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Wrist rests

Last response: in Systems
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February 25, 2007 9:00:11 PM

Ok, so this carpal tunnel syndrome is really worrying. In my left hand, sometimes the ring and little finger go numb, after playing games, or in the morning. I think this is carpal tunnel, because I rest my arm on the edge of the desk. Gah.

Anyway, the temporary solution I found was to put a bundled up sock under my wrist, and the numbness has gone.

So, anyone know of any decent wrist rests, for both keyboards and mice? Or is my sock just as good?

I wan't sure where to post with this :?

More about : wrist rests

February 25, 2007 9:30:20 PM

I use a palm rest for my keyboard with good results. Unfortunatly, most palm rests are too thick for most keyboards, matching up with the older keyboards nicely. So I use an old keyboard too.
February 25, 2007 10:12:12 PM

nothing will help you, if you spend more time than you should on computer. I've been suffering rsi for years, it's just something you get used to. eventually you'll see specialists, who'll advise this and that, and prescribe pain killers for the chronic pain relief. However I'd rather live with that, than a life of tedium.
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February 25, 2007 10:12:42 PM

try something like this for your mousepad. I bought a mousepad with a wrist pad, but the ones I seen at newegg there weren't very nice.
February 25, 2007 10:21:45 PM

The most important thing is that you must have your arms resting on the desk - i.e. the keyboard must be quite a way from the edge of the desk so that there's space for your forearms.

Another thing to consider is getting an ergonomic keyboard - these are designed to help you type in a natural position with the arms at an angle to each other rather than parallel. Here's a link:

http://www.dabs.com/productview.aspx?Quicklinx=3SMQ&Sea...

I've got this keyboard at work and it's really comfortable to use.
February 25, 2007 10:35:59 PM

Quote:
nothing will help you, if you spend more time than you should on computer. I've been suffering rsi for years, it's just something you get used to. eventually you'll see specialists, who'll advise this and that, and prescribe pain killers for the chronic pain relief. However I'd rather live with that, than a life of tedium.


I've had RSI for 15 years and my keyboard palm rest works perfectly to avoid agrivating it. I work from the computer, about 12 hours a day, about 6 days a week.

I've never found a good solution for mousing comfort, I started using keyboard shortcuts to reduce agrivating RSI in my wrist and bursitus in my pointer finger.

As to your "nothing will help" comment, the proper keyboard angle, sitting position, palm rest, etc has all but eliminated my keyboarding problems.
February 25, 2007 11:06:12 PM

Quote:
The most important thing is that you must have your arms resting on the desk - i.e. the keyboard must be quite a way from the edge of the desk so that there's space for your forearms.

Another thing to consider is getting an ergonomic keyboard - these are designed to help you type in a natural position with the arms at an angle to each other rather than parallel. Here's a link:

http://www.dabs.com/productview.aspx?Quicklinx=3SMQ&Sea...

I've got this keyboard at work and it's really comfortable to use.


That would be a good idea, it would keep your wrists parallel to your arms, which is very important. Unfortunately God, evolution, etc. didn't make our bodies as narrow as keyboards. Just don't buy gel rests, I had one and they're junk IMO (foam's better).
February 26, 2007 11:39:52 AM

Quote:
nothing will help you, if you spend more time than you should on computer. I've been suffering rsi for years, it's just something you get used to. eventually you'll see specialists, who'll advise this and that, and prescribe pain killers for the chronic pain relief. However I'd rather live with that, than a life of tedium.


I've had RSI for 15 years and my keyboard palm rest works perfectly to avoid agrivating it. I work from the computer, about 12 hours a day, about 6 days a week.

I've never found a good solution for mousing comfort, I started using keyboard shortcuts to reduce agrivating RSI in my wrist and bursitus in my pointer finger.

As to your "nothing will help" comment, the proper keyboard angle, sitting position, palm rest, etc has all but eliminated my keyboarding problems.

Thank you for your insightful remarks, however I'm not surprised that you claim to be suffering from rsi if you have been using a computer for 72 hours a week for the last 15 years. Perhaps if you had used a computer for just 36 hours a week, you wouldn't have that problem. Certainly don't expect your doctor to be too sympathetic about your problem. At the end of the day, you are suffering from the consequences of the lifestyle that you have chosen for yourself. I can accept that so why can't you.
February 26, 2007 6:09:15 PM

Wow, you're jumping to a number of very annoying assumptions, and then making conclusions based on your assumptions! Wow!

I got RSI from working in factories, not computers. And though I may work from a computer now, my RSI is greatly reduced compared to OTHER jobs I've had. I don't have to accept it because I have it managed, keyboarding is no longer a problem.

As for mousing, as I said it's better for me to use keyboard shortcuts when possible.
February 26, 2007 6:17:03 PM

Quote:
Another thing to consider is getting an ergonomic keyboard - these are designed to help you type in a natural position with the arms at an angle to each other rather than parallel. Here's a link:

http://www.dabs.com/productview.aspx?Quicklinx=3SMQ&Sea...

I've got this keyboard at work and it's really comfortable to use.


I use ergonomic keyboards and LOVE them! They took a little while to get used to, but they really make a big difference when doing a lot of typing.
February 26, 2007 10:05:44 PM

It was perfectly reasonable to assume you had acquired rsi as a result of being a heavy computer user for the last 15 years! I was going to suggest that you change occupation, but you already seem to have achieved that. However your views are not particularly helpful if you claim that being a heavy computer user for the last 15 years has actually resulted in a reduction of your rsi problem, which is quite a paradox. Your experiences are in fact the opposite to what is actually being sought.
February 26, 2007 10:25:13 PM

He's seeking solutions to make his computing experience less problematic. I've found solutions to making my computing experience essentially zero-impact. Moving from heavy hands-on work to comfortable computing has reduced the severity of my injuries by at least 80%

I'm glad to help.
February 26, 2007 10:46:31 PM

Had similiar problem, partially solved by good gelled wrist rest. My issue was compounded with bad elbow caused by angle/distance to keyboard and poor support from arm of chair. That was only solved when I started using a bigger work surface that allowed for forearm and elbow to rest on slightly padded surface.
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