What does the "Repair" process do?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

In the Win2k install/setup process, the very first screen
offers the following three options:
- To set up Windows 2000 now, press ENTER.
- To repair a Windows 2000 installation, press R.
- To quit Setup without installing Windows 2000, press F3.

What *exactly* will the "repair" ("R") option do? Also,
what will it not do?

The reason I ask is because my PC crashes (with an error
screen that says there's a hardware failure) about half-
way through the boot process, but the HDD is not making
any nasty grinding noises, so I am hopeful there is only a
minor (i.e., repairable) problem. Regardless of what's
wrong with the HDD, my main goal is to recover my old data
files (if possible). If I can repair the OS and restore
all previous function that would be great, but that's
secondary to recovering the data. My worry is that my
repair efforts will accidentally make my data files
unavailable, so I want to learn as much as possible about
the "repair" option before I try using it. I know
virtually nothing about repairing Win2k, so I don't want
to get in over my head and cause more damage than has
already occurred.

Thanks.
7 answers Last reply
More about what repair process
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    Dougg

    What does them error message say, *exactly*?

    It might not be your hard disk at all.

    Is it "Hardware malfunction"?

    In that case, see if this MS Knowledge Base article can help you:

    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=222973

    Best regards

    Bjorn
    --
    Bjorn Landemoo - mvp2@landemoo.com - http://landemoo.com/
    Microsoft MVP (Windows Server - File System)

    "Doug" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >In the Win2k install/setup process, the very first screen
    >offers the following three options:
    >- To set up Windows 2000 now, press ENTER.
    >- To repair a Windows 2000 installation, press R.
    >- To quit Setup without installing Windows 2000, press F3.
    >
    >What *exactly* will the "repair" ("R") option do? Also,
    >what will it not do?
    >
    >The reason I ask is because my PC crashes (with an error
    >screen that says there's a hardware failure) about half-
    >way through the boot process, but the HDD is not making
    >any nasty grinding noises, so I am hopeful there is only a
    >minor (i.e., repairable) problem. Regardless of what's
    >wrong with the HDD, my main goal is to recover my old data
    >files (if possible). If I can repair the OS and restore
    >all previous function that would be great, but that's
    >secondary to recovering the data. My worry is that my
    >repair efforts will accidentally make my data files
    >unavailable, so I want to learn as much as possible about
    >the "repair" option before I try using it. I know
    >virtually nothing about repairing Win2k, so I don't want
    >to get in over my head and cause more damage than has
    >already occurred.
    >
    >Thanks.
    >
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    Thanks for the good article, Bjorn, but I don't think it
    will help me.

    My PC's hardware malfunction went like this. I was
    working on my computer, writing an email I think, when the
    hard drive suddenly began to make a loud noise, like it
    was repeatedly trying (and failing) to read the same spot
    on the disk. It just kept repeating, so, after listening
    to this horrible sound for maybe a dozen cycles, I pulled
    the power cord and removed the battery. I then replaced
    the battery and started the machine. The hard drive
    seemed to spin up normally and began to boot, but about
    half-way through the boot process the loud noise began
    again. This time, I let it cycle until it stopped and
    displayed an error message, which said there was a
    hardware failure and that I should remove any new hardware
    and try again (sorry, I don't remember the exact
    language). Well, I had not installed any new hardware, so
    I pulled the battery and tried again. Again, the HDD
    seemed to spin up normally until about half-way through
    the boot process, and the noise and error message
    repeated. Based on this behavior, I'm guessing there's a
    bad spot on the HDD that has corrupted a system file, but
    I'm no expert so if there are other ideas please let me
    know. I have not yet done any diagnostics, such as
    removing the extra RAM I installed 2 years ago, so I
    suppose it could be anything. However, the computer is
    about 3 years old and has been in daily, fairly heavy, use
    for about 2.5 years, which again seems to me to point to
    the HDD.

    Thoughts?

    Doug


    >Dougg
    >
    >What does them error message say, *exactly*?
    >
    >It might not be your hard disk at all.
    >
    >Is it "Hardware malfunction"?
    >
    >In that case, see if this MS Knowledge Base article can
    help you:
    >
    >http://support.microsoft.com/?id=222973
    >
    >Best regards
    >
    >Bjorn
    >--
    >Bjorn Landemoo - mvp2@landemoo.com - http://landemoo.com/
    >Microsoft MVP (Windows Server - File System)
    >
    >"Doug" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    >
    >>In the Win2k install/setup process, the very first
    screen
    >>offers the following three options:
    >>- To set up Windows 2000 now, press ENTER.
    >>- To repair a Windows 2000 installation, press R.
    >>- To quit Setup without installing Windows 2000, press
    F3.
    >>
    >>What *exactly* will the "repair" ("R") option do? Also,
    >>what will it not do?
    >>
    >>The reason I ask is because my PC crashes (with an error
    >>screen that says there's a hardware failure) about half-
    >>way through the boot process, but the HDD is not making
    >>any nasty grinding noises, so I am hopeful there is only
    a
    >>minor (i.e., repairable) problem. Regardless of what's
    >>wrong with the HDD, my main goal is to recover my old
    data
    >>files (if possible). If I can repair the OS and restore
    >>all previous function that would be great, but that's
    >>secondary to recovering the data. My worry is that my
    >>repair efforts will accidentally make my data files
    >>unavailable, so I want to learn as much as possible
    about
    >>the "repair" option before I try using it. I know
    >>virtually nothing about repairing Win2k, so I don't want
    >>to get in over my head and cause more damage than has
    >>already occurred.
    >>
    >>Thanks.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >.
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    Doug - if you are absolutely certain the hard drive is making that
    noise, that's usually very bad news. You might download the drive
    manufacturer's bootable diagnostic diskette image and see what info it
    offers. You might also try a fresh BIOS scan if possible, on the chance
    that BIOS will change its mind about whether that drive is functional
    (not sure whether that'll change anything; that may be a purely
    electronic transaction between BIOS and the drive's own built-in
    electronics.) I'd also talk to the drive manu's tech support people
    right away; they may be able to offer some useful recovery advice and
    most likely will quickly replace the drive - warranties run for years.

    I'd make absolutely certain of the noise source, despite the W2k error
    msgs.

    It's very unlikely that any W2k setting, or RAM anomaly, would cause a
    horrible grinding noise. If in fact it's software-caused, it's rogue
    software of a seldom seen sort. For example, something causing an
    endless loop of highspeed consecutive read-accesses to immediately
    adjacent tracks. I don't have any idea what W2k would make of this,
    or evem whether it would notice. If you have a bootable DOS diskette
    handy you might see if using that also causes the noise.

    Doug wrote:

    > Thanks for the good article, Bjorn, but I don't think it
    > will help me.
    >
    > My PC's hardware malfunction went like this. I was
    > working on my computer, writing an email I think, when the
    > hard drive suddenly began to make a loud noise, like it
    > was repeatedly trying (and failing) to read the same spot
    > on the disk. It just kept repeating, so, after listening
    > to this horrible sound for maybe a dozen cycles, I pulled
    > the power cord and removed the battery. I then replaced
    > the battery and started the machine. The hard drive
    > seemed to spin up normally and began to boot, but about
    > half-way through the boot process the loud noise began
    > again. This time, I let it cycle until it stopped and
    > displayed an error message, which said there was a
    > hardware failure and that I should remove any new hardware
    > and try again (sorry, I don't remember the exact
    > language). Well, I had not installed any new hardware, so
    > I pulled the battery and tried again. Again, the HDD
    > seemed to spin up normally until about half-way through
    > the boot process, and the noise and error message
    > repeated. Based on this behavior, I'm guessing there's a
    > bad spot on the HDD that has corrupted a system file, but
    > I'm no expert so if there are other ideas please let me
    > know. I have not yet done any diagnostics, such as
    > removing the extra RAM I installed 2 years ago, so I
    > suppose it could be anything. However, the computer is
    > about 3 years old and has been in daily, fairly heavy, use
    > for about 2.5 years, which again seems to me to point to
    > the HDD.
    >
    > Thoughts?
    >
    > Doug
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>Dougg
    >>
    >>What does them error message say, *exactly*?
    >>
    >>It might not be your hard disk at all.
    >>
    >>Is it "Hardware malfunction"?
    >>
    >>In that case, see if this MS Knowledge Base article can
    >
    > help you:
    >
    >>http://support.microsoft.com/?id=222973
    >>
    >>Best regards
    >>
    >>Bjorn
    >>--
    >>Bjorn Landemoo - mvp2@landemoo.com - http://landemoo.com/
    >>Microsoft MVP (Windows Server - File System)
    >>
    >>"Doug" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>In the Win2k install/setup process, the very first
    >
    > screen
    >
    >>>offers the following three options:
    >>>- To set up Windows 2000 now, press ENTER.
    >>>- To repair a Windows 2000 installation, press R.
    >>>- To quit Setup without installing Windows 2000, press
    >
    > F3.
    >
    >>>What *exactly* will the "repair" ("R") option do? Also,
    >>>what will it not do?
    >>>
    >>>The reason I ask is because my PC crashes (with an error
    >>>screen that says there's a hardware failure) about half-
    >>>way through the boot process, but the HDD is not making
    >>>any nasty grinding noises, so I am hopeful there is only
    >
    > a
    >
    >>>minor (i.e., repairable) problem. Regardless of what's
    >>>wrong with the HDD, my main goal is to recover my old
    >
    > data
    >
    >>>files (if possible). If I can repair the OS and restore
    >>>all previous function that would be great, but that's
    >>>secondary to recovering the data. My worry is that my
    >>>repair efforts will accidentally make my data files
    >>>unavailable, so I want to learn as much as possible
    >
    > about
    >
    >>>the "repair" option before I try using it. I know
    >>>virtually nothing about repairing Win2k, so I don't want
    >>>to get in over my head and cause more damage than has
    >>>already occurred.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>.
    >>
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    Doug

    Dan has sound advice. I would like to add that a Windows Repair operation
    will not help in this case. If you are lucky, some contents from your hard
    disk can be saved by attaching it to another computer (you might need an
    adaptor for this) and simply copy over the accessible content to the other
    computer.

    Best regards

    Bjorn
    --
    Bjorn Landemoo - mvp2@landemoo.com - http://landemoo.com/
    Microsoft MVP (Windows Server - File System)

    "Doug" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >Thanks for the good article, Bjorn, but I don't think it
    >will help me.
    >
    >My PC's hardware malfunction went like this. I was
    >working on my computer, writing an email I think, when the
    >hard drive suddenly began to make a loud noise, like it
    >was repeatedly trying (and failing) to read the same spot
    >on the disk. It just kept repeating, so, after listening
    >to this horrible sound for maybe a dozen cycles, I pulled
    >the power cord and removed the battery. I then replaced
    >the battery and started the machine. The hard drive
    >seemed to spin up normally and began to boot, but about
    >half-way through the boot process the loud noise began
    >again. This time, I let it cycle until it stopped and
    >displayed an error message, which said there was a
    >hardware failure and that I should remove any new hardware
    >and try again (sorry, I don't remember the exact
    >language). Well, I had not installed any new hardware, so
    >I pulled the battery and tried again. Again, the HDD
    >seemed to spin up normally until about half-way through
    >the boot process, and the noise and error message
    >repeated. Based on this behavior, I'm guessing there's a
    >bad spot on the HDD that has corrupted a system file, but
    >I'm no expert so if there are other ideas please let me
    >know. I have not yet done any diagnostics, such as
    >removing the extra RAM I installed 2 years ago, so I
    >suppose it could be anything. However, the computer is
    >about 3 years old and has been in daily, fairly heavy, use
    >for about 2.5 years, which again seems to me to point to
    >the HDD.
    >
    >Thoughts?
    >
    >Doug
    >
    >
    >
    >>Dougg
    >>
    >>What does them error message say, *exactly*?
    >>
    >>It might not be your hard disk at all.
    >>
    >>Is it "Hardware malfunction"?
    >>
    >>In that case, see if this MS Knowledge Base article can
    >help you:
    >>
    >>http://support.microsoft.com/?id=222973
    >>
    >>Best regards
    >>
    >>Bjorn
    >>--
    >>Bjorn Landemoo - mvp2@landemoo.com - http://landemoo.com/
    >>Microsoft MVP (Windows Server - File System)
    >>
    >>"Doug" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>>In the Win2k install/setup process, the very first
    >screen
    >>>offers the following three options:
    >>>- To set up Windows 2000 now, press ENTER.
    >>>- To repair a Windows 2000 installation, press R.
    >>>- To quit Setup without installing Windows 2000, press
    >F3.
    >>>
    >>>What *exactly* will the "repair" ("R") option do? Also,
    >>>what will it not do?
    >>>
    >>>The reason I ask is because my PC crashes (with an error
    >>>screen that says there's a hardware failure) about half-
    >>>way through the boot process, but the HDD is not making
    >>>any nasty grinding noises, so I am hopeful there is only
    >a
    >>>minor (i.e., repairable) problem. Regardless of what's
    >>>wrong with the HDD, my main goal is to recover my old
    >data
    >>>files (if possible). If I can repair the OS and restore
    >>>all previous function that would be great, but that's
    >>>secondary to recovering the data. My worry is that my
    >>>repair efforts will accidentally make my data files
    >>>unavailable, so I want to learn as much as possible
    >about
    >>>the "repair" option before I try using it. I know
    >>>virtually nothing about repairing Win2k, so I don't want
    >>>to get in over my head and cause more damage than has
    >>>already occurred.
    >>>
    >>>Thanks.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>.
    >>
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    Just a thought, -if you haven't tried it already... boot
    from a floppy, if you have the w2k boot disks... (you'll
    have to do all four) and select Repair and "Console". This
    will get you a 'dos prompt' that you can run "CHKDSK"
    from, and maybe repair the bad place on yr HDD.

    I would get a new HDD installed, format it up, install
    W2K, and go at that way- you need a place to put your
    recovered data when you get it.

    Good Luck-


    >-----Original Message-----
    >Thanks for the good article, Bjorn, but I don't think it
    >will help me.
    >
    >My PC's hardware malfunction went like this. I was
    >working on my computer, writing an email I think, when
    the
    >hard drive suddenly began to make a loud noise, like it
    >was repeatedly trying (and failing) to read the same spot
    >on the disk.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    Thanks everyone for your helpful tips!

    Based on your suggestions, here's what I propose to do, if
    it makes the most sense:
    1. Remove the old HDD and replace it with a new one.
    2. Install W2k on the new HDD, which should return my PC
    to basic operation.
    3. My PC (laptop) doesn't have room internally for a 2nd
    HDD, so I'll put the old HDD into an external USB drive
    enclosure.
    4. Plug the external drive enclosure (containing the old
    HDD) into a USB port on my PC and try to offload as many
    files as I can from the old HDD.

    This last step is more questionable:
    5. Swap the old HDD back into my PC and try to repair its
    boot sequence, with the goal of trying to create a
    bootable image of the old HDD that could be loaded onto
    the new HDD to save me the ordeal of re-loading all my
    programs.

    Comments? I included step 5 because I don't know how to
    restore the program files if I stop at step 4.

    Doug
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

    Doug

    Your main plan seems sound. However, I would not expect step 5 to work, if
    there are hardware errors on your disk. If you can get to most of your data
    files in step 4, this would be a very good outcome.

    Applications would most probably need to be reinstalled, they are not only
    the files in the application folder, but also registry entries and often
    other files spewed all over the system partition.

    It isn't the boot sequence that needs a repair, it obviously works until a
    hardware problem denies access to system files, but rather a part of your
    hard disk where Win2000 system files are stored. This MS Knowledge Base
    article describes better what the repair options does:

    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=238359

    When you go and buy hard disks, buy two, one for the machine and the other
    one for performing regular backups in order to avoid to lose data next time
    a failure or data loss occurs.

    Best regards

    Bjorn
    --
    Bjorn Landemoo - mvp2@landemoo.com - http://landemoo.com/
    Microsoft MVP (Windows Server - File System)

    "Doug" <anonymous@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote:

    >Thanks everyone for your helpful tips!
    >
    >Based on your suggestions, here's what I propose to do, if
    >it makes the most sense:
    > 1. Remove the old HDD and replace it with a new one.
    > 2. Install W2k on the new HDD, which should return my PC
    >to basic operation.
    > 3. My PC (laptop) doesn't have room internally for a 2nd
    >HDD, so I'll put the old HDD into an external USB drive
    >enclosure.
    > 4. Plug the external drive enclosure (containing the old
    >HDD) into a USB port on my PC and try to offload as many
    >files as I can from the old HDD.
    >
    >This last step is more questionable:
    > 5. Swap the old HDD back into my PC and try to repair its
    >boot sequence, with the goal of trying to create a
    >bootable image of the old HDD that could be loaded onto
    >the new HDD to save me the ordeal of re-loading all my
    >programs.
    >
    >Comments? I included step 5 because I don't know how to
    >restore the program files if I stop at step 4.
    >
    >Doug
    >
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