> Every option you add to the [operating systems] section will appear when
> the
> system boots IF there are multiple options. In the [boot loader] section,
> changing the timeout will - surprise, surprise, change the time it takes
> for
> the menu to choose the default choice, which you can also change.
>
> A multiboot system isn't really all that glorious, but it is good to
> understand the boot.ini. NT4 wasn't that long ago, when the boot.ini
> would
> constantly get corrupted. Those were the days. Good luck, and here's a
> link
> for reference:
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Window...
>
> Mark
Anonymous
March 9, 2005 5:37:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Mark, thanks for a very informative comprehensive reply.
Is there one typo in this line (or is it I can't get my brain to work) ?

"" > disk(0) <- Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0. ""

should this read "disk (0) <(1) Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0"
? ( ADDED THE (1) )
I understand ORIGINAL to imply the options are disk (0) or (1). Since you
say SCSI is exception, followed by statement "Normally 0" (and my disks are
not SCSI) logically the SCSI exception is (1). Not a nit-pick, just for my
clearer understanding as a novice at this level.

Answer to implied question elsewhere - I'm a second level enthusiastic
amateur, cautious but unafraid of making changes. Had a pc since Sinclair's
days. Good resource for "amateur" answers to newbie's simple questions, as I
talk at this level. Huge admirer and dabbler in these ng's, learning all
the time. PC's are my hobby now I'm retired (in winter months, anyway).

Sincerely, Len.

"Mark Stafford" <MarkStafford@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:0F935134-4CDD-4C5C-860D-B2F7C0B115CD@microsoft.com...
>> What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would
>> system
>> crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot" system (and
>> correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it becomes) ?
>
> The system will only boot one OS - the only way it can "automatically
> create
> a dual-boot system" is if the other OS is accessible at the point in time
> you
> installed the second iteration of XP. In this case, it will boot what it
> sees as the first hard drive available.
>
> From here, you can go one of two routes:
> 1) Allow the system to boot off of XP Pro as your OS, with the other drive
> also installed. Once into XP Pro, the other drive should be recognized as
> D:, E:, or something of the like. Normally, it would be recognized as D:,
> but if you already booted this OS and it has assigned drive letters to the
> CD-ROM, removable drives, etc, it might be different. You seem like a guy
> that can recognize a hard drive icon when you see one, so I'll leave it at
> that. At this point, you could transfer your files over onto your primary
> drive without a problem, reformat the secondary drive, and have a bunch of
> extra space you might not otherwise have.
> 2) If you really want to experience a "dual-boot" system, the way to do it
> manually is to edit your boot.ini file. To do so, follow these
> instructions:
> a) Open notepad
> b) File > Open
> c) Type c:\boot.ini and click OK
> d) boot.ini should now be visible
> Depending on how you have your hard drives configured, the funny string
> you
> see there will be different (if I remember right from WAAAAY back, it's
> called an ARC name.) This is where it gets tricky - this syntax is very
> sensitive.
>
> The default looks like this:
> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
>
> It breaks down into:
> multi(0) <- This is the adapter the HDD is connected to. Primary is 0,
> secondary is 1.
> disk(0) <- Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0.
> rdisk(0) <- The number of the HDD on the adapter. Master is 0, slave is
> 1.
> partition(1) <- Partition on the harddrive that OS is installed on. MBR
> is
> 0, main partition is 1.
> \WINDOWS <- Directory where OS was installed to, default is WINDOWS
>
> If you are unsure, ADD to the list - don't replace. Give yourself several
> options, like:
>
> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> Professional (0,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
> multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> Professional (0,1)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
> multi(1)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> Professional (1,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
>
> Every option you add to the [operating systems] section will appear when
> the
> system boots IF there are multiple options. In the [boot loader] section,
> changing the timeout will - surprise, surprise, change the time it takes
> for
> the menu to choose the default choice, which you can also change.
>
> A multiboot system isn't really all that glorious, but it is good to
> understand the boot.ini. NT4 wasn't that long ago, when the boot.ini
> would
> constantly get corrupted. Those were the days. Good luck, and here's a
> link
> for reference:
>
> http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Window...
>
> Mark
Anonymous
March 9, 2005 5:37:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

No typos - I hope. It should indeed be disk(0) for IDE drives. By the "only
used for SCSI" part, I meant that if you HAD a SCSI drive, you would use this
instead of rdisk to determine which hard drive to access on the controller
you specified in multi(x). As an aside, if you had SCSI drives, you would
also use scsi(x) in place of multi(x).

So a SCSI arcname might look like this:
scsi(0)disk(1)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS yada yada
which would be the second disk on the primary SCSI controller.

And in response to Colin's comments, yes, normally XP would read all HDD
first and assign them drive letters. If you add a HDD after installation,
I'm not certain how XP deals with the drive letter assignment. If you
already had a drive C: (main hard drive), a drive D: (CD-ROM), and a drive E:
(removable memory stick), and you added another HDD, I would __presume__ that
XP would assign it the drive letter F:. Drive letters associated with
physical drives tend to stay pretty static. That doesn't mean you can't
change them with the Computer Management MMC, however.

Mark

"Yabbadoo" wrote:

> Mark, thanks for a very informative comprehensive reply.
> Is there one typo in this line (or is it I can't get my brain to work) ?
>
> "" > disk(0) <- Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0. ""
>
> should this read "disk (0) <(1) Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0"
> ? ( ADDED THE (1) )
> I understand ORIGINAL to imply the options are disk (0) or (1). Since you
> say SCSI is exception, followed by statement "Normally 0" (and my disks are
> not SCSI) logically the SCSI exception is (1). Not a nit-pick, just for my
> clearer understanding as a novice at this level.
>
> Answer to implied question elsewhere - I'm a second level enthusiastic
> amateur, cautious but unafraid of making changes. Had a pc since Sinclair's
> days. Good resource for "amateur" answers to newbie's simple questions, as I
> talk at this level. Huge admirer and dabbler in these ng's, learning all
> the time. PC's are my hobby now I'm retired (in winter months, anyway).
>
> Sincerely, Len.
>
> "Mark Stafford" <MarkStafford@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:0F935134-4CDD-4C5C-860D-B2F7C0B115CD@microsoft.com...
> >> What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would
> >> system
> >> crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot" system (and
> >> correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it becomes) ?
> >
> > The system will only boot one OS - the only way it can "automatically
> > create
> > a dual-boot system" is if the other OS is accessible at the point in time
> > you
> > installed the second iteration of XP. In this case, it will boot what it
> > sees as the first hard drive available.
> >
> > From here, you can go one of two routes:
> > 1) Allow the system to boot off of XP Pro as your OS, with the other drive
> > also installed. Once into XP Pro, the other drive should be recognized as
> > D:, E:, or something of the like. Normally, it would be recognized as D:,
> > but if you already booted this OS and it has assigned drive letters to the
> > CD-ROM, removable drives, etc, it might be different. You seem like a guy
> > that can recognize a hard drive icon when you see one, so I'll leave it at
> > that. At this point, you could transfer your files over onto your primary
> > drive without a problem, reformat the secondary drive, and have a bunch of
> > extra space you might not otherwise have.
> > 2) If you really want to experience a "dual-boot" system, the way to do it
> > manually is to edit your boot.ini file. To do so, follow these
> > instructions:
> > a) Open notepad
> > b) File > Open
> > c) Type c:\boot.ini and click OK
> > d) boot.ini should now be visible
> > Depending on how you have your hard drives configured, the funny string
> > you
> > see there will be different (if I remember right from WAAAAY back, it's
> > called an ARC name.) This is where it gets tricky - this syntax is very
> > sensitive.
> >
> > The default looks like this:
> > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> > Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
> >
> > It breaks down into:
> > multi(0) <- This is the adapter the HDD is connected to. Primary is 0,
> > secondary is 1.
> > disk(0) <- Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0.
> > rdisk(0) <- The number of the HDD on the adapter. Master is 0, slave is
> > 1.
> > partition(1) <- Partition on the harddrive that OS is installed on. MBR
> > is
> > 0, main partition is 1.
> > \WINDOWS <- Directory where OS was installed to, default is WINDOWS
> >
> > If you are unsure, ADD to the list - don't replace. Give yourself several
> > options, like:
> >
> > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> > Professional (0,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
> > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> > Professional (0,1)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
> > multi(1)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
> > Professional (1,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
> >
> > Every option you add to the [operating systems] section will appear when
> > the
> > system boots IF there are multiple options. In the [boot loader] section,
> > changing the timeout will - surprise, surprise, change the time it takes
> > for
> > the menu to choose the default choice, which you can also change.
> >
> > A multiboot system isn't really all that glorious, but it is good to
> > understand the boot.ini. NT4 wasn't that long ago, when the boot.ini
> > would
> > constantly get corrupted. Those were the days. Good luck, and here's a
> > link
> > for reference:
> >
> > http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Window...
> >
> > Mark
>
>
>
Anonymous
March 9, 2005 6:17:34 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Yabbadoo wrote:
| Brand-new HDD and XPPro OS disk. Problem in installing as 2nd disk
| (no room) in frustration took out my old HDD, replaced with new one,
| installed XPPro from scratch - a new experience (learning curve).
|
| XPPro is registered, validated, updated, all the bugs sorted. No
| other progs installed except AVG. Old HDD with XPHome has all my
| data, all my apps. Both OS's installed/registered on this same pc.
|
| I want to install both HDD's. Just realised that BOTH OS's are
| recognising their disk as C: (silly me). I've solved the "room"
| problem by ditching the
| 3.5 floppy drive.
|
| What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would
| system crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot"
| system (and correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever
| it becomes) ?
|
| Or, would it be best to reformat the new drive, install it blank, then
| update XPPro over XPHome?
|
| If I bit the bullet and installed XPPro over XPHome, would the
| installation reformat delete the entire physical disk, or just the C:
| (it's partitioned C; and D:) .
|
| Info - XPHome, have OEM restore disk but not full system disk. XPPro
| is a full system disk.
|
| Ultimate objective - to have ONE OS, 2 HDD's, but as a learning curve
| would like to experience "dual boot" set-up/operation.
| Apols for long post but it's data-full, little waffle.
|
| Sincerely, Len

You are going to have problems from several different angle.
a) propriatory drivers
b) loss of preinstalled software
c) heating and venting
d) lack of experience
e) some upgrades will work others won't
Anonymous
March 9, 2005 7:09:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Jon-John - Hey, I'm lucky today, another extremely informative comprehensive
response! Thank you!

Did think long and hard about removing the floppy (I do have "rescue" disks)
but figured that if push came to shove, all that's needed is the case side
off and re-connect it, in an emergency. Tried to source extension plates to
add the HDD below the 3.5" cage. No joy (might make some if/when I get some
metal).

BootItNG - tried that a while back (before new HDD). No joy, it needs a
FAT32 partition to load onto. Both partitions I have (C: and D:)  are NTFS as
recommended for XP. So, it won't load - now I have a "boot" glitch just
after POST that says "can't find BootIt" - boot hangs, have to press a key
to continue loading XP (glitch, not problem, more an irritation). Nor can I
find the file that causes it!

I have 2 bootable HDD's, original and new, both were C: on XP set-up. I'm
confused with the BIOS advice. Objective was to have both HDD's operable,
but, if I tweak BIOS to hide one, surely it would remain hidden, i.e. not
accessible?

Will try XOSL (since it says one can experiment in "virtual" environment
without making irrevocable changes).

Thanks again for your valuable time and help.
Sincerely, Len.


"John John" <audetweld@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
news:%23g9F5iLJFHA.656@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Installing two operating systems on separate hard drives can be tricky
> even for pros. There are a few things to keep in mind. Having the
> operating system installed on a drive designated other than C: is not a
> good idea and is practically irreversible after the fact. I have seen
> many posts for help from people wanting to change one of their dual boot
> operating systems that installed on another drive back to C: and the
> answer always is "can't be done", at least not unless you are very
> knowledgeable and extremely patient.
>
> The way around the problem is not overly complicated and can be
> circumvented with different techniques or tactics, like removing the
> active flag on the primary partition on one disk and hiding partitions,
> turning one drive off in the BIOS while trying to install a second os on
> the second drive, or physically removing one drive while installing the
> second operating system then reinstalling the drive.
>
> Doing it like a pro doesn't mean doing it the hard way or necessarily
> doing it the Microsoft way, it means doing it the easiest way and the way
> that yields the best results and best usability and stability. To do what
> you are wanting to do most pros use a third party boot manager like XOSL
> (free) http://www.ranish.com/part/ or BootItNg (shareware)
> http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/ Believe it or not that is the best,
> easiest way to do it and the way most pros do it, they don't rely on the
> Microsoft boot loader. In essence you have already done what some would
> have done, install 1 operating system, switch drives and install the
> second operating system, mount both drives in the pc. Now all that you
> have to do is install a third party boot loader and you will have access
> to both operating systems and both systems will be properly installed on C
> drives of their own. These boot loaders are fairly easy to install and
> figure out, try it! On the other hand there is absolutely nothing wrong
> trying to learn and do it the Microsoft way, I would encourage you to try
> it also, it will indeed be a valuable learning experience. In the end I
> think you will agree that third party boot loaders are the only way to go
> with setups as you describe.
>
> Now, one thing I don't recommend is removing your diskette drive like you
> did! The diskette drive is still an indispensable piece of hardware,
> although USB flash devices are starting to enter the picture. What will
> you do if you get a nasty virus and need to load a removal tool on a
> diskette? What will you do if you need to flash the BIOS? What will you
> do if you need to boot to DOS for hardware or disk troubleshooting? Of
> course you can reinstall the diskette drive temporarily, no big deal,
> right? OK, that is no big deal but what concerns me the most is that you
> have not or are not and will not be creating Emergency Repair Disks,
> because... well because you have no diskette drive! That Emergency Repair
> Disk is sometimes the only thing between life and death on NT systems and
> apparently you have none or have not thought of the implications of not
> having a diskette drive present in your pc. Not having an up to date ERD
> is a mistake that no one makes twice, be smart and make sure you don't
> make the mistake at all! Instead of removing the diskette drive you might
> be able to get another drive bay cage or some sort of bracket to allow you
> to mount the second drive below the first one. Or do like Red Green, use
> duct tape!
>
> John
>
> Yabbadoo wrote:
>> Brand-new HDD and XPPro OS disk. Problem in installing as 2nd disk (no
>> room) in frustration took out my old HDD, replaced with new one,
>> installed XPPro from scratch - a new experience (learning curve).
>>
>> XPPro is registered, validated, updated, all the bugs sorted. No other
>> progs installed except AVG. Old HDD with XPHome has all my data, all my
>> apps. Both OS's installed/registered on this same pc.
>>
>> I want to install both HDD's. Just realised that BOTH OS's are
>> recognising their disk as C: (silly me). I've solved the "room" problem
>> by ditching the 3.5 floppy drive.
>>
>> What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would
>> system crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot"
>> system (and correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it
>> becomes) ?
>>
>> Or, would it be best to reformat the new drive, install it blank, then
>> update XPPro over XPHome?
>>
>> If I bit the bullet and installed XPPro over XPHome, would the
>> installation reformat delete the entire physical disk, or just the C:
>> (it's partitioned C; and D:) .
>>
>> Info - XPHome, have OEM restore disk but not full system disk. XPPro is
>> a full system disk.
>>
>> Ultimate objective - to have ONE OS, 2 HDD's, but as a learning curve
>> would like to experience "dual boot" set-up/operation.
>> Apols for long post but it's data-full, little waffle.
>>
>> Sincerely, Len
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
March 9, 2005 7:09:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Well, if you want to boot off one drive or the other you can always turn
one or the other off in the BIOS and then the pc should boot off the
other. Of course, that means that the other drive isn't available when
you start or boot the operating system so that isn't an option if you
want to share/use/store information between drives.

John

Yabbadoo wrote:
> Jon-John - Hey, I'm lucky today, another extremely informative comprehensive
> response! Thank you!
>
> Did think long and hard about removing the floppy (I do have "rescue" disks)
> but figured that if push came to shove, all that's needed is the case side
> off and re-connect it, in an emergency. Tried to source extension plates to
> add the HDD below the 3.5" cage. No joy (might make some if/when I get some
> metal).
>
> BootItNG - tried that a while back (before new HDD). No joy, it needs a
> FAT32 partition to load onto. Both partitions I have (C: and D:)  are NTFS as
> recommended for XP. So, it won't load - now I have a "boot" glitch just
> after POST that says "can't find BootIt" - boot hangs, have to press a key
> to continue loading XP (glitch, not problem, more an irritation). Nor can I
> find the file that causes it!
>
> I have 2 bootable HDD's, original and new, both were C: on XP set-up. I'm
> confused with the BIOS advice. Objective was to have both HDD's operable,
> but, if I tweak BIOS to hide one, surely it would remain hidden, i.e. not
> accessible?
>
> Will try XOSL (since it says one can experiment in "virtual" environment
> without making irrevocable changes).
>
> Thanks again for your valuable time and help.
> Sincerely, Len.
>
>
> "John John" <audetweld@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
> news:%23g9F5iLJFHA.656@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
>
>>Installing two operating systems on separate hard drives can be tricky
>>even for pros. There are a few things to keep in mind. Having the
>>operating system installed on a drive designated other than C: is not a
>>good idea and is practically irreversible after the fact. I have seen
>>many posts for help from people wanting to change one of their dual boot
>>operating systems that installed on another drive back to C: and the
>>answer always is "can't be done", at least not unless you are very
>>knowledgeable and extremely patient.
>>
>>The way around the problem is not overly complicated and can be
>>circumvented with different techniques or tactics, like removing the
>>active flag on the primary partition on one disk and hiding partitions,
>>turning one drive off in the BIOS while trying to install a second os on
>>the second drive, or physically removing one drive while installing the
>>second operating system then reinstalling the drive.
>>
>>Doing it like a pro doesn't mean doing it the hard way or necessarily
>>doing it the Microsoft way, it means doing it the easiest way and the way
>>that yields the best results and best usability and stability. To do what
>>you are wanting to do most pros use a third party boot manager like XOSL
>>(free) http://www.ranish.com/part/ or BootItNg (shareware)
>>http://www.terabyteunlimited.com/ Believe it or not that is the best,
>>easiest way to do it and the way most pros do it, they don't rely on the
>>Microsoft boot loader. In essence you have already done what some would
>>have done, install 1 operating system, switch drives and install the
>>second operating system, mount both drives in the pc. Now all that you
>>have to do is install a third party boot loader and you will have access
>>to both operating systems and both systems will be properly installed on C
>>drives of their own. These boot loaders are fairly easy to install and
>>figure out, try it! On the other hand there is absolutely nothing wrong
>>trying to learn and do it the Microsoft way, I would encourage you to try
>>it also, it will indeed be a valuable learning experience. In the end I
>>think you will agree that third party boot loaders are the only way to go
>>with setups as you describe.
>>
>>Now, one thing I don't recommend is removing your diskette drive like you
>>did! The diskette drive is still an indispensable piece of hardware,
>>although USB flash devices are starting to enter the picture. What will
>>you do if you get a nasty virus and need to load a removal tool on a
>>diskette? What will you do if you need to flash the BIOS? What will you
>>do if you need to boot to DOS for hardware or disk troubleshooting? Of
>>course you can reinstall the diskette drive temporarily, no big deal,
>>right? OK, that is no big deal but what concerns me the most is that you
>>have not or are not and will not be creating Emergency Repair Disks,
>>because... well because you have no diskette drive! That Emergency Repair
>>Disk is sometimes the only thing between life and death on NT systems and
>>apparently you have none or have not thought of the implications of not
>>having a diskette drive present in your pc. Not having an up to date ERD
>>is a mistake that no one makes twice, be smart and make sure you don't
>>make the mistake at all! Instead of removing the diskette drive you might
>>be able to get another drive bay cage or some sort of bracket to allow you
>>to mount the second drive below the first one. Or do like Red Green, use
>>duct tape!
>>
>>John
>>
>>Yabbadoo wrote:
>>
>>>Brand-new HDD and XPPro OS disk. Problem in installing as 2nd disk (no
>>>room) in frustration took out my old HDD, replaced with new one,
>>>installed XPPro from scratch - a new experience (learning curve).
>>>
>>>XPPro is registered, validated, updated, all the bugs sorted. No other
>>>progs installed except AVG. Old HDD with XPHome has all my data, all my
>>>apps. Both OS's installed/registered on this same pc.
>>>
>>>I want to install both HDD's. Just realised that BOTH OS's are
>>>recognising their disk as C: (silly me). I've solved the "room" problem
>>>by ditching the 3.5 floppy drive.
>>>
>>>What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would
>>>system crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot"
>>>system (and correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it
>>>becomes) ?
>>>
>>>Or, would it be best to reformat the new drive, install it blank, then
>>>update XPPro over XPHome?
>>>
>>>If I bit the bullet and installed XPPro over XPHome, would the
>>>installation reformat delete the entire physical disk, or just the C:
>>>(it's partitioned C; and D:) .
>>>
>>>Info - XPHome, have OEM restore disk but not full system disk. XPPro is
>>>a full system disk.
>>>
>>>Ultimate objective - to have ONE OS, 2 HDD's, but as a learning curve
>>>would like to experience "dual boot" set-up/operation.
>>>Apols for long post but it's data-full, little waffle.
>>>
>>>Sincerely, Len
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 2:42:12 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

OK, thanks & apologies. Len

"Mark Stafford" <MarkStafford@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:79ADACD7-2693-43B9-A3D8-CD7509535473@microsoft.com...
> No typos - I hope. It should indeed be disk(0) for IDE drives. By the
> "only
> used for SCSI" part, I meant that if you HAD a SCSI drive, you would use
> this
> instead of rdisk to determine which hard drive to access on the controller
> you specified in multi(x). As an aside, if you had SCSI drives, you would
> also use scsi(x) in place of multi(x).
>
> So a SCSI arcname might look like this:
> scsi(0)disk(1)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS yada yada
> which would be the second disk on the primary SCSI controller.
>
> And in response to Colin's comments, yes, normally XP would read all HDD
> first and assign them drive letters. If you add a HDD after installation,
> I'm not certain how XP deals with the drive letter assignment. If you
> already had a drive C: (main hard drive), a drive D: (CD-ROM), and a drive
> E:
> (removable memory stick), and you added another HDD, I would __presume__
> that
> XP would assign it the drive letter F:. Drive letters associated with
> physical drives tend to stay pretty static. That doesn't mean you can't
> change them with the Computer Management MMC, however.
>
> Mark
>
> "Yabbadoo" wrote:
>
>> Mark, thanks for a very informative comprehensive reply.
>> Is there one typo in this line (or is it I can't get my brain to work) ?
>>
>> "" > disk(0) <- Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0. ""
>>
>> should this read "disk (0) <(1) Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally
>> 0"
>> ? ( ADDED THE (1) )
>> I understand ORIGINAL to imply the options are disk (0) or (1). Since you
>> say SCSI is exception, followed by statement "Normally 0" (and my disks
>> are
>> not SCSI) logically the SCSI exception is (1). Not a nit-pick, just for
>> my
>> clearer understanding as a novice at this level.
>>
>> Answer to implied question elsewhere - I'm a second level enthusiastic
>> amateur, cautious but unafraid of making changes. Had a pc since
>> Sinclair's
>> days. Good resource for "amateur" answers to newbie's simple questions,
>> as I
>> talk at this level. Huge admirer and dabbler in these ng's, learning all
>> the time. PC's are my hobby now I'm retired (in winter months, anyway).
>>
>> Sincerely, Len.
>>
>> "Mark Stafford" <MarkStafford@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
>> news:0F935134-4CDD-4C5C-860D-B2F7C0B115CD@microsoft.com...
>> >> What would happen with 2 bootable formatted HDD's installed - would
>> >> system
>> >> crash, or would BIOS or XP automatically create a "dual-boot" system
>> >> (and
>> >> correct the registry settings to correct C: to whatever it becomes) ?
>> >
>> > The system will only boot one OS - the only way it can "automatically
>> > create
>> > a dual-boot system" is if the other OS is accessible at the point in
>> > time
>> > you
>> > installed the second iteration of XP. In this case, it will boot what
>> > it
>> > sees as the first hard drive available.
>> >
>> > From here, you can go one of two routes:
>> > 1) Allow the system to boot off of XP Pro as your OS, with the other
>> > drive
>> > also installed. Once into XP Pro, the other drive should be recognized
>> > as
>> > D:, E:, or something of the like. Normally, it would be recognized as
>> > D:,
>> > but if you already booted this OS and it has assigned drive letters to
>> > the
>> > CD-ROM, removable drives, etc, it might be different. You seem like a
>> > guy
>> > that can recognize a hard drive icon when you see one, so I'll leave it
>> > at
>> > that. At this point, you could transfer your files over onto your
>> > primary
>> > drive without a problem, reformat the secondary drive, and have a bunch
>> > of
>> > extra space you might not otherwise have.
>> > 2) If you really want to experience a "dual-boot" system, the way to do
>> > it
>> > manually is to edit your boot.ini file. To do so, follow these
>> > instructions:
>> > a) Open notepad
>> > b) File > Open
>> > c) Type c:\boot.ini and click OK
>> > d) boot.ini should now be visible
>> > Depending on how you have your hard drives configured, the funny string
>> > you
>> > see there will be different (if I remember right from WAAAAY back, it's
>> > called an ARC name.) This is where it gets tricky - this syntax is
>> > very
>> > sensitive.
>> >
>> > The default looks like this:
>> > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
>> > Professional" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
>> >
>> > It breaks down into:
>> > multi(0) <- This is the adapter the HDD is connected to. Primary is 0,
>> > secondary is 1.
>> > disk(0) <- Only used for SCSI, I think. Normally 0.
>> > rdisk(0) <- The number of the HDD on the adapter. Master is 0, slave
>> > is
>> > 1.
>> > partition(1) <- Partition on the harddrive that OS is installed on.
>> > MBR
>> > is
>> > 0, main partition is 1.
>> > \WINDOWS <- Directory where OS was installed to, default is WINDOWS
>> >
>> > If you are unsure, ADD to the list - don't replace. Give yourself
>> > several
>> > options, like:
>> >
>> > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
>> > Professional (0,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
>> > multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
>> > Professional (0,1)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
>> > multi(1)disk(0)rdisk(0)partition(1)\WINDOWS="Microsoft Windows XP
>> > Professional (1,0)" /noexecute=optin /fastdetect
>> >
>> > Every option you add to the [operating systems] section will appear
>> > when
>> > the
>> > system boots IF there are multiple options. In the [boot loader]
>> > section,
>> > changing the timeout will - surprise, surprise, change the time it
>> > takes
>> > for
>> > the menu to choose the default choice, which you can also change.
>> >
>> > A multiboot system isn't really all that glorious, but it is good to
>> > understand the boot.ini. NT4 wasn't that long ago, when the boot.ini
>> > would
>> > constantly get corrupted. Those were the days. Good luck, and here's
>> > a
>> > link
>> > for reference:
>> >
>> > http://www.microsoft.com/resources/documentation/Window...
>> >
>> > Mark
>>
>>
>>
!