Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

LCD vs. DLP

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
Anonymous
August 25, 2004 7:30:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I am thinking about a 50" set, but I can't seem to decide between LCD and
DLP. (If I get a DLP what is the model to get and if I get a LCD what is
the model to get?) What is the latest on one vs. the other. Also, has
anyone orders a set from a dealer on the web? Are there some good prices to
be had over Circuit City, Best Buy, etc. How are warranties handled with
units purchased this way?

More about : lcd dlp

Anonymous
August 25, 2004 7:30:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:

> I am thinking about a 50" set, but I can't seem to decide between LCD and
> DLP. (If I get a DLP what is the model to get and if I get a LCD what is
> the model to get?) What is the latest on one vs. the other. Also, has
> anyone orders a set from a dealer on the web? Are there some good prices to
> be had over Circuit City, Best Buy, etc. How are warranties handled with
> units purchased this way?

I'm very happy with my Sony 50" LCD that a got a few weeks ago but
according the the posts in this group in the last two days it's already
obsolete.

There is no clear winner yet, the different technologies keep leapfroging
each other. This week's hot technology seems to be LCOS (liquid crystal on
silicon), people in this group have been raving about a new JVC set that
was just introduced (haven't seen it so I don't know). Last month the Sony
LCD projection set was the one to get. In the very near future Samsung is
going to introduce their next generation DLP sets. The best advice is to
go to Best Buy and Circuit city and look at them. All of the HD
technologies are producing really good pictures and all of them suffer
from various reliablity issues. Plasmas have burn in problems, the
projection sets all have very expensive light bulbs that burn out (the
light bulbs cost as much as an analog TV). The DLP sets have a motor in
them that can wear out.

As for buying off of the web the thing to take into account is sheer size
of these things. If something goes wrong how do you send it back? In fact
how do you pick it up? I bought mine from Best Buy and I also paid for
installation (that actually saved me money, I live in MA and the store I
bought it from was in NH, it cost me $100 to have it installed but I save
$200 on sales tax), and I bought the in home warranty. Normally I'd never
buy a warranty but these sets have reliablity issues and if it breaks
there is no way I can drag it back to the store.
August 25, 2004 12:25:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Perhaps the biggest factor is a displays ability to accurately render shadow
detail. Most LCD's and DLP's have done very poorly in this area. Significant
improvements have been introduced and are in the pipe line. More accurate
and a wider range of colors are also in the pipe line. New sets about to hit
are lower in cost, improved and more intergrated. Use your eyes and not your
emotions and you will do OK.

Richard.
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
August 25, 2004 4:23:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Weird you didn't pay tax since Best Buy has stores in MA and I
thought (?) that if the seller operates in MA and ships you the set
from another state's store... you still pay the tax?

Splain Lucy.

On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 00:00:29 -0400, General Schvantzkoph
<schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:
>
>> I am thinking about a 50" set, but I can't seem to decide between LCD and
>> DLP. (If I get a DLP what is the model to get and if I get a LCD what is
>> the model to get?) What is the latest on one vs. the other. Also, has
>> anyone orders a set from a dealer on the web? Are there some good prices to
>> be had over Circuit City, Best Buy, etc. How are warranties handled with
>> units purchased this way?
>
>I'm very happy with my Sony 50" LCD that a got a few weeks ago but
>according the the posts in this group in the last two days it's already
>obsolete.
>
>There is no clear winner yet, the different technologies keep leapfroging
>each other. This week's hot technology seems to be LCOS (liquid crystal on
>silicon), people in this group have been raving about a new JVC set that
>was just introduced (haven't seen it so I don't know). Last month the Sony
>LCD projection set was the one to get. In the very near future Samsung is
>going to introduce their next generation DLP sets. The best advice is to
>go to Best Buy and Circuit city and look at them. All of the HD
>technologies are producing really good pictures and all of them suffer
>from various reliablity issues. Plasmas have burn in problems, the
>projection sets all have very expensive light bulbs that burn out (the
>light bulbs cost as much as an analog TV). The DLP sets have a motor in
>them that can wear out.
>
>As for buying off of the web the thing to take into account is sheer size
>of these things. If something goes wrong how do you send it back? In fact
>how do you pick it up? I bought mine from Best Buy and I also paid for
>installation (that actually saved me money, I live in MA and the store I
>bought it from was in NH, it cost me $100 to have it installed but I save
>$200 on sales tax), and I bought the in home warranty. Normally I'd never
>buy a warranty but these sets have reliablity issues and if it breaks
>there is no way I can drag it back to the store.
August 25, 2004 7:35:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

agreed. when i bought my RPTV from circuit city in NH several years ago, i
was told if they delivered it to my MA address, they would have to charge me
tax, so i had to come back with a buddy and his truck.

<drgrafix@hotpotato.com> wrote in message
news:h00kkv0d7qpa9a94p0pobl81jdi71mp3fu@4ax.com...
> Weird you didn't pay tax since Best Buy has stores in MA and I
> thought (?) that if the seller operates in MA and ships you the set
> from another state's store... you still pay the tax?
>
> Splain Lucy.
>
> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 00:00:29 -0400, General Schvantzkoph
> <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:
>>
>>> I am thinking about a 50" set, but I can't seem to decide between LCD
>>> and
>>> DLP. (If I get a DLP what is the model to get and if I get a LCD what
>>> is
>>> the model to get?) What is the latest on one vs. the other. Also, has
>>> anyone orders a set from a dealer on the web? Are there some good
>>> prices to
>>> be had over Circuit City, Best Buy, etc. How are warranties handled
>>> with
>>> units purchased this way?
>>
>>I'm very happy with my Sony 50" LCD that a got a few weeks ago but
>>according the the posts in this group in the last two days it's already
>>obsolete.
>>
>>There is no clear winner yet, the different technologies keep leapfroging
>>each other. This week's hot technology seems to be LCOS (liquid crystal on
>>silicon), people in this group have been raving about a new JVC set that
>>was just introduced (haven't seen it so I don't know). Last month the Sony
>>LCD projection set was the one to get. In the very near future Samsung is
>>going to introduce their next generation DLP sets. The best advice is to
>>go to Best Buy and Circuit city and look at them. All of the HD
>>technologies are producing really good pictures and all of them suffer
>>from various reliablity issues. Plasmas have burn in problems, the
>>projection sets all have very expensive light bulbs that burn out (the
>>light bulbs cost as much as an analog TV). The DLP sets have a motor in
>>them that can wear out.
>>
>>As for buying off of the web the thing to take into account is sheer size
>>of these things. If something goes wrong how do you send it back? In fact
>>how do you pick it up? I bought mine from Best Buy and I also paid for
>>installation (that actually saved me money, I live in MA and the store I
>>bought it from was in NH, it cost me $100 to have it installed but I save
>>$200 on sales tax), and I bought the in home warranty. Normally I'd never
>>buy a warranty but these sets have reliablity issues and if it breaks
>>there is no way I can drag it back to the store.
>
Anonymous
August 25, 2004 9:35:28 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I also bought the extended warranty which I normally do not. However,
after reading the fine prints, I am not sure the warranty worth anything.
There is a clause "Buyout" in the warranty. It says "In the event We are
unable to repair Your product(s) due to unavailability of equipment (!)
or parts, We at Our option may elect to buy out the Contract up to the
original purchase price less any claims paid". So for any expensive
repair, they can simply buy out the contract. I bought a 42"
plasma display from CDW and the service warranty repair sold by them is
Service Net. I am going to contact CDW to find more about this clause
before I need repairs in the future. I would appreciate any comments
on this. If you bought any extended warranty for CDW, please let them
know that you are concerned about this clause.


In article <pan.2004.08.25.04.00.28.348952@yahoo.com>,
General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote:
>On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:
>
>......
>installation (that actually saved me money, I live in MA and the store I
>bought it from was in NH, it cost me $100 to have it installed but I save
>$200 on sales tax), and I bought the in home warranty. Normally I'd never
>buy a warranty but these sets have reliablity issues and if it breaks
>there is no way I can drag it back to the store.
>
Anonymous
August 25, 2004 11:19:43 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Here is where it comes in handy having a buddy living on an Indian
reservation-no taxes. The indians have EVERYTHING delivered, new cars, TVs,
building materials, tobacco, tax free.

--Dan

"Rob" <rob@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:Ek2Xc.14386$IO1.12376@trndny03...
> agreed. when i bought my RPTV from circuit city in NH several years ago,
i
> was told if they delivered it to my MA address, they would have to charge
me
> tax, so i had to come back with a buddy and his truck.
>
> <drgrafix@hotpotato.com> wrote in message
> news:h00kkv0d7qpa9a94p0pobl81jdi71mp3fu@4ax.com...
> > Weird you didn't pay tax since Best Buy has stores in MA and I
> > thought (?) that if the seller operates in MA and ships you the set
> > from another state's store... you still pay the tax?
> >
> > Splain Lucy.
> >
> > On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 00:00:29 -0400, General Schvantzkoph
> > <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote:
> >
> >>On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:
> >>
> >>> I am thinking about a 50" set, but I can't seem to decide between LCD
> >>> and
> >>> DLP. (If I get a DLP what is the model to get and if I get a LCD
what
> >>> is
> >>> the model to get?) What is the latest on one vs. the other. Also,
has
> >>> anyone orders a set from a dealer on the web? Are there some good
> >>> prices to
> >>> be had over Circuit City, Best Buy, etc. How are warranties handled
> >>> with
> >>> units purchased this way?
> >>
> >>I'm very happy with my Sony 50" LCD that a got a few weeks ago but
> >>according the the posts in this group in the last two days it's already
> >>obsolete.
> >>
> >>There is no clear winner yet, the different technologies keep
leapfroging
> >>each other. This week's hot technology seems to be LCOS (liquid crystal
on
> >>silicon), people in this group have been raving about a new JVC set that
> >>was just introduced (haven't seen it so I don't know). Last month the
Sony
> >>LCD projection set was the one to get. In the very near future Samsung
is
> >>going to introduce their next generation DLP sets. The best advice is to
> >>go to Best Buy and Circuit city and look at them. All of the HD
> >>technologies are producing really good pictures and all of them suffer
> >>from various reliablity issues. Plasmas have burn in problems, the
> >>projection sets all have very expensive light bulbs that burn out (the
> >>light bulbs cost as much as an analog TV). The DLP sets have a motor in
> >>them that can wear out.
> >>
> >>As for buying off of the web the thing to take into account is sheer
size
> >>of these things. If something goes wrong how do you send it back? In
fact
> >>how do you pick it up? I bought mine from Best Buy and I also paid for
> >>installation (that actually saved me money, I live in MA and the store I
> >>bought it from was in NH, it cost me $100 to have it installed but I
save
> >>$200 on sales tax), and I bought the in home warranty. Normally I'd
never
> >>buy a warranty but these sets have reliablity issues and if it breaks
> >>there is no way I can drag it back to the store.
> >
>
>
Anonymous
August 26, 2004 1:28:41 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

The trick on avoiding tax is having and installation not a delivery. The
installers are an independent company with no presence in Ma. If Best Buy
were to deliver it they would have to charge tax but they aren't
deliverying it. The installers pick up the TV from Best Buy and they
transport it.
Anonymous
August 26, 2004 10:18:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Charlie Ih" <ih@duck.ee.udel.edu> wrote in message
news:cgiil0$ijm$1@dewey.udel.edu...
> I also bought the extended warranty which I normally do not. However,
> after reading the fine prints, I am not sure the warranty worth anything.
> There is a clause "Buyout" in the warranty. It says "In the event We are
> unable to repair Your product(s) due to unavailability of equipment (!)
> or parts, We at Our option may elect to buy out the Contract up to the
> original purchase price less any claims paid". So for any expensive
> repair, they can simply buy out the contract. I bought a 42"
> plasma display from CDW and the service warranty repair sold by them is
> Service Net. I am going to contact CDW to find more about this clause
> before I need repairs in the future. I would appreciate any comments
> on this. If you bought any extended warranty for CDW, please let them
> know that you are concerned about this clause.

Maybe you could:

1) Read the fine print BEFORE a purchase.
2) Buy from a reputable local dealer who handles the service for any
contracts that they sell.
3) Check out the reputation of the company backing the warranty BEFORE
buying it.

Extended Warranties are simply insurance that is only as good as the company
behind it and the servicer doing the repairs. Service Net Solutions is one
of the larger providers, so it should not be hard to check them out with
local service centers to see if they pay claims promptly and are "hassle
free" or if they weasel out of high cost repairs. Find out who the local
servicers are and ask them what kind of company this is.

A good way to check out the rep of warranty companies is to post a question
on sci.electronics.repair where you will find some very experienced service
techs. Chances are pretty good someone has done business with the company.

Leonard
Anonymous
August 26, 2004 9:22:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<pan.2004.08.25.04.00.28.348952@yahoo.com>...
> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:
>
SNIP Plasmas have burn in problems, the projection sets all have
very expensive light bulbs that burn out (the
> light bulbs cost as much as an analog TV). The DLP sets have a motor in
> them that can wear out.
SNIP

Plasma burn in problem is exaggerated. Have you ever seen one in a
home environment? Or is it something you've "heard" or read about?
Burn in can happen, but only to ignorant and abusive owner.
Bulbs for LCD are about $200-$250 each. Not cheap, but it should be
good for at least 5000-6000 hours.
All moving parts will wear out, but Samsung color wheel will not need
replacement before 10,000 hours.
Of course there are other aspects that could be improved with each
technology, but I'm just pointing out the common misconceptions.
Anonymous
August 27, 2004 9:50:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"mdt1834" <MTRAN@DIR.CA.GOV> wrote in message
news:36fe47c7.0408261622.6199b51b@posting.google.com...
> General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:<pan.2004.08.25.04.00.28.348952@yahoo.com>...
> > On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:
> >
> SNIP Plasmas have burn in problems, the projection sets all have
> very expensive light bulbs that burn out (the
> > light bulbs cost as much as an analog TV). The DLP sets have a motor in
> > them that can wear out.
> SNIP
>
> Plasma burn in problem is exaggerated. Have you ever seen one in a
> home environment? Or is it something you've "heard" or read about?
> Burn in can happen, but only to ignorant and abusive owner.
> Bulbs for LCD are about $200-$250 each. Not cheap, but it should be
> good for at least 5000-6000 hours.
> All moving parts will wear out, but Samsung color wheel will not need
> replacement before 10,000 hours.
> Of course there are other aspects that could be improved with each
> technology, but I'm just pointing out the common misconceptions.

When you make generalizations like this you are possibly misleading people
yourself. Some of the things you said are themselves incorrect. The fact
is that lamp life and costs vary greatly. Some lamps may be in the
$200-$300 range, some are much higher. Some sets rate lamp life at 1000
hours, some at 8000. Color wheels should last well over 10,000 hours, but
have been known to fail much sooner on some of the Samsung sets. And yes, I
have seen burn in on home PDP units, even with very well educated consumers,
just like with CRT based sets. It can be avoided but usually happens when a
family member or a visitor gets careless or just does not know.

All technologies have their caveats, and putting them in context is
important. When you do, make sure that you have your facts right and you
don't overgeneralize. Facts like rated lamp life and cost should be checked
out for the particular model set with suppliers who actually stock the
product or with the manufacturer. Even then, we have seen wide variations
in the life and/or reliability of many products, especially lamps and lower
end models.

Leonard
Anonymous
August 27, 2004 10:30:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"mdt1834" <MTRAN@DIR.CA.GOV> wrote in message
news:36fe47c7.0408261622.6199b51b@posting.google.com...
> General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:<pan.2004.08.25.04.00.28.348952@yahoo.com>...
>> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:
>>
> SNIP Plasmas have burn in problems, the projection sets all have
> very expensive light bulbs that burn out (the
>> light bulbs cost as much as an analog TV). The DLP sets have a motor in
>> them that can wear out.
> SNIP
>
> Plasma burn in problem is exaggerated. Have you ever seen one in a
> home environment? Or is it something you've "heard" or read about?

I have a coworker who's father got one. I actually warned her in advance
about possible burn in. Appearantly the message wasn't transmitted or
heeded. She said since the first couple of months, it has had images visibly
burned into the screen. And the reaction was sort of "oh well, we'll just
live with it" After paying that much??? To each his own, I guess. I think
they may have learned more about it now, and possibly turned down the
brightness/contrast to prevent future damage.

I agree that a properly calibrated plasma may not ever show visible burn in,
but I don't think that anyone should be considered either ignorant or
abusive if their TV does suffer burn in. On the other hand I think any
manufacturer that ships a set with default settings likely to cause burn in
should be required to replace any such set free of charge within the first
year...Either the set is clearly defective when used at default settings or
they should be sued for false advertising: if the mode I thought it looked
good in in the store (and that it was set to out of the box) will damage the
set if actually used, then you are promising something other than what you
are actually selling. (Never mind that once set up properly it probably
looks as good as or better than in "torch" mode anyway - but if so, then
that's how it should be shown in the store, or at least set to out of the
box! Let the stores change their sets to torch mode if they want them to
sell better, but the ones you take home shouldn't start off that way!)

> Burn in can happen, but only to ignorant and abusive owner.
> Bulbs for LCD are about $200-$250 each. Not cheap, but it should be
> good for at least 5000-6000 hours.
> All moving parts will wear out, but Samsung color wheel will not need
> replacement before 10,000 hours.
> Of course there are other aspects that could be improved with each
> technology, but I'm just pointing out the common misconceptions.
Anonymous
August 28, 2004 6:43:18 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

One thing that's not obvious in the store is black level. I got the Sony
which looks awesome in the store. However, in low light with darker scenes,
the still less than optimal black level creates a gray picture instead of
black. I understand that this will be much better with the new DLP chip
based sets. I would wait...


"General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.08.25.04.00.28.348952@yahoo.com...
> On Wed, 25 Aug 2004 03:30:34 +0000, J&D Schnoor wrote:
>
> > I am thinking about a 50" set, but I can't seem to decide between LCD
and
> > DLP. (If I get a DLP what is the model to get and if I get a LCD what
is
> > the model to get?) What is the latest on one vs. the other. Also, has
> > anyone orders a set from a dealer on the web? Are there some good
prices to
> > be had over Circuit City, Best Buy, etc. How are warranties handled
with
> > units purchased this way?
>
> I'm very happy with my Sony 50" LCD that a got a few weeks ago but
> according the the posts in this group in the last two days it's already
> obsolete.
>
> There is no clear winner yet, the different technologies keep leapfroging
> each other. This week's hot technology seems to be LCOS (liquid crystal on
> silicon), people in this group have been raving about a new JVC set that
> was just introduced (haven't seen it so I don't know). Last month the Sony
> LCD projection set was the one to get. In the very near future Samsung is
> going to introduce their next generation DLP sets. The best advice is to
> go to Best Buy and Circuit city and look at them. All of the HD
> technologies are producing really good pictures and all of them suffer
> from various reliablity issues. Plasmas have burn in problems, the
> projection sets all have very expensive light bulbs that burn out (the
> light bulbs cost as much as an analog TV). The DLP sets have a motor in
> them that can wear out.
>
> As for buying off of the web the thing to take into account is sheer size
> of these things. If something goes wrong how do you send it back? In fact
> how do you pick it up? I bought mine from Best Buy and I also paid for
> installation (that actually saved me money, I live in MA and the store I
> bought it from was in NH, it cost me $100 to have it installed but I save
> $200 on sales tax), and I bought the in home warranty. Normally I'd never
> buy a warranty but these sets have reliablity issues and if it breaks
> there is no way I can drag it back to the store.
>
!