Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Samsung HDTV, DLP

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
August 31, 2004 4:19:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They sold all
kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable box and DVD, $200
surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable company said they were
not necessary. Please help with your opinions. Thanks, Joan

More about : samsung hdtv dlp

Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
August 31, 2004 6:42:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Joan and Al wrote:
> Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They sold all
> kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable box and DVD, $200
> surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable company said they were
> not necessary. Please help with your opinions. Thanks, Joan

You need decent cables, but at Best Buy you probably spent several times
what you actually needed to. You certainly don't need anything with a
major brand name on it (like Monster, for example). Walmart has some
decent cables on their shelves at reasonable prices. You can do even
better by shopping on the web. I can't see any reason for a surge
suppressor. My Samsung is plugged directly into the wall.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
August 31, 2004 10:37:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
news:vNmdnYa25oYPW6ncRVn-rQ@adelphia.com...
> Joan and Al wrote:
> > Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They sold
all
> > kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable box and DVD,
$200
> > surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable company said they
were
> > not necessary. Please help with your opinions. Thanks, Joan
>
> You need decent cables, but at Best Buy you probably spent several times
> what you actually needed to. You certainly don't need anything with a
> major brand name on it (like Monster, for example). Walmart has some
> decent cables on their shelves at reasonable prices. You can do even
> better by shopping on the web. I can't see any reason for a surge
> suppressor. My Samsung is plugged directly into the wall.

I can see a reason for surge suppressors in my shop right now. I can hardly
move. Our business doubles or triples in the shop when the thunderstorms
hit.

Leonard
Related resources
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
August 31, 2004 10:37:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <R28Zc.37399$bT1.31266@fed1read07>, no@no.com says...
> I can see a reason for surge suppressors in my shop right now. I can hardly
> move. Our business doubles or triples in the shop when the thunderstorms
> hit.

What part of the country are you in, Leonard? I've often thought
that the need for surge suppression might vary greatly by location.
Here in the metro L.A. area, we see so little lightening compared to
places like the midwest where they have real storms. The worst
damage I've seen here is due to opposite effect -- low voltage. I've
seen a lot of fried fridges from running on 80 volts during summer
brownouts.
September 1, 2004 1:38:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

While not exactly a scam, items like that have huge markups, so it's
possible BB made almost as much from selling you $200 worth of accessories
as they did off the TV. Oh I just reread, I thought you bought them,
nevermind, not buying them is the right choice then shopping around for what
you need online later.

"Joan and Al" <jraynes@cfl.rr.com> wrote in message
news:m1_Yc.2368$Of3.321@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
> Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They sold
> all
> kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable box and DVD,
> $200
> surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable company said they were
> not necessary. Please help with your opinions. Thanks, Joan
>
>
>
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 1:38:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 31 Aug 2004 21:38:22 +0000, Rob wrote:

> While not exactly a scam, items like that have huge markups, so it's
> possible BB made almost as much from selling you $200 worth of
> accessories as they did off the TV. Oh I just reread, I thought you
> bought them, nevermind, not buying them is the right choice then
> shopping around for what you need online later.
>
> "Joan and Al" <jraynes@cfl.rr.com> wrote in message
> news:m1_Yc.2368$Of3.321@tornado.tampabay.rr.com...
>> Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They sold
>> all
>> kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable box and DVD,
>> $200
>> surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable company said they
>> were not necessary. Please help with your opinions. Thanks, Joan
>>
>>
>>
If it makes you feel better then buy a $20 powerstrip but don't buy the
overpriced power conditioner that Best Buy is pushing (they tried to sell
it to me also). The only kind of surge suppressor that can possible
protect you from a lighting strike is one that's connected between the
powerlines that enter your house and a good solid true ground (a big fat
rod that's driven deep into the ground). Telephone connections have these,
I don't know if powerlines do. The ground wire in your house wiring is too
long to do you any good, it's there to keep you from electrocuting
yourself not for lightning strikes. If your powerlines are hit by lighting
then kiss everything goodbye, the solution is home owners insurance not
surge surpressors. A UPS is fine for riding out short blackouts, I have
them on all of my computers but not on my HDTV. You don't need one for
power conditioning. The power supply in the TV can handle the normal
voltage variations, chances are it can handle huge variations. Modern
power supplies are designed to work all over the world with just a
different cord for each market. The range required is 90V 60Hz (brown out
conditions in America) to 240V 50Hz (UK). Cheap PC power supplies can do
this so I expect that the ones in HD sets can t, therefore you don't need
any power conditioning. You do want a DVI cable, I don't know if Best
Buy's prices are worse than CompUSA or Radio Shack.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 1:55:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Chris Thomas" <cthomas@mminternet.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1b9ec6d7c872a66a989864@news.mminternet.com...
> In article <R28Zc.37399$bT1.31266@fed1read07>, no@no.com says...
> > I can see a reason for surge suppressors in my shop right now. I can
hardly
> > move. Our business doubles or triples in the shop when the
thunderstorms
> > hit.
>
> What part of the country are you in, Leonard? I've often thought
> that the need for surge suppression might vary greatly by location.
> Here in the metro L.A. area, we see so little lightening compared to
> places like the midwest where they have real storms. The worst
> damage I've seen here is due to opposite effect -- low voltage. I've
> seen a lot of fried fridges from running on 80 volts during summer
> brownouts.

We are in the worst place in the country, north central Florida.

Most modern consumer video equipment uses switching power supplies and will
work fine on varying voltages and completely convert any low level line
noise. Extended use on low line voltage will cause overheating, but short
term drops are rarely an issue. Things like refrigerators or air
conditioners with motors are much more likely to be damaged by a brownout.
The bigger problem in your case may be transients from switching in the grid
or when the power comes back up. You may be fine without protection.

Leonard
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 2:33:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Jim Gilliland <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in
news:vNmdnYa25oYPW6ncRVn-rQ@adelphia.com:

> Joan and Al wrote:
>> Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They
>> sold all kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable
>> box and DVD, $200 surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable
>> company said they were not necessary. Please help with your opinions.
>> Thanks, Joan
>
> You need decent cables, but at Best Buy you probably spent several
> times what you actually needed to. You certainly don't need anything
> with a major brand name on it (like Monster, for example). Walmart
> has some decent cables on their shelves at reasonable prices. You can
> do even better by shopping on the web. I can't see any reason for a
> surge suppressor. My Samsung is plugged directly into the wall.

Surge suppressors and UPS's with built-in surge suppression have saved my
bacon more than once. Mind you, I've been living, up until last year, in
a fairly suburban area that is subject to ice storms and thunderstorms.


--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 11:28:05 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Leonard Caillouet wrote:


> I can see a reason for surge suppressors in my shop right now. I can hardly
> move. Our business doubles or triples in the shop when the thunderstorms
> hit.

Leonard,

And in the case of TV's with bulbs such as the DLP's being discussed a
UPS will allow the set to shutdown with normal fan(s) running, etc, on a
loss of power. And of course, on a brief loss of power the UPS will
prevent the set being exposed to the various transients and voltage
spikes associated with the restoration of power.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 11:36:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jsheldon" <jsheldonNOTTTHIS@his.com> wrote in message
news:4135b246$1@news101.his.com...

> Leonard Caillouet wrote:

> > I can see a reason for surge suppressors in my shop right now. I can
hardly
> > move. Our business doubles or triples in the shop when the
thunderstorms
> > hit.
>
> Leonard,
>
> And in the case of TV's with bulbs such as the DLP's being discussed a
> UPS will allow the set to shutdown with normal fan(s) running, etc, on a
> loss of power. And of course, on a brief loss of power the UPS will
> prevent the set being exposed to the various transients and voltage
> spikes associated with the restoration of power.

A UPS can be useful for maintaining the fans, but not all of them have
effective surge suppression. Also, the output of most of them make the line
noise that power conditioners are claimed to reduce look clean by
comparison. I would check out the suppression characteristics and not
assume that all UPSs are effective in this regard.

Like everything else, never assume anything, nor overgeneralize the effects
of any type of equipment.

Leonard
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 11:41:10 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Dave Oldridge wrote:
> Jim Gilliland <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in
> news:vNmdnYa25oYPW6ncRVn-rQ@adelphia.com:
>
>>Joan and Al wrote:
>>
>>>Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They
>>>sold all kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable
>>>box and DVD, $200 surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable
>>>company said they were not necessary. Please help with your opinions.
>>>Thanks, Joan
>>
>>You need decent cables, but at Best Buy you probably spent several
>>times what you actually needed to. You certainly don't need anything
>>with a major brand name on it (like Monster, for example). Walmart
>>has some decent cables on their shelves at reasonable prices. You can
>>do even better by shopping on the web. I can't see any reason for a
>>surge suppressor. My Samsung is plugged directly into the wall.
>
> Surge suppressors and UPS's with built-in surge suppression have saved my
> bacon more than once. Mind you, I've been living, up until last year, in
> a fairly suburban area that is subject to ice storms and thunderstorms.

How do you know that? I live in Cleveland's suburbs, which sounds a lot
like the area that you describe. I have quite a few power strips with
surge suppressors in them, but I see no evidence that they've ever saved
me from anything. The MOVs that they use to absorb surges aren't going
to protect you from a direct lightning strike.

Some of them "guarantee" that they will protect you from
lightning-induced spikes, but charge a very high price for that
"guarantee". What they're really selling you is insurance - they know
how unlikely it is that lightning will damage your set, so by charging a
high enough price for the "protection", they can afford to offer such
coverage, paying for those few instances where damage actually occurs
(and where the owner can properly document that all the terms of the
"guarantee" have been met).

In any event, putting a $200 surge suppressor on a $4000 TV suggests
that you think there is a better than 1 in 20 chance that your set will
be damaged by lightning. I think your odds of being damaged are several
orders of magnitude lower than that.
September 1, 2004 5:22:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I read the other post against surge protectors. I'm one of the unfortunate
ones who found out the hard way. I used to keep my TV plugged into the wall,
went on vacation and when I came back it was dead. Turns out either
lightening or spike messed it up and cost me a little over 300 bucks. While
I agree the cables are overpriced I would advise from my own experience to
get some kind of surge protector even if it's not the one that covers 7
bizillion bucks worth of damage. Personally speaking, it's like
insurance...you may never use it but if you need it, you'll be glad you have
it.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 5:22:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

abe wrote:
> I read the other post against surge protectors. I'm one of the unfortunate
> ones who found out the hard way. I used to keep my TV plugged into the wall,
> went on vacation and when I came back it was dead. Turns out either
> lightening or spike messed it up and cost me a little over 300 bucks. While
> I agree the cables are overpriced I would advise from my own experience to
> get some kind of surge protector even if it's not the one that covers 7
> bizillion bucks worth of damage. Personally speaking, it's like
> insurance...you may never use it but if you need it, you'll be glad you have
> it.

But you've just proved the point. You could have spent $200 on the Best
Buy power protection that we're discussing here. Or you could have
taken your chances on a $300 repair. Based upon those numbers (which
may not be right in every case), you'd need to expect that one out of
every two sets sold will suffer a lightning strike to make the purchase
of a protector worthwhile. Clearly, the odds of being struck by
lightning are far lower than that, so it's generally worth it to take
the risk. You were one of the unlucky ones, but most owners will never
have to make that repair.

Now, if you could get adequate surge protection for somewhere in the
range of $2-$20, then I'd say it might be money well spent. But $200?
No way.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 5:22:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 09:43:15 -0400, Jim Gilliland wrote:

> abe wrote:
>> I read the other post against surge protectors. I'm one of the unfortunate
>> ones who found out the hard way. I used to keep my TV plugged into the wall,
>> went on vacation and when I came back it was dead. Turns out either
>> lightening or spike messed it up and cost me a little over 300 bucks. While
>> I agree the cables are overpriced I would advise from my own experience to
>> get some kind of surge protector even if it's not the one that covers 7
>> bizillion bucks worth of damage. Personally speaking, it's like
>> insurance...you may never use it but if you need it, you'll be glad you have
>> it.
>
> But you've just proved the point. You could have spent $200 on the Best
> Buy power protection that we're discussing here. Or you could have
> taken your chances on a $300 repair. Based upon those numbers (which
> may not be right in every case), you'd need to expect that one out of
> every two sets sold will suffer a lightning strike to make the purchase
> of a protector worthwhile. Clearly, the odds of being struck by
> lightning are far lower than that, so it's generally worth it to take
> the risk. You were one of the unlucky ones, but most owners will never
> have to make that repair.
>
> Now, if you could get adequate surge protection for somewhere in the
> range of $2-$20, then I'd say it might be money well spent. But $200?
> No way.

The $10 power strips will do everything the $200 ones will do (which
is handle a small spike not a direct lightning strike). The power strips
justify themselves because they provide you with the outlets you need, and
the switch is nice too. If the surge suppressor actually accomplishes
anything then that's a bonus but don't count on it actually protecting
your equipment. The more expensive power strips, the $25 ones, are just
selling overpriced insurance policies. You already have homeowners
insurance so you don't need that. A $200 power strip is an out and out
scam, you might as well send your money to Nigeria.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 9:05:31 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <uqOdnWho08jEKKjcRVn-ug@adelphia.com>,
usemylastname@cheerful.com says...
> Dave Oldridge wrote:
>...
> How do you know that? I live in Cleveland's suburbs, which sounds a lot
> like the area that you describe. I have quite a few power strips with
> surge suppressors in them, but I see no evidence that they've ever saved
> me from anything. The MOVs that they use to absorb surges aren't going
> to protect you from a direct lightning strike.
> ...


Note that one doesn't need a "direct strike" to induce sufficient
voltage in one wiring to do significant damage. I used to live on a
boat. The low-frequency antenna lead-in ran over my bunk. (For the
techies, it was an inverted-L antenna, resonant on about 1.6 mHz, so
it was good sized). I had installed an old-fashioned spark-gap
protector in the feed line, set to arc over at about 300v. During
lightening storms, when the lightening was a mile away (5 secs
between flash and thunder), I would hear a tic (eg, arc over) from
the spark gap synchronized with every flash. So if you have a bunch
of power-line wire on your electronics, or telephone line on your
modem, or whatever, it may well get fried by any nearby lightening.
The million or so amps in a lightening strike will enduce substantial
current in parallel wiring at distances of thousands of yards.

/Chris, AA6SQ
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 9:26:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
news:vNmdnYa25oYPW6ncRVn-rQ@adelphia.com...
> Joan and Al wrote:
> > Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They sold
all
> > kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable box and DVD,
$200
> > surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable company said they
were
> > not necessary. Please help with your opinions. Thanks, Joan
>
> You need decent cables, but at Best Buy you probably spent several times
> what you actually needed to. You certainly don't need anything with a
> major brand name on it (like Monster, for example). Walmart has some
> decent cables on their shelves at reasonable prices. You can do even
> better by shopping on the web. I can't see any reason for a surge
> suppressor. My Samsung is plugged directly into the wall.

Yes, surge suppressors are mysterious things - - you never know if they have
done anything good until you take it out and find your equipment no longer
operational. I have a 21" Sony TV that operated for about a year until one
day it would not turn on. It was within its warranty period, so I took it to
a qualified repair shop where it was put back in service. I took it home and
it worked fine for 3 days and then would not turn on (again). The repair man
was mighty irked, but he again replaced the blown components, and this time
he said I should get a good surge suppressor for it. I did, and that was
about 10 year ago. It's been fine. Do I still need a surge suppressor? I
don't know. Am I going to take the suppressor out to see? Hell no.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 1, 2004 9:32:17 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
news:vNmdnYa25oYPW6ncRVn-rQ@adelphia.com...
> Joan and Al wrote:
> > Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They sold
all
> > kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable box and DVD,
$200
> > surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam. Cable company said they
were
> > not necessary. Please help with your opinions. Thanks, Joan
>
> You need decent cables, but at Best Buy you probably spent several times
> what you actually needed to. You certainly don't need anything with a
> major brand name on it (like Monster, for example). Walmart has some
> decent cables on their shelves at reasonable prices. You can do even
> better by shopping on the web. I can't see any reason for a surge
> suppressor. My Samsung is plugged directly into the wall.

My service provider reports this post not available, so I'm posting it
again.

Yes, surge suppressors are mysterious things - - you never know if they have
done anything good until you take it out and find your equipment no longer
operational. I have a 21" Sony TV that operated for about a year until one
day it would not turn on. It was within its warranty period, so I took it to
a qualified repair shop where it was put back in service. I took it home and
it worked fine for 3 days and then would not turn on (again). The repair man
was mighty irked, but he again replaced the blown components, and this time
he said I should get a good surge suppressor for it. I did, and that was
about 10 year ago. It's been fine. Do I still need a surge suppressor? I
don't know. Am I going to take the suppressor out to see? Hell no.
September 1, 2004 10:48:08 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.09.01.15.14.10.261545@yahoo.com...

> The $10 power strips will do everything the $200 ones will do (which
> is handle a small spike not a direct lightning strike). The power strips
> justify themselves because they provide you with the outlets you need, and
> the switch is nice too. If the surge suppressor actually accomplishes
> anything then that's a bonus but don't count on it actually protecting
> your equipment. The more expensive power strips, the $25 ones, are just
> selling overpriced insurance policies. You already have homeowners
> insurance so you don't need that. A $200 power strip is an out and out
> scam, you might as well send your money to Nigeria.

including power strip/surge protectors used in mid-high end home theater
systems?
i have a $200 19" rackmount panamax, but is it any better than a $20 power
strip?
i dunno, other than the 12v remote signalling that allows me to power on the
amps
when i turn on the pre/pro lexicon.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 2, 2004 3:17:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Jim Gilliland <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in
news:uqOdnWho08jEKKjcRVn-ug@adelphia.com:

> Dave Oldridge wrote:
>> Jim Gilliland <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in
>> news:vNmdnYa25oYPW6ncRVn-rQ@adelphia.com:
>>
>>>Joan and Al wrote:
>>>
>>>>Hi: Just purchased a Samsung 50 inch HDTV/DLP from Best Buys. They
>>>>sold all kinds of goodies. Heavy duty cables for the Digital cable
>>>>box and DVD, $200 surge supressor. Are all these extras a scam.
>>>>Cable company said they were not necessary. Please help with your
>>>>opinions. Thanks, Joan
>>>
>>>You need decent cables, but at Best Buy you probably spent several
>>>times what you actually needed to. You certainly don't need anything
>>>with a major brand name on it (like Monster, for example). Walmart
>>>has some decent cables on their shelves at reasonable prices. You
>>>can do even better by shopping on the web. I can't see any reason
>>>for a surge suppressor. My Samsung is plugged directly into the
>>>wall.
>>
>> Surge suppressors and UPS's with built-in surge suppression have
>> saved my bacon more than once. Mind you, I've been living, up until
>> last year, in a fairly suburban area that is subject to ice storms
>> and thunderstorms.
>
> How do you know that? I live in Cleveland's suburbs, which sounds a

From other electronic equipment that was online at the time. Nothing is
going to protect you from a direct lightning hit, but there are induced
surges all the time and when ice-laden trees start colliding with wires
some pretty hairy things happen, too.

> lot like the area that you describe. I have quite a few power strips
> with surge suppressors in them, but I see no evidence that they've
> ever saved me from anything. The MOVs that they use to absorb surges
> aren't going to protect you from a direct lightning strike.

MOVs aren't really the best way to go. The BEST way is full isolation
via a very tough-built no-break system.

> Some of them "guarantee" that they will protect you from
> lightning-induced spikes, but charge a very high price for that
> "guarantee". What they're really selling you is insurance - they know
> how unlikely it is that lightning will damage your set, so by charging
> a high enough price for the "protection", they can afford to offer
> such coverage, paying for those few instances where damage actually
> occurs (and where the owner can properly document that all the terms
> of the "guarantee" have been met).

Yep.

> In any event, putting a $200 surge suppressor on a $4000 TV suggests
> that you think there is a better than 1 in 20 chance that your set
> will be damaged by lightning. I think your odds of being damaged are
> several orders of magnitude lower than that.

The best protection, in my experience is a good UPS that will run the
device for some minutes after the power gets hairy. A good one will drop
off the power line rather quickly and not put the device back on until
the power settles down. And few places are as bad as where I used to
live. In addition to having to deal with nature, we had some local low-
lifes who used to like to shoot out the high voltage feeder to the local
substation so they could get their cigarettes with a midnight raid on a
convenience store.

--
Dave Oldridge+
ICQ 1800667

A false witness is worse than no witness at all.
September 2, 2004 10:42:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> abe wrote:
> > I read the other post against surge protectors. I'm one of the
unfortunate
> > ones who found out the hard way. I used to keep my TV plugged into the
wall,
> > went on vacation and when I came back it was dead. Turns out either
> > lightening or spike messed it up and cost me a little over 300 bucks.
While
> > I agree the cables are overpriced I would advise from my own experience
to
> > get some kind of surge protector even if it's not the one that covers 7
> > bizillion bucks worth of damage. Personally speaking, it's like
> > insurance...you may never use it but if you need it, you'll be glad you
have
> > it.
>
> But you've just proved the point. You could have spent $200 on the Best
> Buy power protection that we're discussing here. Or you could have
> taken your chances on a $300 repair. Based upon those numbers (which
> may not be right in every case), you'd need to expect that one out of
> every two sets sold will suffer a lightning strike to make the purchase
> of a protector worthwhile. Clearly, the odds of being struck by
> lightning are far lower than that, so it's generally worth it to take
> the risk. You were one of the unlucky ones, but most owners will never
> have to make that repair.
>
> Now, if you could get adequate surge protection for somewhere in the
> range of $2-$20, then I'd say it might be money well spent. But $200?
> No way.

I agree, spending 200 on one is a bit much. I was just sharing the lesson I
learned, which is to get a surge protector. Doesn't matter if it's the $200
one or the $20 one, but get something. I bought a $50 one after the repair.
It seems to do all the most important things that the $200 one did, which is
mainly to keep spikes, surges, lightening, etc from frying my electronics.
Plus, it supposedly has a 250K insurance guarentee.

One other note about my repair. The TV that got hit was worth about $700.
Many of the TV's discussed here cost 2K and up. I mention this is because
the $300 repair on my old $700 TV could be $500 or more on a plasma or dlp,
for the exact same repair.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 2, 2004 11:18:46 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

abe wrote:

> One other note about my repair. The TV that got hit was worth about $700.
> Many of the TV's discussed here cost 2K and up. I mention this is because
> the $300 repair on my old $700 TV could be $500 or more on a plasma or dlp,
> for the exact same repair.

Possibly, but probably not. The power supply (which is the likely point
of damage) won't be much different on an HD set than on an older set.
In my Samsung DLP, every component inside sells for around $200 except
the light engine itself which is closer to $1200. But obviously, with a
more expensive set, you do have a higher overall risk.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 2, 2004 11:37:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
news:hdidnSqsaMYEnKrcRVn-jw@adelphia.com...
> abe wrote:
>
> > One other note about my repair. The TV that got hit was worth about
$700.
> > Many of the TV's discussed here cost 2K and up. I mention this is
because
> > the $300 repair on my old $700 TV could be $500 or more on a plasma or
dlp,
> > for the exact same repair.
>
> Possibly, but probably not. The power supply (which is the likely point
> of damage) won't be much different on an HD set than on an older set.
> In my Samsung DLP, every component inside sells for around $200 except
> the light engine itself which is closer to $1200. But obviously, with a
> more expensive set, you do have a higher overall risk.

The difference is that virtually no servicers are servicing even the power
supplies for these sets at the component level. With all repairs at the
board level, the minimum repair cost goes up considerably. When you start
at $200 for parts instead of $30, you get into the ballpark that he
described.

Leonard
September 2, 2004 8:54:49 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <R28Zc.37399$bT1.31266@fed1read07>,
"Leonard Caillouet" <no@no.com> wrote:

> I can see a reason for surge suppressors in my shop right now. I can hardly
> move. Our business doubles or triples in the shop when the thunderstorms
> hit.

I bought a Monster Cable surge suppressor. Generally not a believer in
their overpriced cables.

But paid a little extra because their surge suppressor comes with a
guarantee if their product fails to protect my equipment.

Of course, not many thunderstorms in my area but a power outage a couple
of years ago did kill a VCR.
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 3, 2004 12:23:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Leonard Caillouet wrote:
> "Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
> news:hdidnSqsaMYEnKrcRVn-jw@adelphia.com...
>>
>>Possibly, but probably not. The power supply (which is the likely point
>>of damage) won't be much different on an HD set than on an older set.
>>In my Samsung DLP, every component inside sells for around $200 except
>>the light engine itself which is closer to $1200. But obviously, with a
>>more expensive set, you do have a higher overall risk.
>
> The difference is that virtually no servicers are servicing even the power
> supplies for these sets at the component level. With all repairs at the
> board level, the minimum repair cost goes up considerably. When you start
> at $200 for parts instead of $30, you get into the ballpark that he
> described.

Then you might consider doing it yourself, if it proved necessary. It's
not much different from replacing a power supply in a typical PC. For
that matter, the same goes for most of the boards.
September 3, 2004 5:11:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 20:23:23 -0400, Jim Gilliland
<usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:

>Leonard Caillouet wrote:
>> "Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
>> news:hdidnSqsaMYEnKrcRVn-jw@adelphia.com...
>>>
>>>Possibly, but probably not. The power supply (which is the likely point
>>>of damage) won't be much different on an HD set than on an older set.
>>>In my Samsung DLP, every component inside sells for around $200 except
>>>the light engine itself which is closer to $1200. But obviously, with a
>>>more expensive set, you do have a higher overall risk.
>>
>> The difference is that virtually no servicers are servicing even the power
>> supplies for these sets at the component level. With all repairs at the
>> board level, the minimum repair cost goes up considerably. When you start
>> at $200 for parts instead of $30, you get into the ballpark that he
>> described.
>
>Then you might consider doing it yourself, if it proved necessary. It's
>not much different from replacing a power supply in a typical PC. For
>that matter, the same goes for most of the boards.

Except that PC parts are cheap and readily available, of course...
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 3, 2004 10:43:02 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"dizzy" <dizzy@nospam.invalid> wrote in message
news:sdhfj0dg09it2ksdlh7mh5q4ko0sv0qhi6@4ax.com...
> On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 20:23:23 -0400, Jim Gilliland
> <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote:
>
> >Leonard Caillouet wrote:
> >> "Jim Gilliland" <usemylastname@cheerful.com> wrote in message
> >> news:hdidnSqsaMYEnKrcRVn-jw@adelphia.com...
> >>>
> >>>Possibly, but probably not. The power supply (which is the likely
point
> >>>of damage) won't be much different on an HD set than on an older set.
> >>>In my Samsung DLP, every component inside sells for around $200 except
> >>>the light engine itself which is closer to $1200. But obviously, with
a
> >>>more expensive set, you do have a higher overall risk.
> >>
> >> The difference is that virtually no servicers are servicing even the
power
> >> supplies for these sets at the component level. With all repairs at
the
> >> board level, the minimum repair cost goes up considerably. When you
start
> >> at $200 for parts instead of $30, you get into the ballpark that he
> >> described.
> >
> >Then you might consider doing it yourself, if it proved necessary. It's
> >not much different from replacing a power supply in a typical PC. For
> >that matter, the same goes for most of the boards.
>
> Except that PC parts are cheap and readily available, of course...

What people don't realize is that even identifying the board which is the
source of the problem can require some troubleshooting skill and training on
anyh given product. I have seen many board-swappers get it wrong and end up
spending hundreds of dolars more than they should or even damaging other
parts. I get projectors where the consumer changed the lamp when it
wouldn't work but had nothing wrong but a bad switch or fan. Buying a lamp
is not such a big deal because it will be used eventually, but buying a
board that is not needed is a waste.

I am also curious to know what the real prices (to the consumer) for the
Samsung DLP boards are. To date I have seen no actual prices and part
numbers posted, just ballpark numbers.

Leonard
!