installing Linux on Win2000 HD, boot order mixed up, nothi..

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,comp.os.linux (More info?)

We have a computer with Windows 2000 on it, on which we have forgotten
all passwords to all accounts (including BIOS setup), effectively
rendering this machine useless. However, there is not anything on this
computer which we want/need to keep. Therefore, we have decided to try
to install Fedora Core 2, as the Windows 2000 install CD has gone
missing. Sounds simple enough, BUT:

The password resetting tool from
http://home.eunet.no/~pnordahl/ntpasswd/bootdisk.html failed to detect
the partition it needed to reset the password on, so that was no help on
getting into win2000.

The boot device order prevents booting from the CD drive as long as
there is a bootable hard drive there...and being locked out of the BIOS
prevents any alteration to this configuration. (unplugging the hard
drive lets us boot the FC2 CD fine...but then there's no HD to install
onto...) I've considered flashing BIOS to gain access to the boot device
order, but I'm not sure of the manufacturer or any other necessary
information for that.

We have tried using a Windows 98 boot disk from one of our other
computers to reformat the drive (format c:) so as to enable booting from
the CD, but to no avail. ("boot failed" is the informative error message
it gives.)

Does ANYBODY have ANY ideas on how to accomplish this task? Would
something like swiping a magnet over the drive work and just require
that it be formatted again, or would it be ruined then?

Thanks for any suggestions!

John
9 answers Last reply
More about installing linux win2000 boot order mixed nothi
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,comp.os.linux (More info?)

    John wrote:

    > The boot device order prevents booting from the CD drive as long as
    > there is a bootable hard drive there...and being locked out of the BIOS
    > prevents any alteration to this configuration.

    .... most computers these days have a "password reset"
    feature built into the motherboard. normally it's a
    jumper that you simply remove (or cover) and boot up.
    if i were you, i'd open the box up and check for it.

    unless, of course, you've put a padlock on the computer
    and have lost that too
    :)
    --
    << http://michaeljtobler.homelinux.com/ >>
    In America, any boy may become president and I suppose
    that's just one of the risks he takes. - Adlai Stevenson
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    mjt wrote:
    > John wrote:
    >
    >
    >>The boot device order prevents booting from the CD drive as long as
    >>there is a bootable hard drive there...and being locked out of the BIOS
    >>prevents any alteration to this configuration.
    >
    >
    > ... most computers these days have a "password reset"
    > feature built into the motherboard. normally it's a
    > jumper that you simply remove (or cover) and boot up.
    > if i were you, i'd open the box up and check for it.
    >
    > unless, of course, you've put a padlock on the computer
    > and have lost that too
    > :)

    On some older pc's you can clear the BIOS pswd by removing
    the CMOS battery for about an hour.

    --
    Anti-spam address, change each 'X' to '.' to reply directly.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    "John" <johnches06@netscape.net> wrote in message
    news:layOc.77$nc5.79503@news.uswest.net...
    > We have a computer with Windows 2000 on it, on which we have forgotten
    > all passwords to all accounts (including BIOS setup), effectively
    > rendering this machine useless. However, there is not anything on this
    > computer which we want/need to keep. Therefore, we have decided to try
    > to install Fedora Core 2, as the Windows 2000 install CD has gone
    > missing. Sounds simple enough, BUT:
    >
    > The password resetting tool from
    > http://home.eunet.no/~pnordahl/ntpasswd/bootdisk.html failed to detect
    > the partition it needed to reset the password on, so that was no help on
    > getting into win2000.
    >
    > The boot device order prevents booting from the CD drive as long as
    > there is a bootable hard drive there...and being locked out of the BIOS
    > prevents any alteration to this configuration. (unplugging the hard
    > drive lets us boot the FC2 CD fine...but then there's no HD to install
    > onto...) I've considered flashing BIOS to gain access to the boot device
    > order, but I'm not sure of the manufacturer or any other necessary
    > information for that.
    >
    > We have tried using a Windows 98 boot disk from one of our other
    > computers to reformat the drive (format c:) so as to enable booting from
    > the CD, but to no avail. ("boot failed" is the informative error message
    > it gives.)
    >
    > Does ANYBODY have ANY ideas on how to accomplish this task? Would
    > something like swiping a magnet over the drive work and just require
    > that it be formatted again, or would it be ruined then?
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions!
    >
    > John

    1. Boot the machine with a Win98 boot disk from www.bootdisk.com.
    2. Run fdisk.exe to delete all existing partitions.
    3. If there are some partitions you cannot delete, run delpart.exe
    (http://www.russelltexas.com/delpart.htm).
    4. Load Linux

    Post again if this does not work. There are ways to force a machine to
    boot from a CD. Ideally you should clear the BIOS password, as other
    respondents have suggested. If you don't then you will be caught sooner
    or later. Check the home page of your BIOS supplier for default passwords.

    I
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    mjt wrote:

    > John wrote:
    >
    >> The boot device order prevents booting from the CD drive as long as
    >> there is a bootable hard drive there...and being locked out of the BIOS
    >> prevents any alteration to this configuration.
    >
    > ... most computers these days have a "password reset"
    > feature built into the motherboard. normally it's a
    > jumper that you simply remove (or cover) and boot up.
    > if i were you, i'd open the box up and check for it.
    >
    > unless, of course, you've put a padlock on the computer
    > and have lost that too
    > :)

    if that does not work just take out the bios battery and then
    put it back and job done
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    Darklight wrote:
    > mjt wrote:
    >
    >
    >>John wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>The boot device order prevents booting from the CD drive as long as
    >>>there is a bootable hard drive there...and being locked out of the BIOS
    >>>prevents any alteration to this configuration.
    >>
    >>... most computers these days have a "password reset"
    >>feature built into the motherboard. normally it's a
    >>jumper that you simply remove (or cover) and boot up.
    >>if i were you, i'd open the box up and check for it.
    >>
    >>unless, of course, you've put a padlock on the computer
    >>and have lost that too
    >> :)
    >
    >
    > if that does not work just take out the bios battery and then
    > put it back and job done

    Certainly the simplest approach! And leave the battery out while you
    have a cup of coffee; it takes a while for the stored settings to
    evanesce. Usually a minute or two, but I've seen some boards recommend
    an hour. On restoring the battery, you'll likely have the "system
    defaults", which you can then tailor. And record on parchment in a safe
    deposit box.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,comp.os.linux (More info?)

    John wrote:

    > We have a computer with Windows 2000 on it, on which we have forgotten
    > all passwords to all accounts (including BIOS setup), effectively
    > rendering this machine useless. However, there is not anything on this
    > computer which we want/need to keep. Therefore, we have decided to try
    > to install Fedora Core 2, as the Windows 2000 install CD has gone
    > missing. Sounds simple enough, BUT:
    >
    > The password resetting tool from
    > http://home.eunet.no/~pnordahl/ntpasswd/bootdisk.html failed to detect
    > the partition it needed to reset the password on, so that was no help on
    > getting into win2000.
    >
    > The boot device order prevents booting from the CD drive as long as
    > there is a bootable hard drive there...and being locked out of the BIOS
    > prevents any alteration to this configuration. (unplugging the hard
    > drive lets us boot the FC2 CD fine...but then there's no HD to install
    > onto...) I've considered flashing BIOS to gain access to the boot device
    > order, but I'm not sure of the manufacturer or any other necessary
    > information for that.
    >
    > We have tried using a Windows 98 boot disk from one of our other
    > computers to reformat the drive (format c:) so as to enable booting from
    > the CD, but to no avail. ("boot failed" is the informative error message
    > it gives.)
    >
    > Does ANYBODY have ANY ideas on how to accomplish this task? Would
    > something like swiping a magnet over the drive work and just require
    > that it be formatted again, or would it be ruined then?
    >
    > Thanks for any suggestions!
    >
    > John
    I would suggest taking out your bios battery and jumping the 2 connectors
    with a paperclip or similar item =) works for mine. btw its just a small
    round flat battery usually close to the side of the board.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,comp.os.linux (More info?)

    LJ wrote:
    > John wrote:
    >
    >
    (snip)
    >
    > I would suggest taking out your bios battery and jumping the 2 connectors
    > with a paperclip or similar item =) works for mine. btw its just a small
    > round flat battery usually close to the side of the board.
    >

    Thanks for pointing out that obvious solution that I didn't think of!
    One more question though: Am I correct in thinking the cmos/bios battery
    is the only battery on the motherboard, or would that depend on the
    motherboard? See, there's another problem; I don't have physical access
    to the computer in question at the moment...it's my sister's and I've
    been trying to instruct her on dealing with this long-distance (she's
    away at college). Would she, not knowing what exactly to look for, be
    able to find the battery and remove it without damaging her board,
    assuming it's described properly?

    Also, (one more thing, on account of I'm a curious young fella :) from
    all I've read about CMOS, the battery is what allows it to keep the BIOS
    program stored on it. But, removing the battery doesn't clear the BIOS
    program from the CMOS chip; it simply restores the factory settings it
    had originally. Is that right? So the chip's BIOS program will be there
    whether there's a battery or not, but the options that I set only stay
    there while the battery is in place, assuming it still has some juice?
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,comp.os.linux (More info?)

    ["Followup-To:" header set to comp.os.linux.]
    On Sun, 01 Aug 2004 16:11:54 -0700, John
    <johnches06@netscape.net> wrote:
    > Also, (one more thing, on account of I'm a curious young fella :) from
    > all I've read about CMOS, the battery is what allows it to keep the BIOS
    > program stored on it. But, removing the battery doesn't clear the BIOS
    > program from the CMOS chip; it simply restores the factory settings it
    > had originally. Is that right? So the chip's BIOS program will be there
    > whether there's a battery or not, but the options that I set only stay
    > there while the battery is in place, assuming it still has some juice?

    That's right, removing the battery doesn't clear the BIOS program, just
    the settings. It is possible to change the BIOS program through a
    procedure called "flashing", but I don't think you need to worry about
    that now.

    --
    The truth you speak has no past and no future. It is, and that's all it
    needs to be.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,comp.os.linux (More info?)

    No, this is just a common way of resetting the CMOS to factory default
    settings - including wiping out any passwords in the BIOS. Shouldn't
    hurt anything.

    John wrote:

    > LJ wrote:
    >
    >> John wrote:
    >>
    >>
    > (snip)
    >
    >>
    >> I would suggest taking out your bios battery and jumping the 2
    >> connectors with a paperclip or similar item =) works for mine. btw its
    >> just a small round flat battery usually close to the side of the board.
    >
    >
    > Thanks for pointing out that obvious solution that I didn't think of!
    > One more question though: Am I correct in thinking the cmos/bios battery
    > is the only battery on the motherboard, or would that depend on the
    > motherboard? See, there's another problem; I don't have physical access
    > to the computer in question at the moment...it's my sister's and I've
    > been trying to instruct her on dealing with this long-distance (she's
    > away at college). Would she, not knowing what exactly to look for, be
    > able to find the battery and remove it without damaging her board,
    > assuming it's described properly?
    >
    > Also, (one more thing, on account of I'm a curious young fella :) from
    > all I've read about CMOS, the battery is what allows it to keep the BIOS
    > program stored on it. But, removing the battery doesn't clear the BIOS
    > program from the CMOS chip; it simply restores the factory settings it
    > had originally. Is that right? So the chip's BIOS program will be there
    > whether there's a battery or not, but the options that I set only stay
    > there while the battery is in place, assuming it still has some juice?
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