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Server vs Desktop CPU, 1st time Builder

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March 2, 2007 5:50:37 PM

This is my 1st post and my first attempt at putting together a computer and building my own, pretty psyched! I have been recommended a couple of CPUs, mostly the AMD Opteron series. WHen I was looking on NewEgg they have great deals on the AMD 64 X2 series. To really know what I should buy I need to know :

-What is the difference between a server CPU and a desktop CPU?
-Is there anything else I need to buy for the server CPU?

Any help would be so helpful and greatly appreciated.

Thanks ,
Smiles :) 
March 2, 2007 6:07:07 PM

server cpu goes into a server mobo for 1, it can be a different socket. Usually the chip has been optimized for server applications. This could also means its same old chip in a different package.
March 2, 2007 6:27:54 PM

Quote:
This is my 1st post and my first attempt at putting together a computer and building my own, pretty psyched! I have been recommended a couple of CPUs, mostly the AMD Opteron series. WHen I was looking on NewEgg they have great deals on the AMD 64 X2 series. To really know what I should buy I need to know :

-What is the difference between a server CPU and a desktop CPU?
-Is there anything else I need to buy for the server CPU?

Any help would be so helpful and greatly appreciated.

Thanks ,
Smiles :) 


What is your budget? At the upper-mid to upper-end, Intel Core 2 Duo CPUs are currently the best options.

As to address your question, AM2 is the standard desktop socket AMD is supporting right now. There are Opteron and X2 series that will fit in AM2. The server-only variant of their processors use a different socket, Socket F. Server processors are also spec'ed to be able to run at high usage levels for extended periods of time (desktop CPUs can do it just as well these days, it's just that the server-only variants have been tested to be able to do so).

As to the differences, the Opterons (and FX series) are binned to be the ones using the best silicon. This allows them to operate at a given frequency at a lower voltage and thus run cooler (thus also making them typically better overclockers). That being said, in most cases it will not matter. These energy savings usually only matter at all in high-volume setups where cooling and energy use can really matter over the course of a year.

Also, AMD is in the middle of transitioning from 90nm to 65nm processors. the smaller process size reduces energy use and heat output. The new ones consume less energy than their 90nm counterparts (and there are currently no Opterons on 65nm, only X2s). While some benchmarks appear to have reduced performance compared to older 90nm parts (anywhere from 0-5 or 6%), they do run cooler and overclock just as well as the older versions, but using less power (the new 3600+ has been overclocked regularly to 2.8Ghz on air cooling, it is a 65nm part and costs ~$100). The higher-end X2s are available only on 90nm.

To the point: what is your budget, are you going to overclock, and have you considered Core 2 Duo CPUs?

I think I just rambled -A LOT-. If you want clarification, ask.
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May 14, 2010 6:45:49 PM

for a consumer are they able to run pc games or other multimedia? how does adobe do on server chips or other high demanding software?
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May 14, 2010 7:47:53 PM

dreamer77dd said:
for a consumer are they able to run pc games or other multimedia? how does adobe do on server chips or other high demanding software?


You might have better luck starting a new thread rather than posting on one that's 3 years old. :) 
!