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Samsung DLP: Leave on or turn off?

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Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 5, 2004 10:52:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I suspect this question has existed since the earliest days of
television and radio....but I wonder if there is a consensus answer as
applies to modern HDTV monitors.

I have a 50" Samsung DLP set that I absolutely love. My question is
about what to do when I have finished watching a for a while, but
intend to start watching again, say, an hour later.

The argument for turning it off for an hour is that the projection
lamp is off and the set is at rest.

The argument for leaving it on is that the bulb and all other
electronics/components are not subjected to start-up transients again,
and one less heating/cooling cycle is experienced.

So what does the group think? How long time duration of not watching
justifies turning the set off?

More about : samsung dlp leave turn

Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 6, 2004 3:31:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I don't really know a lot about DLP tech, but I know a bit about HID
lighting and I would tend to believe that leaving the bulb powered up for an
extra hour would probably be the best way to do it. Mostly unrelated to
this, because it is a different tech, but have you noticed that when a
incandescent light bulb in your house burns out, its usually when you flick
the switch on?

What type of light source does the set use? Metal Halide?

--Dan

"R. Makul" <k1xv@arrl.net> wrote in message
news:en5nj0hberfo5h69ts7rmjv9qs127g7pvv@4ax.com...
> I suspect this question has existed since the earliest days of
> television and radio....but I wonder if there is a consensus answer as
> applies to modern HDTV monitors.
>
> I have a 50" Samsung DLP set that I absolutely love. My question is
> about what to do when I have finished watching a for a while, but
> intend to start watching again, say, an hour later.
>
> The argument for turning it off for an hour is that the projection
> lamp is off and the set is at rest.
>
> The argument for leaving it on is that the bulb and all other
> electronics/components are not subjected to start-up transients again,
> and one less heating/cooling cycle is experienced.
>
> So what does the group think? How long time duration of not watching
> justifies turning the set off?
>
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 6, 2004 3:31:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 23:31:16 GMT, "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote:

>I don't really know a lot about DLP tech, but I know a bit about HID
>lighting and I would tend to believe that leaving the bulb powered up for an
>extra hour would probably be the best way to do it. Mostly unrelated to
>this, because it is a different tech, but have you noticed that when a
>incandescent light bulb in your house burns out, its usually when you flick
>the switch on?
>
>What type of light source does the set use? Metal Halide?
>
>--Dan
>
==============
The lamp is an "ultra high pressure", which I understand to be
different than metal halide.
Related resources
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 6, 2004 4:28:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Dan brings up a good point about light bulbs typically burning out when you
turn the switch on. That may be the case, but let me raise another
possibility. First let me qualify this with the fact that I am no lightbulb
expert! However, what I have heard is that the main cause of the DLP
lightbulbs going out is that they wear out due to all the heat. If that is
true (can anyone confirm/deny?) then I would think that it would be better
to turn it off for that hour so that the bulb can cool down. Again though,
this is a complete guess so anyone more experienced with these bulbs should
feel free to shoot down my theory!

Brad

"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:8lN_c.16269$zj6.12698@newssvr27.news.prodigy.com...
>I don't really know a lot about DLP tech, but I know a bit about HID
> lighting and I would tend to believe that leaving the bulb powered up for
> an
> extra hour would probably be the best way to do it. Mostly unrelated to
> this, because it is a different tech, but have you noticed that when a
> incandescent light bulb in your house burns out, its usually when you
> flick
> the switch on?
>
> What type of light source does the set use? Metal Halide?
>
> --Dan
>
> "R. Makul" <k1xv@arrl.net> wrote in message
> news:en5nj0hberfo5h69ts7rmjv9qs127g7pvv@4ax.com...
>> I suspect this question has existed since the earliest days of
>> television and radio....but I wonder if there is a consensus answer as
>> applies to modern HDTV monitors.
>>
>> I have a 50" Samsung DLP set that I absolutely love. My question is
>> about what to do when I have finished watching a for a while, but
>> intend to start watching again, say, an hour later.
>>
>> The argument for turning it off for an hour is that the projection
>> lamp is off and the set is at rest.
>>
>> The argument for leaving it on is that the bulb and all other
>> electronics/components are not subjected to start-up transients again,
>> and one less heating/cooling cycle is experienced.
>>
>> So what does the group think? How long time duration of not watching
>> justifies turning the set off?
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 6, 2004 10:26:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hmm. There has got to be a better description of that light. There are
"High Pressure Sodium" lamps, but they usually put out a reddish spectrum,
not something I would guess to be in a TV (but maybe!). Anybody got any
info on the exact lamp type?

Whatever it is, it probably uses a high voltage kick to get going, maybe as
much as 4kv. I think that while leaving the bulb on the extra hour, you
spare the bulb some pretty major procedures like letting the bulb cool and
the lamp chemicals changing from the cooling, then hitting it with a big
voltage spike and warming it back up to its REALLY hot temperature. First
step is determining exactly what type of bulb it is.

--Dan

"R. Makul" <k1xv@arrl.net> wrote in message
news:fddnj0p5oqm8ke2oasvtsoopjfnqenrt6u@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 05 Sep 2004 23:31:16 GMT, "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> wrote:

> ==============
> The lamp is an "ultra high pressure", which I understand to be
> different than metal halide.
>
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 6, 2004 12:13:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

By using Google, I was able to determine that the "ultra high
pressure" lamp is a form of mercury vapor lamp with an arc gap, and
such lamps are supposedly is at least twice as efficient as a metal
halide i.e., a 100 watt ultra high pressure produces the same amount
of light as a metal halide. The gap is also supposed to be smaller
than an equivalent output metal halide lamp.

It is Philips technology, and apparently also has uses in video
projectors. Here is a link to a brochure about ultra high pressure
lamps.

www.ewh.ieee.org/r8/germany/ias-pels/m_aachen/uhp_lamp_...
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 6, 2004 12:46:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Heat does seem to be one of the things that is most detrimental to these
lamps, other than physical damage. The way they are mounted in the sets the
second is normally negated.
I service a lot of these sets, inclusive of the Samsung manufacture. Worse
case tends to be when one party switches off the device only to be switched
right back on by another.
IMHO, if you are going right back to viewing the tele, within 5 min or so
leave it on, but leaving the set on for an hour would produce probably as
much heat related stress as switching it off and letting it cool, then back
on after the hour or so.
Also have been seeing a lot of these that not only does the lamp fail but
also does the ballast assembly, the actual power supply for the lamps. These
lamps are rated at a specific time length of operation, be it with the set
in standby without being viewed, or being actually used as a display device.
Therefore by leaving it on the additional hour you will probably be
shortening your actual viewing time.
"R. Makul" <k1xv@arrl.net> wrote in message
news:nukoj0l5s01cl2oudro233prk311e8aad4@4ax.com...
> By using Google, I was able to determine that the "ultra high
> pressure" lamp is a form of mercury vapor lamp with an arc gap, and
> such lamps are supposedly is at least twice as efficient as a metal
> halide i.e., a 100 watt ultra high pressure produces the same amount
> of light as a metal halide. The gap is also supposed to be smaller
> than an equivalent output metal halide lamp.
>
> It is Philips technology, and apparently also has uses in video
> projectors. Here is a link to a brochure about ultra high pressure
> lamps.
>
> www.ewh.ieee.org/r8/germany/ias-pels/m_aachen/uhp_lamp_...
>
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 22, 2004 10:04:38 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Wondering if you could shed some light (no pun intended) on the Ultra
High Pressure Bulb. Are they as bright as the day they are purchased
the day they go out or do they fade over time just like a normal light
source, haven't noticed any fading and have been told they do not fade,
wondering how that is possible...


--
jayissrv
------------------------------------------------------------------------
This message was posted via http://www.satelliteguys.us by jayissrv
Anonymous
a b Ô Samsung
September 23, 2004 5:40:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

If you can find a downloadable copy of the manual for the TV you are
interested in, I would do that - and not trust opinion.

My opinion (see above) is the bulb will fade, but when it does and you
have replaced it, full brightness will be restored - a new tv again! You
can't do that with a plasma screen.



jayissrv wrote:

> Wondering if you could shed some light (no pun intended) on the Ultra
> High Pressure Bulb. Are they as bright as the day they are purchased
> the day they go out or do they fade over time just like a normal light
> source, haven't noticed any fading and have been told they do not fade,
> wondering how that is possible...
>
>
!