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November 18, 2006 5:47:37 PM

I'm looking at buying a 16port switch for LAN parties. I'm wondering if 1000TX means backwards compatible with 1000T for starters. Secondly, how do I know if a switch supports jumbo frames, something which I think I want...particularly in the future. Any advice would be great. There are a few switches which I know for certain DO support jumbo frames because they say so. Thanks in advance!

~Ry

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November 18, 2006 5:51:49 PM

Among the switches I'm looking at are:

D-Link's
DGS1016D

NetGear's
GS116

The NetGear one is considerably cheaper, and if it has jumbo frame capability than I think it's the one I want.

There are also great 8port switches which I know for certain support jumbo frames. If I get two is it the same as one 16port switch? How do I connect them? Any information would be great. I plan on hooking up my consoles perhaps and a print server as well. If you could recommend me a great wireless (G with wireless-N future capability maybe?) print server on the cheap, that'd be helpful too. Thanks again, to anyone who responds!

One more thing, there's also some advertised as being "copper." Does this mean they just run cooler or dissipate heat better?
November 29, 2006 10:23:41 PM

Go with the Dlink.

Netgear's do not support large packet unless it says so on the box. They do not distinguish between hardware versions. Meaning you must have the latest version and they do not fully support the QoS spec.

Copper means that its ethernet 1000baseT over copper.

Most 16 port switches have active cooling (fan). 8 ports do not. Depending on the switch some have a WAN port for connecting into your current system.
December 2, 2006 12:07:07 PM

Quote:
There are also great 8port switches which I know for certain support jumbo frames. If I get two is it the same as one 16port switch? How do I connect them? Any information would be great. I plan on hooking up my consoles perhaps and a print server as well. If you could recommend me a great wireless (G with wireless-N future capability maybe?) print server on the cheap, that'd be helpful too. Thanks again, to anyone who responds!

One more thing, there's also some advertised as being "copper." Does this mean they just run cooler or dissipate heat better?


You could get 8 port switches and connect them with a cross over cable, unless they have MDX ports (auto-crossover), in that case you can use a standard cable instead. If you pursue that path, you will loose 1 port on each switch, giving you an effective 14 port switch. The other thing you will loose is speed between the two switches; 1 16 portswitch will, in general, have a greater non-blocking backplane bandwidth than 2x8 port switches. (I can describe this more if you want.)

edit: Never mind
Quote:
The other thing is the '5-4-3 rule' for networking might come into play. You can only cascade so many devices on a network before having problems.
{Router}--{Gigabit switch}--{Gigabit switch}--{wireless access point}
I never really understood if this applied to switched networks or just 'hubs'

Can't help you with a wireless print server, my experience is with wired. I have a built in printserver on my OKI 5150 (works great) and prior had a Intel 3 port print server connected to a HP 5L (old laser -worked good) and a HP 11x17 inkjet (worked but was a PITA) I would recomend avoiding wireless and get a wired device (preferably built into the printer), may save you many headaches.

Copper just means they use copper cabling as noted above, fiber (or rare now, coax) are the other options. Fiber is common enough with gigabit to need to differentiate.
!