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is there a router limit?

Last response: in Networking
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December 15, 2006 8:31:14 AM

I got a router beginner question here, if i may...

I'm curious, if i buy a wireless router. Is there a connection limit that comes with it? I mean, how many PC's can connect to the router (shared internet) simultaneously?

I'm currently on a wired network and the number of PC's connected can be usually determined by the ports. And now i'm thinking of migrating to a wireless network so i could get rid of all these aging cables and its really a mess.

We have around 12 PC's in the office.

Any information would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks~!

More about : router limit

December 15, 2006 1:24:48 PM

Quote:
I got a router beginner question here, if i may...

I'm curious, if i buy a wireless router. Is there a connection limit that comes with it?
Yes.
Quote:
I mean, how many PC's can connect to the router (shared internet) simultaneously?
Depends on the router, and it is not easily found in most manufacturer's specifications, but with 12 computers, you should be fine even with low-end routers (as far as number of connections is concerned). It depends on what they are doing... that is, a single computer will establish multiple connections.
Quote:
I'm currently on a wired network and the number of PC's connected can be usually determined by the ports.
This is not true. You can in-effect "multiply" your ports on your wired router with additional ethernet switches. And, your wired router also has a connection limit.
Quote:
And now i'm thinking of migrating to a wireless network so i could get rid of all these aging cables and its really a mess.
That may be a vaild concern - I can't see your "mess" - but age should have nothing to do with the cables (unless they are starting to mechanically fail - loose connectors and the like). You do need to be aware, however, that unless you are currently operating with a 10-BASE-T wired network, your wireless will be considerably slower, especially if you have all 12 of your clients sharing the same access point. 802.11g wireless is less than 1/4 the bandwidth of 100-BASE-T wired networks, and further, it is a shared medium (rather than the star topology of wired). So, each client will be sharing the 20-25Mbps bandwith, instead of having nearly 100Mbps all to itself and the other computer it is communicating with. Now, with wired there can still be bottlenecks (e.g. your router, your server, your NAS, etc), but your users will probably notice a significantly slower network after you go wireless.

With 12 computers, I am assuming you already have a router in there somewhere.

If you are running at 100BASE-T, what I would recommend is you add an access point to the existing network, keeping your existing wired router performing the routing functions, and proceed step by step, one computer at a time. If you have any ancient computers with 10BASE-T NICs, start with them. They will see improved network performance with the wireless.

If your existing wired network infrastructure (router / hubs, if any, etc.) is 10BASE-T, but your computers have 100BASE-T NIC's, I would upgrade the wired network infrastructure to 100BASE-T. This will be cheaper than going wireless, and your users will be amazed at the increased performance. Then, as above, add an access point and go wireless one computer at a time.
December 16, 2006 4:01:04 AM

Oh thanks~!

I've been looking at different wireless routers and i can't see anything related to my concerns regarding the number of simultaneous connections.

Quote:
I'm currently on a wired network and the number of PC's connected can be usually determined by the ports.

What i meant by this is that, the number of PC's you can typically connect to the network will also depend on available ports either on the router and/or a switch.

Yah i got a router in our 100-BASE-T wired network. I was actually thinking if, I'm going to buy a new wireless router or just an access point for my existing router. No, we don't have any 10baseT computers anymore.

I think I'm going with your suggestion of just adding an access point and go wireless slowly.

Thanks a lot~!!!
December 20, 2006 5:14:54 PM

Another thing to consider, wireless is much more insecure than a wired network. At least with a wired network someone has to physically jack in, with wireless they can sit in the parking lot. Although you can make wireless security pretty tight, doing so is expensive and requires advanced knowledge. For a home wireless is ok, but since you said it's for a business... just think about what the implications would be if someone got access to your systems.
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