NAS?

Can anyone suggest any good NAS's please?

Thanks
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  1. Define "good".

    How are you going to use it? Do you want shared storage, auto backup, RAID, etc.? Does cost matter? Do you have a 1000Mbps wired, 100Mbps wired, or a wireless network? How many users will be using it? What will they be using if for?

    As I said, define "good."
  2. Quote:
    Do you want shared storage, auto backup, RAID? Does cost matter?


    yes to all.
    Quote:
    Do you have a 1000Mbps wired, 100Mbps wired, or a wireless network?

    100Mbps and wireless
    Quote:
    How many users will be using it? What will they be using it for?

    3 to 4. File backups and sharing
  3. Quote:
    Do you want shared storage, auto backup, RAID? Does cost matter?


    yes to all.
    Quote:
    Do you have a 1000Mbps wired, 100Mbps wired, or a wireless network?

    100Mbps and wireless
    Quote:
    How many users will be using it? What will they be using it for?

    3 to 4. File backups and sharing

    What about performance... and budget?

    Check out Tom's NAS charts for a comparision. But in my opinion, the only reason to buy a pre built NAS is because it is easy or you are 'lazy' I have an infrant readynas 600. It filled my lazy spot, but I am constantly disappointed in the performance. They did some DIY NAS at Tom's too, but on older hardware, with only slightly better performance. I think with PCI-E based system (instead of PCI) you could have much better performance.

    The readynas would hit all your points. I can't speak about other boxes
  4. Quote:
    What about performance... and budget?

    Check out Tom's NAS charts for a comparision.
    Right... answering "yes" doesn't give much actual information.
    Quote:
    But in my opinion, the only reason to buy a pre built NAS is because it is easy or you are 'lazy' I have an infrant readynas 600. It filled my lazy spot, but I am constantly disappointed in the performance. They did some DIY NAS at Tom's too, but on older hardware, with only slightly better performance. I think with PCI-E based system (instead of PCI) you could have much better performance.

    The readynas would hit all your points. I can't speak about other boxes
    Generally good comments for a computer hobbiest comfortable with the inside of their computer.

    However, not everyone is an enthusiast prepared to get out the screwdriver, anti-static wrist strap, and download software; and if they aren't, well, that doesn't mean they are {insert your disparaging term here}.

    There are lots of good reasons to buy a pre-built NAS that have nothing whatsoever to do with being "lazy." Large corporations do it all the time, and they certainly have plenty of qualified people who could convert their old obsolete PCs into RAID NAS boxes.

    One thing I question is the general idea that we all need RAID - everything from drive mirroring to RAID5. The reason RAID exists, mostly, has to due with mission-critical data where the organization cannot afford the loss of ANY data. Most home systems are hardly mission-critical, and automatic nightly, or even weekly (or monthly) backups would do fine.

    But, to each his own.
  5. Quote:

    What about performance...


    Performance was thrown out the window when he said 100 Mb/s and wireless.
  6. Quote:

    However, not everyone is an enthusiast prepared to get out the screwdriver, anti-static wrist strap, and download software; and if they aren't, well, that doesn't mean they are {insert your disparaging term here}.


    Lazy is not disparaging, It just means you don't want to do the work yourself. Try this link. It is OK to be lazy. Computers are there to make it easier to be lazy. :wink:

    I would not discount performance With 1/2 of the reviewed NAS performing at 1/2 the line speed of 100Mb ethernet, it is worth considering. And the worst performing are really bad. 8O

    Risk is another factor in the corporate environment, building your own vs. COTS adds a level of risk. I personally, for my home LAN, would build a NAS before spending another $600 on a Diskless COTS NAS. I own an Infrant ReadyNas 600. It is Slow compared to what can be built for a comparable price. But I'm not staking my reputation on if my NAS works or not. I don't know if I would stake my reputation on the NAS in Tom's rollup either! Most large Corporate IS departments would not consider any of the solutions reviewed at Tom's -- Sorry Tom.

    RAID does not take the place of backups. But there are more reasons for RAID than to support mission critical systems.

    As for my personal review of the ReadyNAS 600:
    Performance transfering from a 4Gb SD card to my photo archive on the ReadyNAS over the 802.11g wireless network ~3.5MB/sec
    Copying from the readyNAS to my Desktop (Gigabit), 1 GB worth of 2 MB files takes about 2-3 minutes or 5.6-8.5 MB/sec
    Backing up 100 GB of data on the ReadyNAS to a 200 GB USB drive connected directly -- 4 DAYS...
    Has issues with permisions when multiple users access files, can be 'fixed' by accessing the administrative tools.
    Was reasonably easy to set up, and has been online for nearly a year with no real problems, except as noted above.
  7. You seem to confuse the general with the specific.
    Quote:
    Lazy is not disparaging,
    In whose lexicon? I've never seen it used as a virtue, except lightheartedly. "Lazy" implies slothfulness. If you meant time efficient, you should have said so
    Quote:
    Risk is another factor in the corporate environment,
    And in the home environment for someone who is not comfortable with the screwdriver, wrist-strap, and with the sides off their computer box.
    Quote:
    I own an Infrant ReadyNas 600. It is Slow compared to what can be built for a comparable price.
    It is also slow compared to what you could buy for a comparable price.
    Quote:
    Most large Corporate IS departments would not consider any of the solutions reviewed at Tom's -- Sorry Tom.
    I didn't say they did - only that they were risk averse with their corporate data, and it is a best silly of you to read that into what I wrote.
    Quote:
    RAID does not take the place of backups.
    Of course it doesn't, which was part of my point.
    Quote:
    But there are more reasons for RAID than to support mission critical systems.
    Such as what, for the home user, please, and in the context of a NAS attached to a 100Mbps / wireless LAN. One of the main functions offered by RAID is to reduce or eliminate the time between data being saved and a hard drive going south, so recovery can be nearly 100%. What percentage of home users would suffer only inconvenience if they had to revert to last nights backup instead of last milliseconds drive mirror?
    Quote:
    Backing up 100 GB of data on the ReadyNAS to a 200 GB USB drive connected directly -- 4 DAYS...
    That is clearly unacceptable, and does not reflect the performance of the NAS box I have experience with; don't know if the performance of the USB port is part of Tom's performance testing; too lazy to go look it up.
    Quote:
    Has issues with permisions when multiple users access files, can be 'fixed' by accessing the administrative tools.
    Was reasonably easy to set up, and has been online for nearly a year with no real problems, except as noted above.
    The only small NAS appliance I have personal experience with is the Buffalo LinkStation Pro. I put that in at the request of a client. It works very well; online performance is reasonable - 70-80Mbps on a 100Mbps LAN (using crude wrist-watch large file copy timing), and full backups to the attached USB drive complete very quickly. It is a bit pricey, but not too bad (~$180 including the 250GB drive). Setup is easy, even with user-access permissions on the folders. The biggest setup problem is with Windows, not with the NAS. This was a Workgroup environment, non-domain, but including one Mac along with the PCs.

    Sure, for the same money a hobbiest / enthusiast could put together a much more capable box if he does not count the cost of the old PC. But doing that is not everyone's cup of tea.

    But, here we have hijacked this thread with our own discussion. Maybe the OP could provide a bit more detail on his requirements.
  8. Be glad to.
    I want a 100Mbps NAS, with ethenet (obviously), in the region of 500GB to 1TB.
    It will need RAID, 'cos I want to use it for file Backups.
    Anything else?
  9. .5 to 1TB... is that your primary storage requirement or the size of the RAID array?

    Do you need anything other than RAID1 (drive mirroring)?
  10. Quote:
    .5 to 1TB... is that your primary storage requirement or the size of the RAID array?

    Do you need anything other than RAID1 (drive mirroring)?

    Primary storge requirement
    Just RAID 1
  11. I'm personally in favor of making your own NAS, but I'm extremely comfortable building and fixing computers. My home built linux box has a 1.6 TB capacity and transfers files over my gigabit network at 40-50 MB/s. That's bytes, so it would be 320-400 Mb/s.

    Reasons to buy a NAS:
    You don't want to have to make the darn thing
    You want a nice sleek box, an old computer definitely doesn't fit this
    You care more about your electricity bill than the initial cost
    All of these qualities are more important to you than sheer performance

    mbonwick, which would you rather do? We can either recommend an off the shelf solution or help you putting together parts for a homebrew NAS.
  12. Would definately prefer an off-the-shelf solution.
    I've had a look at some of Maxtor's Shared Storage series. Are they any good?
  13. Quote:
    Reasons to buy a NAS:
    You don't want to have to make the darn thing
    You want a nice sleek box, an old computer definitely doesn't fit this
    You care more about your electricity bill than the initial cost
    All of these qualities are more important to you than sheer performance


    I would also add power savings to the list. I bet a lot of home brew NASs are made by guys who think they are saving $$$, and they are in up front costs. But when you consider the cost of operation, that frugality might be misplaced.
  14. Quote:
    Reasons to buy a NAS:
    You don't want to have to make the darn thing
    You want a nice sleek box, an old computer definitely doesn't fit this
    You care more about your electricity bill than the initial cost
    All of these qualities are more important to you than sheer performance


    I would also add power savings to the list. I bet a lot of home brew NASs are made by guys who think they are saving $$$, and they are in up front costs. But when you consider the cost of operation, that frugality might be misplaced.

    That would be why I put it in the list already. What do you think the line about your electricity bill means?
  15. Can we please get back on topic..and suggest some NAS's to me?
  16. I have no experience, and hence no recommendation, with a home NAS appliance with 1TB of primary storage plus RAID 1 (2TB total storage).

    Have you checked out the NAS charts on Small Net Builder, as previously suggested (the guy behind Tom's Networking site has recently re-parted ways with Tom's Hardware and re-established his own site)?

    Small Net Builder also has a number of reviews on NAS devices.
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