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Cloning a drive to upgrade a hard disc

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Anonymous
December 25, 2004 1:29:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

I am having no luck getting anyone to tell me how to upgrade a hard drive on
a Portege from 12 gig to 30

Can I install the empty 30 gig drive into the portege, use the recovery disc
to install the OS, connect it to the Internet update the OS. Then put that
drive in another computer, put the 12 gig back into the Portege and copy all
files to the other computer?

Presumably all OS files which arent copyable because they are in use will
not be copied but all software, dat files, dll files WILL be copied and the
udated versions of all files will be on the 30 gig drive in any event? Is
this too easy or will I find that this doesnt work because the 12 gig
drive's registry wont end up on the 30 gig drive? Is there a way around this
given that I do emphatically NOT want to merely reinstall all the software
and do three years worth of forgotten configuration changes all over again
on the new drive?

Symantec says that there is no way of using Ghost unless I have enough empty
space on the computer to write a .gho file and then copy it somehow directly
or indirectly onto the new drive: which I cant because the whole reason I am
doing this exercise is because the old 12 gig drive is full. (or should I
copy lots of software, my documents and picture-file directories onto a DVD
until there is enouigh space on the and then Ghost the rest onto the drive
prior to copying it to another DVD, then try to restore most of the OS from
that gho file onto the 30 gig drive?

More about : cloning drive upgrade hard disc

Anonymous
December 26, 2004 11:21:38 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

"Licensed to Quill" <fountainpen@amexol.net> wrote in message
news:%23HR%23Aap6EHA.1524@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> I am having no luck getting anyone to tell me how to upgrade a hard drive
on
> a Portege from 12 gig to 30
>
> Can I install the empty 30 gig drive into the portege, use the recovery
disc
> to install the OS, connect it to the Internet update the OS. Then put that
> drive in another computer, put the 12 gig back into the Portege and copy
all
> files to the other computer?
>
> Presumably all OS files which arent copyable because they are in use will
> not be copied but all software, dat files, dll files WILL be copied and
the
> udated versions of all files will be on the 30 gig drive in any event? Is
> this too easy or will I find that this doesnt work because the 12 gig
> drive's registry wont end up on the 30 gig drive? Is there a way around
this
> given that I do emphatically NOT want to merely reinstall all the software
> and do three years worth of forgotten configuration changes all over again
> on the new drive?
>
> Symantec says that there is no way of using Ghost unless I have enough
empty
> space on the computer to write a .gho file and then copy it somehow
directly
> or indirectly onto the new drive: which I cant because the whole reason I
am
> doing this exercise is because the old 12 gig drive is full. (or should I
> copy lots of software, my documents and picture-file directories onto a
DVD
> until there is enouigh space on the and then Ghost the rest onto the drive
> prior to copying it to another DVD, then try to restore most of the OS
from
> that gho file onto the 30 gig drive?
>
>

There are several ways to do this. Here are two of them:

a) Using an imaging tool:
- Split your hard disk with a partitioning program (e.g. Acronis).
- Create an image file of your system partition. Store it on drive D:.
- Save the image file on some networked PC.
- Install the new disk.
- Split it.
- Use the recovery CD to load the OS.
- Copy the image from the networked PC to drive D:.
- Restore the image with your partitioning program.

b) Using a desktop PC:
- Buy a $10.00 adapter that lets you connect your laptop
disk to a desktop PC.
- Connect the laptop disk to a desktop PC as a slave disk.
Ideally, the desktop PC should run Win2000/XP.
- Use xcopy.exe with the appropriate switches to copy
the old laptop disk to the desktop disk.
- Use xcopy.exe with the appropriate switches to load
the new laptop disk.
- Install the new disk in the laptop.
- Boot the laptop with your Win2000 CD into the Recovery Console
and use the fixmbr and fixboot commands to make Win2000
bootable.
Anonymous
December 26, 2004 1:38:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

Hi Pegasus

Are there any other ways of doing this? I said that I couldnt do the first
because the drive on the first disc is full and I did try the second with
curious results which I am not keen to replicate and which no one could
explain

I put the two drives in a 733MHz Pentium 111 desktop computer (not some old
steamer with LBA problems) and booted off a DOS diskette (I also tried to
get the system to see both discs by booting off a Partition Commander floppy
and copy an entire drive that way)

The desktop saw the 12 gig drive without a problem but wouldn't see the 30
gig one at all, whatever I did in the BIOS. In fact it couldnt even identify
the drive manufacturer. I then found that putting the laptop drive into the
desktop had destroyed the 30 gig drive. I then had to replace it and it did
the same thing again with the new drive.

Neither drive was ever seen or even identified by any computer after
insertion in the desktop. (I still have the adapters which didnt cost much)
I am not keen on trying that expensive (if quick) course again. No one has
the slightest idea what could possibly have happened beyond weakly
suggesting that I might have put the laptop drives in upside down which I
didnt.

Which is why I was asking the question here
Related resources
Anonymous
December 26, 2004 4:05:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

You can make 12 GB image using desktop, then restore the image onto 30 GB
laptop disk using Ghost over TCP/IP network. The same is true for Acronis
and other products.
Anonymous
December 26, 2004 11:17:11 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

> You can make 12 GB image using desktop, then restore the image onto 30 GB
laptop disk using Ghost over TCP/IP network. The same is true for Acronis
and other products.

I think this opens up a whole can of worms: I have never managed to network
my computers together however much I call the network by the same name,
allow file sharing wherever it is needed, allow permissions, let myself do
whatever I want behind my own firewall. Nothing ever gets seen by the other
computers on the network (OR is seen on the 12 gig computer) and they ALL
use the same wifi sharing connection

I would LOVE to image the whole drive to a desktop somewhere but with 11.5
gig of a 12 gig drive used up, I have painted myself into a corner on that
one (unless someone has some suggestions I hadn't thought of: I was trying
to copy innocuous directories to a DVD-R disc and delete them and image the
rest using Ghost etc but posted here because I was wondering if there was
likely to be an easier way; as I am using the same computer and in THEORY
should be able to use the registry on the old drive on the new drive
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 1:48:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

Next option is to borrow the USB enclosure.
Anonymous
December 27, 2004 2:03:52 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

"Licensed to Quill" <fountainpen@amexol.net> wrote in message
news:ei7Nfl26EHA.3828@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hi Pegasus
>
> Are there any other ways of doing this? I said that I couldnt do the first
> because the drive on the first disc is full and I did try the second with
> curious results which I am not keen to replicate and which no one could
> explain
>
> I put the two drives in a 733MHz Pentium 111 desktop computer (not some
old
> steamer with LBA problems) and booted off a DOS diskette (I also tried to
> get the system to see both discs by booting off a Partition Commander
floppy
> and copy an entire drive that way)
>
> The desktop saw the 12 gig drive without a problem but wouldn't see the 30
> gig one at all, whatever I did in the BIOS. In fact it couldnt even
identify
> the drive manufacturer. I then found that putting the laptop drive into
the
> desktop had destroyed the 30 gig drive. I then had to replace it and it
did
> the same thing again with the new drive.
>
> Neither drive was ever seen or even identified by any computer after
> insertion in the desktop. (I still have the adapters which didnt cost
much)
> I am not keen on trying that expensive (if quick) course again. No one has
> the slightest idea what could possibly have happened beyond weakly
> suggesting that I might have put the laptop drives in upside down which I
> didnt.
>
> Which is why I was asking the question here
>

It is very easy to destroy a laptop disk when using the adapter
I mentioned, by plugging in the cable back to front. This has the
effect of applying the power supply wires to the wrong pins, with
disastrous results.

There are indeed other ways to clone a laptop disk to a new
disk. The are safer but more laborious or more expensive.
Here are a few more:

a) Ask your friendly computer dealer to do it for you (if you
can trust him!).
b) Boot the machine with a Acronis recovery CD, then create
an image on a networked PC.
c) Boot the laptop with a Bart PE CD (www.bootdisk.com),
then establish a network connection to some other PC
and zip up drive C: to that other PC. To make a Bart PE
CD, you need a CD burner and a load of a WinXP Professional
CD (but no licence number!).
d) Boot the laptop with a network boot disk (www.bootdisk.com),
then use DriveImage or a similar product to create an image on
a networked PC.

Methods b) to d) all have their traps - they may or may not work
with your laptop, depending on the network adapter you use.
They also involve a fair amount of work. This is why it is important
to manage disk space carefully so that never paint yourself into
a corner.
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 4:35:40 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

Unfortunately against every one's advice I installed Roxio Easy CD Creator
5: That never worked and now that I have installed it, none of my USB or
SCSI storage drives work: I cant even use Sony Easy CD Creator to write to a
CD any more

Is there a third party uninstall program anywhere I can use to repair the
damage done to a 2000 system by Easy CD Creator? Or is there a thread
anywhere which recommends what to do once this catastrophic piece of
software has trojaned itself onto a Windows 2000 system?

"Jetro" <somewhere@internet.space> wrote in message
news:%23a9oRtC7EHA.3944@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Next option is to borrow the USB enclosure.
>
>
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 6:00:33 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

Maybe these can help:

http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;270008
http://www.roxio.com/en/support/kb/ecddvdc/ee6000061.jh...

RegSeeker might prove helpful in removing Roxio registry keys:
http://www.hoverdesk.net/freeware.htm
Use with caution, it's quite powerful!

John

Licensed to Quill wrote:
> Unfortunately against every one's advice I installed Roxio Easy CD Creator
> 5: That never worked and now that I have installed it, none of my USB or
> SCSI storage drives work: I cant even use Sony Easy CD Creator to write to a
> CD any more
>
> Is there a third party uninstall program anywhere I can use to repair the
> damage done to a 2000 system by Easy CD Creator? Or is there a thread
> anywhere which recommends what to do once this catastrophic piece of
> software has trojaned itself onto a Windows 2000 system?
>
> "Jetro" <somewhere@internet.space> wrote in message
> news:%23a9oRtC7EHA.3944@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
>
>>Next option is to borrow the USB enclosure.
>>
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 7:09:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

Uhm, are you sure you still want to clone this installation? :o )
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 7:26:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

> Uhm, are you sure you still want to clone this installation? :o )

I still think it would be a nightmare trying to redo three years worth of
software corrections, configurations, registry changes, software
registration number entries, usage keys required by software companies which
no longer exist, WINFAX records where their backup program has failed years
ago (and I have to rely on hope alone that I can rebuild their logs with no
backup) etc etc etc.

I might have to do this eventually when I start realising that I no longer
want to continue to use a three year old computer. And I suppose the
arguments against are that the 3yrold can be retained for the use of these
pieces of software alone but I wanted to cross that bridge when I come to
it. (not that I am not already there with using a 650 MHx Portege when I
also have a 1.4GHz Satellite here)

I thought I could buy some more time with instaling a network and sharing
files but despite a literally hugenumber of tries, I just cant get my
network to share files between computers which all have file sharing turned
on everywhere in sight, all have the same workgroup name and which share the
same WiFi connection to the Internet
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 8:52:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

Software hive and others as well as Winfax Data directory are plainly
transferable.

You can start new thread in ..win2000.networking group.
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 9:42:39 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

"Jetro" <somewhere@internet.space> wrote in message
news:o iguOjf7EHA.824@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> Software hive

Yes, but I have software with special security settings which mandate going
to the manufacturer's site and downloading a special key every time I need
to (re-)install the software. The manufacturer was transmuted into another
company a year or so ago in some acrimonious litigation. So I doubt if the
new owner of the company will honour all the old licenses. AND the old
importer of the software who sold it to me originally no longer distributes
it. (It is all a bit stupid as the software can only be used with a special
piece of hardware which isn't otherwise available. It's not as if every one
would be able to copy it and use it in any way)
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 1:47:31 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

Well the Zap Roxio file did something even though it says it only works with
Easy CD Creator 6 and I am using 5. But when I did try to run it, they
managed to fool me because immediately it asked me if I am trying to delete
a version 4 or 5!!!

Anyway, after I ran it, neither the USB drives nor the Iomega SCSI drives
which did work before no longer work. This is becoming catastrophic?

I did do a backup of the registry before installing Easy CD Creator just in
case (I am not THAT stupid)

I now have a 58 megabyte file in my My Documents folder called 25th
December 2004 Registry.reg and wonder how I can replace the registry with
the info in this working file? There isn't a scanreg /restore in Windows
2000 is there?

I tried doubleclicking on it and was asked if I wanted to ADD the data in it
to the current registry which I am not entirley sure i do want to do, but i
did and was after about 20 seconds told that I cant add all this info to the
registry.

Anyone know how to replace the obviously corrupted info in the present
registry with the backup in this file?
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 12:21:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

How did you back up the registry? Anyhow, see if this can help:
How to back up, edit, and restore the registry in Windows 2000
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb%3BEN-...

If you just exported the whole registry you most likely won't be able to
just restore the whole whack just like that, the registry should have
been backed up with the Backup utility. You might have to parse the
registry file you created then try to restore selected hives or keys.
The key that would be of concern is the hardware & Enum keys or this
branch: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM. Maybe you can try restoring the
whole HKLM hive so that you get rid of Roxio program entries at the same
time. If you can't restore the whole hive then try parsing it. MAKE a
working copy for parsing!

Did you try: Disabling the problem devices, reboot to make sure the
drivers are unloaded then delete (uninstall) the problem devices and
reboot again and having Plug and Play reinstall the devices but with you
pointing it to the proper drivers instead of Windows choosing the
drivers? Or, if Plug & Pray installs Roxio drivers without asking try
using the Add Hardware Wizard to install and point windows to the proper
drivers?

John


Licensed to Quill wrote:

> Well the Zap Roxio file did something even though it says it only works with
> Easy CD Creator 6 and I am using 5. But when I did try to run it, they
> managed to fool me because immediately it asked me if I am trying to delete
> a version 4 or 5!!!
>
> Anyway, after I ran it, neither the USB drives nor the Iomega SCSI drives
> which did work before no longer work. This is becoming catastrophic?
>
> I did do a backup of the registry before installing Easy CD Creator just in
> case (I am not THAT stupid)
>
> I now have a 58 megabyte file in my My Documents folder called 25th
> December 2004 Registry.reg and wonder how I can replace the registry with
> the info in this working file? There isn't a scanreg /restore in Windows
> 2000 is there?
>
> I tried doubleclicking on it and was asked if I wanted to ADD the data in it
> to the current registry which I am not entirley sure i do want to do, but i
> did and was after about 20 seconds told that I cant add all this info to the
> registry.
>
> Anyone know how to replace the obviously corrupted info in the present
> registry with the backup in this file?
>
>
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 1:09:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

PS: Do you have a repair folder and what is the date on the file
system._ ? If it's not too old or if you are confident that no
significant hardware changes were made after the date you might be best
restoring that instead of trying to parse that huge .reg file you made,
let us know.

John

John John wrote:

> How did you back up the registry? Anyhow, see if this can help:
> How to back up, edit, and restore the registry in Windows 2000
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb%3BEN-...
>
> If you just exported the whole registry you most likely won't be able to
> just restore the whole whack just like that, the registry should have
> been backed up with the Backup utility. You might have to parse the
> registry file you created then try to restore selected hives or keys.
> The key that would be of concern is the hardware & Enum keys or this
> branch: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM. Maybe you can try restoring the
> whole HKLM hive so that you get rid of Roxio program entries at the same
> time. If you can't restore the whole hive then try parsing it. MAKE a
> working copy for parsing!
>
> Did you try: Disabling the problem devices, reboot to make sure the
> drivers are unloaded then delete (uninstall) the problem devices and
> reboot again and having Plug and Play reinstall the devices but with you
> pointing it to the proper drivers instead of Windows choosing the
> drivers? Or, if Plug & Pray installs Roxio drivers without asking try
> using the Add Hardware Wizard to install and point windows to the proper
> drivers?
>
> John
>
>
> Licensed to Quill wrote:
>
>> Well the Zap Roxio file did something even though it says it only
>> works with
>> Easy CD Creator 6 and I am using 5. But when I did try to run it, they
>> managed to fool me because immediately it asked me if I am trying to
>> delete
>> a version 4 or 5!!!
>>
>> Anyway, after I ran it, neither the USB drives nor the Iomega SCSI drives
>> which did work before no longer work. This is becoming catastrophic?
>>
>> I did do a backup of the registry before installing Easy CD Creator
>> just in
>> case (I am not THAT stupid)
>>
>> I now have a 58 megabyte file in my My Documents folder called 25th
>> December 2004 Registry.reg and wonder how I can replace the registry with
>> the info in this working file? There isn't a scanreg /restore in Windows
>> 2000 is there?
>>
>> I tried doubleclicking on it and was asked if I wanted to ADD the data
>> in it
>> to the current registry which I am not entirley sure i do want to do,
>> but i
>> did and was after about 20 seconds told that I cant add all this info
>> to the
>> registry.
>>
>> Anyone know how to replace the obviously corrupted info in the present
>> registry with the backup in this file?
>>
>>
>
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 1:09:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

John John wrote:
> PS: Do you have a repair folder and what is the date on the file
> system._ ? If it's not too old or if you are confident that no
> significant hardware changes were made after the date you might be
> best restoring that instead of trying to parse that huge .reg file
> you made, let us know.
>
> John
Your idea about disabling the offending entries was a good one except that
when I rebooted the second time (after the uninstall), I received the error
message that it couldn't install the device: It said "YOUR SERVICE DATABASE
IS LOCKED" when it found the SCSI device. It then carried on and found the
device again about twenty seconds later and said it was installing it and
told me to reboot. But needless to say, that didn't assist the problem at
all. Funny, though, when it is sniffing around to see what is there on
startup before I even go into windows, the sniffing process doesnt even see
the devices (Zip, Jaz and Coolscan on that chain) which usually blink a few
times to show they are being detected.

You are right about your implications: I am petrified about the prospect of
parsing a whole registry or a whole section of the registry!! (even if I
knew what it meant)
I do have a repair folder along with a somewhat suspicious REGBACK folder
with all sorts of up to 20 megabyte .dat files in it dated 27th December
(which is unfortunately a few days AFTER the Roxio install). But maybe that
is an access date? Interestingly the system file shows in PROPERTIES to
have been created in 2003 and modified in June 2004 so if I can use them,
they might not be too disastrous?

But the Repair folder itself has files in it which date back to June 2000
which is before I even got the computer so they might not be all that much
use if they cause all my software to stop working and all my working
hardware to need re-installing? When you said REPAIR folder in your
message, might it possibly be called REGBACK?
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 2:52:42 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

Do you still have any Roxio or Adaptec services starting automatically?
Do Crtl-Alt-Delete and look at the running processes, what's in there?
Look in your Services Manager and see what services are running and
which are set to Automatic Start. Before doing a registry restore we
should make sure that none of the useless Roxio services are still starting.

John

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> John John wrote:
>
>>PS: Do you have a repair folder and what is the date on the file
>>system._ ? If it's not too old or if you are confident that no
>>significant hardware changes were made after the date you might be
>>best restoring that instead of trying to parse that huge .reg file
>>you made, let us know.
>>
>>John
>
> Your idea about disabling the offending entries was a good one except that
> when I rebooted the second time (after the uninstall), I received the error
> message that it couldn't install the device: It said "YOUR SERVICE DATABASE
> IS LOCKED" when it found the SCSI device. It then carried on and found the
> device again about twenty seconds later and said it was installing it and
> told me to reboot. But needless to say, that didn't assist the problem at
> all. Funny, though, when it is sniffing around to see what is there on
> startup before I even go into windows, the sniffing process doesnt even see
> the devices (Zip, Jaz and Coolscan on that chain) which usually blink a few
> times to show they are being detected.
>
> You are right about your implications: I am petrified about the prospect of
> parsing a whole registry or a whole section of the registry!! (even if I
> knew what it meant)
> I do have a repair folder along with a somewhat suspicious REGBACK folder
> with all sorts of up to 20 megabyte .dat files in it dated 27th December
> (which is unfortunately a few days AFTER the Roxio install). But maybe that
> is an access date? Interestingly the system file shows in PROPERTIES to
> have been created in 2003 and modified in June 2004 so if I can use them,
> they might not be too disastrous?
>
> But the Repair folder itself has files in it which date back to June 2000
> which is before I even got the computer so they might not be all that much
> use if they cause all my software to stop working and all my working
> hardware to need re-installing? When you said REPAIR folder in your
> message, might it possibly be called REGBACK?
>
>
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 2:52:43 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

John John wrote:
> Do you still have any Roxio or Adaptec services starting
> automatically? Do Crtl-Alt-Delete and look at the running
> processes, what's in there? Look in your Services Manager and see
> what services are running and
> which are set to Automatic Start.

Going into processes running, none seem to be Roxio or Roxio related.
Certainly after uninstalling and then doing a Roxizap, nothing is loading
automatically
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 5:13:53 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> Certainly after uninstalling and then doing a Roxizap, nothing is loading
> automatically

You never know with Roxio! Back to the registry backup and restore.
The backup files would be in C:\WINNT\repair and
C:\WINNT\repair\RegBack. (Assuming of course that your system drive is
C and that the %systemroot% folder is winnt). These are the files that
would be used to restore the registry system hive. You stated that the
files in the Regback folder were last modified in June 2004, these are
the files that you will restore, that will have to do and should do
providing that no major hardware modifications were made after that
date. You will concern yourself with only one file or hive, the System
hive. The software hive is quite frankly a bit old to be restored,
restoring the software hive would probably cause other software
problems. Follow these instructions:

1. Use the Windows 2000 CD-ROM or the Windows 2000 Startup disk to
start the computer.
2. When you see the "Welcome to Setup" message, press R for "repair."
3. Press C to run the Recovery Console tool.
4. Select the installation that you want to repair.
5. Type the administrator password.
6. At the Recovery Console command prompt, type the following commands,
pressing ENTER after you type each command:

cd system32\config
ren system system.old
ren system.alt systemalt.old

7. Copy the backup of the System hive from the
%SystemRoot%\Repair\Regback folder.

IMPORTANT: You need to restore the most recent copy of the System hive.
You also need to reinstall any hardware device drivers or programs that
run as services that you installed since the last time that you updated
your Emergency Repair Disk. (You stated earlier that the System file in
the Regback folder was the newest, June 2004, copy from that folder!)

To copy the System hive that was backed up the last time that you ran
the Emergency Repair Disk Wizard, type the following command, and then
press ENTER:

copy c:\winnt\repair\regback\system c:\winnt\system32\config

8. At the command prompt, type exit, and then press ENTER to restart
your computer.

That will restore the system to the June 2004 configuration. This
information is culled from
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;269075. You
should understand that this is usually a last ditch attempt before a
Windows reinstall, meaning that all other attempts to uninstall and
repair the devices fail.

On a final note, I am a bit concerned at the size of your registry
(58MB) and at the size of the registry backup files some being 20+MB.
These figures seem high to me, I have all kinds of devices and software
on my W2k machines and none have such a large registry or registry
backup files. IF the System file in C:\WINNT\repair\RegBack is GREATER
than 16MB this WILL cause problems, check that BEFORE attempting to
restore it. Good luck, if this doesn't work you are facing a reinstall
of some sort.

John
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 5:13:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

Here is a problem I have always regarded as catastrohic but which in this
case there may be a way around: I dont have a system disc: I only have one
of those lousy recovery discs. But I DO have a CD with a complete i386
directory. Can I use this for the restore you mention?
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 6:15:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

You should be able to launch the Recovery Console with that "lousy
recovery disk", did you try it? What does it say when you try? As for
the other cd I don't know, what else is on there? Is it a bootable cd
of sorts? Maybe it's just a Service Pack CD to accompany the Recovery
Disk, not much help for what you need. Surely any pc vendor worth 2
cents would have sent a bootable recovery disk with recovery console
ustility included. If not they need to be tared and feathered!

John

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> Here is a problem I have always regarded as catastrohic but which in this
> case there may be a way around: I dont have a system disc: I only have one
> of those lousy recovery discs. But I DO have a CD with a complete i386
> directory. Can I use this for the restore you mention?
>
>
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 6:15:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

Yes, I agree with you about "any vendor worth 2 cents would have sent a
bootable recovery disk with recovery console ustility included. If not they
need to be tared and feathered! "

And as a member of an association of journalists, I have often advised
journalists on their private forum never to buy a computer with a recovery
disc principally since I discovered what it was and how dangerous it could
be to use.

I was proposing to boot off some (windows 98?) disc I can find on
bootdisc.com and then use the CD which contains a complete Windows 2000 i386
directory off which (in theory) windows 2000 can be installed. I made it to
run SFC and wonder if it can operate the recovery console?

I also have a newer xp pro install disc which contains a newer i386
directory but I somehow doubt that I could use that?

The actual last resort might be to upgrade the Windows 2000 installation to
XP and see if it rectifies the problems inserted by Roxio or if they are
completely bullet proof as suggested by it somehow stopping the sniffing
process? I have been trying so hard for the last few years not to go over to
the intensely annoying xp but might have to do so now if all else fails
rather than reinstall 2000 from the recovery disc?
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 8:08:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> And as a member of an association of journalists, I have often advised
> journalists on their private forum never to buy a computer with a recovery
> disc principally since I discovered what it was and how dangerous it could
> be to use.

In the earlier Windows days ie w95, NT4, & W98 new pcs used to ship with
Windows CDs or diskettes. In order to curb piracy Microsoft changed the
distribution method for OEM. Now mostly all pcs ship with restore
disks, but that doesn't mean that the restore cds need to be completely
crippled and inadequate, the only real difference with these restore cds
is that because of BIOS recognition they can't be used to install
Windows on other computers. It's up to the manufacturer to send decent
restore disks with the computer, I know from experience that Dell for
example has always shipped fully functional restore disks with their
pcs. Of course with XP Product Activation the distribution method may
be changing.

> I was proposing to boot off some (windows 98?) disc I can find on
> bootdisc.com and then use the CD which contains a complete Windows 2000 i386
> directory off which (in theory) windows 2000 can be installed. I made it to
> run SFC and wonder if it can operate the recovery console?

No need to do that, plus, if the file system is NTFS the w98 DOS boot
disk won't even know that there is a hard drive or accessible partition
present.
>
> I also have a newer xp pro install disc which contains a newer i386
> directory but I somehow doubt that I could use that?

Probably yes, but I'm 100% not sure, you won't be installing anything
just using the Recovery Console tool to manipulate files. I doubt that
the XP Recovery Console is that much different than the W2k one and
can't see why you couldn't use it to move around your W2k installation.
For that matter you can probably use an NT4 one. Some commands are
missing from one to the other but most everything works (I think).
>
> The actual last resort might be to upgrade the Windows 2000 installation to
> XP and see if it rectifies the problems inserted by Roxio or if they are
> completely bullet proof as suggested by it somehow stopping the sniffing
> process? I have been trying so hard for the last few years not to go over to
> the intensely annoying xp but might have to do so now if all else fails
> rather than reinstall 2000 from the recovery disc?

Very, very, very bad idea! Upgrading Operating systems (instead of
clean installs) is a bad idea for starters and upgrading an Operating
System to try to cure existing problems is an even worse idea! If
anything you would probably end up with MORE problems. It's a no-no in
all cases.

You can install the Windows 2000 recovery console on your hard drive
from the i386 folder and then have a boot option for the RC show when
you boot the pc. Once done you can remove the RC altogether or remove
the path to it only in the boot file.

CD-ROM drive letter:\i386\winnt32.exe /cmdcons That should work from
the Recovery CD or that other CD you have with i386 on it. You might
have to explore the Recovery CD to see where the RC might be hiding.

How To Install the Windows Recovery Console
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;216417

John
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 12:19:41 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

Well my recovery disc isnt usable except to boot into a total windows 2000
installation so I suppose I should try the XP recovery console: All it can
actually do worst case scenario is tell me I am trying to recover the wrong
OS

I am just wondering how big the recovery console is on these discs? I dont
have much space on my drive which is why I was doing a clone job initially.

Oh well, I suppose I will find out the answers to these questions simply by
putting the disc in my drive and running the F:\i386\winnt32.exe /cmdcons
command

> That should work from the Recovery CD or that other CD you have with i386
on it. You might
> have to explore the Recovery CD to see where the RC might be hiding.
>
> How To Install the Windows Recovery Console
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;216417
>
> John
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 1:37:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications (More info?)

It should work right off the XP cd without needing to install, I know
that the NT/W2k work across versions with some features extra or missing
depending on the OS. Let us know, I'm curious.

John

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> Well my recovery disc isnt usable except to boot into a total windows 2000
> installation so I suppose I should try the XP recovery console: All it can
> actually do worst case scenario is tell me I am trying to recover the wrong
> OS
>
> I am just wondering how big the recovery console is on these discs? I dont
> have much space on my drive which is why I was doing a clone job initially.
>
> Oh well, I suppose I will find out the answers to these questions simply by
> putting the disc in my drive and running the F:\i386\winnt32.exe /cmdcons
> command
>
>
>>That should work from the Recovery CD or that other CD you have with i386
>
> on it. You might
>
>>have to explore the Recovery CD to see where the RC might be hiding.
>>
>>How To Install the Windows Recovery Console
>>http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;216417
>>
>>John
>
>
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 5:45:59 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

It should work right off the XP cd without needing to install, I know
> that the NT/W2k work across versions with some features extra or missing
> depending on the OS. Let us know, I'm curious.

Well, following the Microsoft instructions completely screwed up my whole
system by corrupting my registry

To be precise, having instlled it, I did mange to get into the recovery
console and that recovery console did manage to somehow update the registry
with the one in the place mentioned in the instructions (the repair
directory) but the system wouldn't boot thereafter. It always just says that
there is aproblem with the SYSTEM file

Getting it to do a boot in verbose mode, it gets as far as the system file,
then moves ot the system.alt file and then stops immediately, citing some
problem with a supposedly corrupted SYSTEM file (I dont beleive it IS
actually corrupted, it is just a renamed version of a file which worked up
until I renamed it according to Microsoft instructions a few minutes before)
which I presume is the actual registry itself. (I am wondering if there is
a step they aren't telling you about which you have to take when exiting
out of the recovery console before you can use that file as a registry such
as changing its file attributes?)

I tried going back to the recovery console and renaming all the files which
ARE there (the one we were trying to cure was a 7.2 megabyte file) back to
their original names (renaming system.old to system and systemalt.old back
to system.alt) but I still get the same error message telling me that the
system file is corrupted. I then tried every combination of the (only two)
system files I have on my system and the OS wont let me use either of them
as a SYSTEM file. Naturally it won't let me use the last known good
installation on an F8 boot either.

>
> John
>
> Licensed to Quill wrote:
>
> > Well my recovery disc isnt usable except to boot into a total windows
2000
> > installation so I suppose I should try the XP recovery console: All it
can
> > actually do worst case scenario is tell me I am trying to recover the
wrong
> > OS
> >
> > I am just wondering how big the recovery console is on these discs? I
dont
> > have much space on my drive which is why I was doing a clone job
initially.
> >
> > Oh well, I suppose I will find out the answers to these questions simply
by
> > putting the disc in my drive and running the F:\i386\winnt32.exe
/cmdcons
> > command
> >
> >
> >>That should work from the Recovery CD or that other CD you have with
i386
> >
> > on it. You might
> >
> >>have to explore the Recovery CD to see where the RC might be hiding.
> >>
> >>How To Install the Windows Recovery Console
> >>http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;216417
> >>
> >>John
> >
> >
> >
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 7:27:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup (More info?)

Did you use the file in the repair directory or the one in the regback
folder? The one in the Regback folder was much newer. You had two sets
of backups, (C:\WINNT\repair and C:\WINNT\repair\RegBack) try one then
the other.

Time to use that recovery disc and do an inplace upgrade. You will need
these Iomega SCSI drivers on a diskette and tell Windows at the hardware
detection at begining of the installation that you have a "Mass Storage
Device" to install.

How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows 2000
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q292175

What an In-Place Win2K Upgrade Changes and What It Doesn't
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q306952

How to Move a Windows 2000 Installation to Different Hardware
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;EN-US;Q249694&ID=KB;EN-US;Q249694

John

Licensed to Quill wrote:
> It should work right off the XP cd without needing to install, I know
>
>>that the NT/W2k work across versions with some features extra or missing
>>depending on the OS. Let us know, I'm curious.
>
>
> Well, following the Microsoft instructions completely screwed up my whole
> system by corrupting my registry
>
> To be precise, having instlled it, I did mange to get into the recovery
> console and that recovery console did manage to somehow update the registry
> with the one in the place mentioned in the instructions (the repair
> directory) but the system wouldn't boot thereafter. It always just says that
> there is aproblem with the SYSTEM file
>
> Getting it to do a boot in verbose mode, it gets as far as the system file,
> then moves ot the system.alt file and then stops immediately, citing some
> problem with a supposedly corrupted SYSTEM file (I dont beleive it IS
> actually corrupted, it is just a renamed version of a file which worked up
> until I renamed it according to Microsoft instructions a few minutes before)
> which I presume is the actual registry itself. (I am wondering if there is
> a step they aren't telling you about which you have to take when exiting
> out of the recovery console before you can use that file as a registry such
> as changing its file attributes?)
>
> I tried going back to the recovery console and renaming all the files which
> ARE there (the one we were trying to cure was a 7.2 megabyte file) back to
> their original names (renaming system.old to system and systemalt.old back
> to system.alt) but I still get the same error message telling me that the
> system file is corrupted. I then tried every combination of the (only two)
> system files I have on my system and the OS wont let me use either of them
> as a SYSTEM file. Naturally it won't let me use the last known good
> installation on an F8 boot either.
>
>
>>John
>>
>>Licensed to Quill wrote:
>>
>>
>>>Well my recovery disc isnt usable except to boot into a total windows
>
> 2000
>
>>>installation so I suppose I should try the XP recovery console: All it
>
> can
>
>>>actually do worst case scenario is tell me I am trying to recover the
>
> wrong
>
>>>OS
>>>
>>>I am just wondering how big the recovery console is on these discs? I
>
> dont
>
>>>have much space on my drive which is why I was doing a clone job
>
> initially.
>
>>>Oh well, I suppose I will find out the answers to these questions simply
>
> by
>
>>>putting the disc in my drive and running the F:\i386\winnt32.exe
>
> /cmdcons
>
>>>command
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>That should work from the Recovery CD or that other CD you have with
>
> i386
>
>>>on it. You might
>>>
>>>
>>>>have to explore the Recovery CD to see where the RC might be hiding.
>>>>
>>>>How To Install the Windows Recovery Console
>>>>http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;216417
>>>>
>>>>John
>>>
>>>
>>>
>
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 7:33:27 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

I hope I have a few options yet before putting that recovery disc in and
erasing all my files: Beware of Toshiba recovery discs!! I suspect I would
prefer to go over to Linux and use this whole (only slightly elderly)
computer as a slave for the drive alone before doing that? I am beginning
to wonder how long one should retain these not brand-new computers after
yesterday when a friend told me he had just bought a new (admittedly
Toshiba) computer with a wide screen and Celeron processor for $499 after
two $200 rebates at CompUSA

I don't know which registry it prompted me to use, which ever one is used
when I followed those instructions??

There is something called a Windows 2000 registry repair tool which installs
off 6 floppies (which seem to have to be installed through XP???) which
might be worth a try, especially as I suspect I haven't actually got
anything wrong with my registry: The boot process which stops stops before
it actually does anything besides check that there is an .alt file there so
I suspect there isn't much actually wrong with the registry which it cant
see

> How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows 2000
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q292175
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 10:27:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

I see, one of those all or nothing recovery disc, like IBM F11 boxes,
they not only format the install partition but also fdisk the drive and
remove all the partitions! There might yet be hope, but the options are
growing faint... There were 2 possible backups to use, they would have
been copied with:

copy c:\winnt\repair\regback\system c:\winnt\system32\config

or

copy c:\winnt\repair\system c:\winnt\system32\config

(After you issue the copy command you should get a message stating that
1 file was copied).

This is an other install option:
How to perform a parallel installation of Windows 2000 or Windows Server
2003
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;266465

John

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> I hope I have a few options yet before putting that recovery disc in and
> erasing all my files: Beware of Toshiba recovery discs!! I suspect I would
> prefer to go over to Linux and use this whole (only slightly elderly)
> computer as a slave for the drive alone before doing that? I am beginning
> to wonder how long one should retain these not brand-new computers after
> yesterday when a friend told me he had just bought a new (admittedly
> Toshiba) computer with a wide screen and Celeron processor for $499 after
> two $200 rebates at CompUSA
>
> I don't know which registry it prompted me to use, which ever one is used
> when I followed those instructions??
>
> There is something called a Windows 2000 registry repair tool which installs
> off 6 floppies (which seem to have to be installed through XP???) which
> might be worth a try, especially as I suspect I haven't actually got
> anything wrong with my registry: The boot process which stops stops before
> it actually does anything besides check that there is an .alt file there so
> I suspect there isn't much actually wrong with the registry which it cant
> see
>
>
>>How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows 2000
>>http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q292175
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 11:14:10 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Is this what you referred to?
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyI...

Give it a try.

John

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> I hope I have a few options yet before putting that recovery disc in and
> erasing all my files: Beware of Toshiba recovery discs!! I suspect I would
> prefer to go over to Linux and use this whole (only slightly elderly)
> computer as a slave for the drive alone before doing that? I am beginning
> to wonder how long one should retain these not brand-new computers after
> yesterday when a friend told me he had just bought a new (admittedly
> Toshiba) computer with a wide screen and Celeron processor for $499 after
> two $200 rebates at CompUSA
>
> I don't know which registry it prompted me to use, which ever one is used
> when I followed those instructions??
>
> There is something called a Windows 2000 registry repair tool which installs
> off 6 floppies (which seem to have to be installed through XP???) which
> might be worth a try, especially as I suspect I haven't actually got
> anything wrong with my registry: The boot process which stops stops before
> it actually does anything besides check that there is an .alt file there so
> I suspect there isn't much actually wrong with the registry which it cant
> see
>
>
>>How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade of Windows 2000
>>http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q292175
>>
>
>
>
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 11:41:48 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

I suspected it was the process of using that recovery console which was
causing the file to become corrupted but I wasnt sure. It hadnt occured to
me that I was copying the wrong registry until you mentioned it so I will
try it before I try the six disc checkReg file

> copy c:\winnt\repair\regback\system c:\winnt\system32\config
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 2:08:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

> Give it a try.
Things are getting very peculiar indeed: Nothing will get this system to see
that there is a registry there. I have now confirmed that the registry is
exactly as it was before I made the changes, even gone as far as to repair
the registry to ensure that what wasn't broken before DEFINITELY isn't
broken now (the repair utility reports that the registry has been repaired)
and still the system wont boot to any registry

I also checked that the registry is one which was working before and that
the backup replacement I tried IS one which was working last June and it is
(the one in the other directory is one which dates from before I got the
computer when the original install was done and is only about two megabytes
as opposed to the recent one which is 7.2 Mb and the June one which is 6.6
Mb. So the problem isn't with the registry, it is with something preventing
the system from seeing it. Whatever I do, as I said, I can check by going
into safe mode boot and it shows verbose mode, goes straight past SYSTEM to
check for a SYSTEM.ALT file and then stops without reading anything from
either, telling me immediately that there is no registry.

Not that I have tried it yet but I am even beginning to doubt that I would
be able to do an in-place upgrade to XP Pro as the install process might not
see this registry.

Any ideas what might be wrong or is there something on the MS Knowledge
base about systems not being able to see their perfectly proper SYSTEM files
which might be relevant to this problem? ( I never managed ot figure out any
way of checking that source and posting to the win2000.registry group doesnt
seem to be eliciting any responses)
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 9:03:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Well, I guess I wasn't clear enough in an earlier post when I said
"...if this doesn't work you are facing a reinstall of some sort." I
should have worded that differently, I apologize, I should have said:
"...this might require a reinstall if things go wrong."

Do you have an Emergency Repair Disk?
To use emergency repair on a system that will not start
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/en/advanced/help/d...

What is exact error message that you get? Post it here.

What are the specs on the machine and about how much free space do you
have on the hard drive? What is that XP disc that you have? Did you
install it and activate it elsewhere? Hardware and space permitting you
can use it to salvage your files. What is the file system on the
machine FAT32 or NTFS? Do you have access to a REAL Windows 2000
install disc? That would be the best way out of this quagmire that I
and Roxio led you into. If the drive is FAT32, Windows 98 (or even DOS)
can be used to salvage your files. If your files are small DOS and an
NTFS DOS reader can be used to salvage them. The drive is slavable to
another W2K or XP machine but you will need an adaptor cable.

Until one of your last posts I was unaware that this was a laptop,
makes a BIG difference when trying to help, laptops are particularly
finicky and without a doubt my suggestion would have been to consult
Toshiba website for help. What is the model number of the laptop,
perhaps Toshiba can still be of help.

I think this is almost to the point of going into file salvage mode and
reset the laptop to factory conditions. On the bright side you will
have a brand new installation and certainly a registry that is nowheres
near to 58MB in size. And Roxio will be eradicated completely... and I
will fade in your memory as one of these bad reoccurring nightmares.

John


Licensed to Quill wrote:

>>Give it a try.
>
> Things are getting very peculiar indeed: Nothing will get this system to see
> that there is a registry there. I have now confirmed that the registry is
> exactly as it was before I made the changes, even gone as far as to repair
> the registry to ensure that what wasn't broken before DEFINITELY isn't
> broken now (the repair utility reports that the registry has been repaired)
> and still the system wont boot to any registry
>
> I also checked that the registry is one which was working before and that
> the backup replacement I tried IS one which was working last June and it is
> (the one in the other directory is one which dates from before I got the
> computer when the original install was done and is only about two megabytes
> as opposed to the recent one which is 7.2 Mb and the June one which is 6.6
> Mb. So the problem isn't with the registry, it is with something preventing
> the system from seeing it. Whatever I do, as I said, I can check by going
> into safe mode boot and it shows verbose mode, goes straight past SYSTEM to
> check for a SYSTEM.ALT file and then stops without reading anything from
> either, telling me immediately that there is no registry.
>
> Not that I have tried it yet but I am even beginning to doubt that I would
> be able to do an in-place upgrade to XP Pro as the install process might not
> see this registry.
>
> Any ideas what might be wrong or is there something on the MS Knowledge
> base about systems not being able to see their perfectly proper SYSTEM files
> which might be relevant to this problem? ( I never managed ot figure out any
> way of checking that source and posting to the win2000.registry group doesnt
> seem to be eliciting any responses)
>
>
Anonymous
January 2, 2005 12:03:49 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

"John John" <audetweld@nbnet.nb.ca> wrote in message
news:%23IkZ%232E8EHA.4004@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> Well, I guess I wasn't clear enough in an earlier post when I said
> "...if this doesn't work you are facing a reinstall of some sort." I
> should have worded that differently, I apologize, I should have said:
> "...this might require a reinstall if things go wrong."
>
> Do you have an Emergency Repair Disk?
> To use emergency repair on a system that will not start
>
http://www.microsoft.com/windows2000/en/advanced/help/d...
>
> What is exact error message that you get? Post it here.

Well things look catastrophic but I dont think they are all that disastrous
in reality: THere is simply (if that if the word) something preventing my
computer from seeing the registry on boot. I have followed the Microsoft
instructions on how to change a registry and it was something in that
procedure whcih caused this problem. After I had executed the commands the
system stopped being able to see its system file. Either system file. No
amount of changing it or trying alternatives (such a 'last knows working
configurtation' which I presume what system.alt is) would help. although I
havent got an emergency repair disc, wouldnt it be easier to try to identify
what is wrong with the system which is preventing it from seeing the
registty?

(I can in fact put a working drive in the Toshiba and create another vanilla
installation if necessary and then create an emergency repair disc if
necessary IF that procedure is open to me with this lousy recovery dsic
which they gave me? I seem to remember when I tried it that during the
create process they ask you for your windows 2000 install disc and I dont
have one so I couldnt create it last time I tried but I could try again to
confirm that this was the problem with this procedure: I might be
remembering the wrong procedure?)
>
> What are the specs on the machine and about how much free space do you
> have on the hard drive?
The Toshiba sis a 650 MHz 256 Meg Pwntium 111 and space on the hard drive IS
a bit of a problem: I only have about 115 meg of space on a HDD of 12 gig.
I can easily free up some of the space by deleting that 58 megabyte file
which I now discover ISNT a backup of the registry which I cant see how I
could need if the problem is simply one of the boot proccess not seeing the
registry.

What is that XP disc that you have? Did you
> install it and activate it elsewhere? Yes, it is a spare XP Pro install
disc which I had used and activated on another computer.

Hardware and space permitting you
> can use it to salvage your files. What is the file system on the
> machine FAT32 or NTFS? Do you have access to a REAL Windows 2000
> install disc?

No
That would be the best way out of this quagmire that I
> and Roxio led you into. If the drive is FAT32, Windows 98 (or even DOS)
> can be used to salvage your files. If your files are small DOS and an
> NTFS DOS reader can be used to salvage them. The drive is slavable to
> another W2K or XP machine but you will need an adaptor cable.
That isnt a real problem as I have a desktop machine which I can put this
notebook drive into to salvage the fiels but I am hoping that I can get this
computer to see its registry somehow as the move process would be
exceptionally laborious, what as I use Microsoft Outlook for all my PIM and
mail: It has a few disastrous faults: Firstly it makes .pst files which are
between 300 Mgagabytes and 500 megabytes in sixe which include all data ever
created by outlook and all email and all data you could in thoery put in
such PIM. Secondly it doesn't crete .iaf files any more so with a dozen
mailboxes, you have to keep careful track of user IDs and passwords now,
which is a bit difficult without access to the Outlook because what you are
doing is to move files on another computer

What is the model number of the laptop,
> perhaps Toshiba can still be of help. I am at the moment in New York and
Toshiba have discontinued all their american support: When you call them
they try to demoralise you into going away: First they try to get all your
personal information out of you v e r y s l o lw l y indeed, repeating every
thing a few times even slower. Then an Indian voce pretends to listen very
carefully to the problem witout taking any of it in. He then (after trying
to wriggle our of helping if you have bought your Toshiba computer with a
global warranty anywhere out of the US, pretends that he is "going to
double check that" and then after an interval of a timed 35 seconds tries to
get you to format your hard drive and use the recovery disc without
bothering to check if you even have a bcakup: Toshiba appparently takes
great joy in THEN finding out that their users have destroyed al their data
and configurations AFTER they have destroyed everything.

I was sorta hoping I could avoid that curious ritual which seems to
consituute TOshiba AMerica's exit from the consumer computer makret by
identifying what is preventing my computer from seeing its registry which is
there and in proper form and (except for the Roxio and SCSI bit) working.
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 6:30:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> John
>

> Does anyone know who makes Toshiba drives or who makes a test utility? What
> is suspicious is that the drive doesn't even read any identification on
> boot.

Maybe Toshiba?
Anonymous
January 3, 2005 9:01:12 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

"Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message > Maybe Toshiba?

It says TOSHIBA on it but I don't believe that they still support drives:
Maybe, but they deny vehemently that they make these things and if you try
to ask them, they just ask you your computer's serial number and jump at the
opportunity to get rid of you if you go down one of their wild goose chases
and tell them.
Anonymous
January 4, 2005 10:47:22 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup,microsoft.public.win2000.applications,microsoft.public.win2000.registry,microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

http://www.toshiba-europe.com/storage/index.asp?nav=RSC...

Licensed to Quill wrote:

> "Bob I" <birelan@yahoo.com> wrote in message > Maybe Toshiba?
>
> It says TOSHIBA on it but I don't believe that they still support drives:
> Maybe, but they deny vehemently that they make these things and if you try
> to ask them, they just ask you your computer's serial number and jump at the
> opportunity to get rid of you if you go down one of their wild goose chases
> and tell them.
>
>
>
!