Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

I am a newbie w/$2000 for first build

Tags:
  • Homebuilt
  • Next Generation
  • Build
  • Systems
  • Product
Last response: in Systems
Share
March 12, 2007 2:35:38 AM

I want to build my own gaming PC that will be able to run next generation games such as Crysis and UT3. I plan on using the guide on this site to help me put together the computer. My budget is $2000 tops, not including monitor. I have a few questions:

* is it a good idea for a hardware noob to build his own PC from scratch?
* is it possible to combine a 8800 GTS with an eventual 8800 GTX on an SLI mobo?
*if I have windows XP on my old Dell computer can I install it on the new PC, and if not, should I get Windows Vista?

If anybody could take the time to make a suggestion on a setup for me, that would be awesome. I totally understand if a lot of threads like mine pop up and nobody wants to answer!

More about : newbie 2000 build

March 12, 2007 6:18:51 AM

here is a wish list I made on newegg, does this look good? what else do I need?

Unit Price Savings Total Price

Update Antec Performance One P180 Silver cold rolled steel ATX Mid Tower Computer Case - Retail
Model #: P180
Item #: N82E16811129154

Return Policy: Standard Return Policy

In Stock
$124.99 $124.99

Update EVGA 122-CK-NF63-TR LGA 775 NVIDIA nForce 680i SLI ATX Intel Motherboard - Retail
Model #: 122-CK-NF63-TR
Item #: N82E16813188011

Return Policy: Limited 30-Day Return Policy

In Stock
$229.99 $229.99

Update EVGA 640-P2-N825-AR GeForce 8800GTS 640MB GDDR3 PCI Express x16 SUPERCLOCKED HDCP Video Card - Retail
Model #: 640-P2-N825-AR
Item #: N82E16814130080

Return Policy: Standard Return Policy

In Stock
Mail-in Rebate
$409.99 $409.99

Update Thermaltake Toughpower W0128RU ATX12V / EPS12V 650W Power Supply - Retail
Model #: W0128RU
Item #: N82E16817153040

Return Policy: Standard Return Policy

In Stock
$149.99 $149.99

Update Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz LGA 775 Processor Model BX80557E6600 - Retail
Model #: BX80557E6600
Item #: N82E16819115003

Return Policy: Processors (CPUs) Return Policy

In Stock
$313.00 $313.00

Update mushkin 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) with EPP Profile Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model 996533 - Retail
Model #: 996533
Item #: N82E16820146673

Return Policy: Standard Return Policy

In Stock
$224.99 $224.99

Update Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3320620AS (Perpendicular Recording Technology) 320GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM
Model #: ST3320620AS
Item #: N82E16822148140

Return Policy: Limited 30-Day Return Policy

In Stock
$89.99 $89.99

Update NEC 18X DVD±R DVD Burner With 12X DVD-RAM Write Silver E-IDE / ATAPI Model 7170A-0S - OEM
Model #: 7170A-0S
Item #: N82E16827152077

Return Policy: Standard Return Policy

In Stock
$30.99 $30.99

Update Creative Sound Blaster X-Fi XtremeGamer 7.1 Channels PCI Interface Sound Card - Retail
Model #: 70SB073A00000
Item #: N82E16829102006

Return Policy: Standard Return Policy

In Stock
$89.99 -$20.00 Instant $69.99

Update Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - OEM
Model #: ARCTIC SILVER 5
Item #: N82E16835100007

Return Policy: Consumable Items Return Policy

In Stock
$5.99 $5.99

Update ZALMAN 9700 LED 110mm 2 Ball CPU Cooler - Retail
Model #: 9700 LED
Item #: N82E16835118019

Return Policy: Standard Return Policy

In Stock
$79.99 -$20.00 Instant $59.99
Subtotal: $1,709.90
March 12, 2007 6:31:16 AM

First, Welcome to the Forum.
* Yes anyone can build a PC, with good advise and patience.
* no, you cannot mix cards and hope they will run in SLI. Could happen, I doubt it. Also the GTX is such a kick ass card, it will run almost anything for forseeable future.
* No, Dell versions of XP will only work with a Dell BIOS chip, you are better off with a new version of XP with the Upgrade coupon for Vista.

What do you need our advice for, you picked a great set of parts. small tweeks might be there but you have a killer rig planned.
Related resources
March 12, 2007 7:00:10 AM

thanks alcattle,
basically I just want to make sure I have everything needed on this list to build the complete PC aside from monitor, speakers, keyboard and mouse. I am also concerned with compatability and future ability for upgrades (hence the SLI mobo).

I just don't want to order everything and find out something isnt compatable. I want to make sure my first PC build goes smoothly :D 
March 13, 2007 11:25:22 AM

1. Well, there's a first time for everything.
2. No. Must be identical model.
3. Most likely not as OEM PC makers implement some hardware checking mechanism on the install disk so that it installs only on the original computer. You can try. But I strongly sugguest you take advantage of this new build & get one of these:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1683...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1683...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1683...

OEM Windows + free update to Vista.

BTW, your list looks very hot. They're compatible with each other.
March 13, 2007 12:42:50 PM

A little advice on that case. I just completed a mid-range build with the black version of that case. It looked something like:

Western Digital Caviar SE WD3200JS 320GB
AMD Athlon 64 X2 3800+(65W) Windsor 2.0GHz
DFI INFINITY NF ULTRAII-M2 Socket AM2 NVIDIA nForce4 Ultra
EVGA 256-P2-N615-TX GeForce 7600GT 256MB
FSP Group (Fortron Source) ATX400-PA
SAMSUNG 18X DVD±R
CORSAIR XMS2 2GB (2 x 1GB)
Antec Performance One P180B Black

I was a little under-whelmed by the case. It is quite quiet, except for a high-pitched whine that comes from the 120mm fans that are included. It's quiet, and not intrusive to me at all. The fans don't connect to a fanbus or anything like that, either, there's just switches hanging off of them to choose the speed. Oh, yeah, and the optical drives are not acoustically isolated, just HDD and PSU.

The MOST important thing to remember is that the PSU goes at the bottom back of the case. If the power connectors on your board are at the top front, you'll probably need extensions for the ATX block (like I did :(  ). Make sure your PS has LONG cables. I'm REALLY not kidding. Really.

Or, have a look at some other cases. If I had it to do over again, I'd have looked at something from Lian-Li and spent a little more for something with heat-reactive or front-fanbus-controlled fans.

Also, I know it says that there are no sharp edges on the Antec case, but there's this cage that you mount the power supply in (acousticly isolating it by not screwing it directly into the case). That mother is SHARP. I actually used it to open some packaging on the other components I got. That plus the fact that where the PSU comes through the back of the case is riddled with unfinished, sharp, kinda perforated sheet metal fingers (they didn't just cut a smooth hole out of the back of the case for some reason) that scratched me pretty good, too.

Other than that, it's a great case.
March 13, 2007 1:42:04 PM

You can do alot for 2,000.

My suggestion buy a good PSU and good Case to accomodate future upgrades. But don't overspend on PSU and Case! Silverstone cases and PC Power and Cooling PSU are too expensive!

Case: Cooler Master Stacker 830/832, This will accomodate any motherboard, PSU, and long graphics card with no problem - have lots of room for fans for good airflow. Also have removable mobo try, aluminum finish, and lots of expansion bays. You can also try the Thermaltake Armor series which is a bit cheaper.

~$230-260 CM Stacker 830/830 evolution/832 depending on which e-tailer you look at.

PSU: You want at least 700W. Don't have to be modular, but of high quality. Seasonic, BFGs, Hiper, Thermaltake are good. They should have at least 2 12v rails with sufficient Ampere ratings for dual graphics card if you ever consider it. About $200 is what you want to spend on a PSU.

Seasonic M12 700W (4 12v rails, Modular, etc) ~ $150-200

Mobo: For a newbie, I wouldn't recommend Nvidia chipsets, but something like a i975X. Intel BadAxe2, Asus P5W DH, Abit Aw9D-Max for good overclocking, stability, and mature bios.

Or if you can't resist SLI: Try mobo from companies who have been in the game longer. EVGA is fairly new to the game and can hinder your first build experience and give you lots of headaches. Asus, Gigabyte, Abit.


CPU: E6600 is a midrange CPU that will offer good performance. You won't be dissapointed. Good choice.

~$320

CPU HSF: Try stock cooling first. Get some thermal paste that are not adhesive. Installing an aftermarket HSF takes some patience and experience. You can decide if you want to move to aftermarket HSF (Zalmans are good, but the Thermalright Ultra 120 is one of the best)

Video Card: Depends on how much you want to spend. I say at least $400 for next gen games. 8800GTS, preferably an 8800GTX.

~$560

Memory: Don't go cheap. Try Corsair XMS2, Kingston HyperX series. At least DDR2 800MHz for some headspace for overclocking. At least 2GB.

Corsair XMS2 DDR2 800MHz 2x1GB (6400C4) ~ $230

HDD: The HDD you picked is pretty good and sufficient for gaming. Barracudas are reliable with 5 year warranty.

Sound Card: Try On-board and see if you need to upgrade first.



CM Stacker 830/832 ~ $250

Seasonic M12 700W ~ $150 (I got mine from ewiz for 150 with free shipping - does take a week to get to you, newegg have it for 200).

E6600 ~ $315

Mobo ~ $200-250 depending on which one you get

Video ~ EVGA 8800GTX ~ $560

RAM ~ Corsair XMS2 PC6400 ($230) Get the 4-4-4-12 timings (6400C4)

Artic silver 5 ~ $6

HDD~ $100

DVD~ $30

Windows ~ $120-200 OEM Get Vista in my opinion

250+150+315+250+560+230+6+100+30+120 = $2011

This will get you going!

Just my 2 cents!
March 13, 2007 1:47:00 PM

If you are like me and don't plan to overclock, i would suggest in your budget, getting a nvidia 650i mobo (the msi has a good review at anandtech) and some cheaper ddr2 800 ram (g.skill or ocz) and then using that extra cash to get a 8800gtx now.
March 13, 2007 2:11:04 PM

Quote:
CM Stacker 830/832 ~ $250

Seasonic M12 700W ~ $150 (I got mine from ewiz for 150 with free shipping - does take a week to get to you, newegg have it for 200).

E6600 ~ $315

Mobo ~ $200-250 depending on which one you get

Video ~ EVGA 8800GTX ~ $560

RAM ~ Corsair XMS2 PC6400 ($230) Get the 4-4-4-12 timings (6400C4)

Artic silver 5 ~ $6

HDD~ $100

DVD~ $30

Windows ~ $120-200 OEM Get Vista in my opinion


This is a really nice build, too.

The stacker case is gigantic, though.

I'd look at ASUS to fill the MB slot.

If I would've had more money, I would have that E6600 Core2 Duo under my desk right now. Great chip.

I'd recommend one thing, though. I've been reading reviews (here and elsewhere) that Vista hinders performance in some games. I'd check to see if any of the games you play are on that list before making the jump. Personally, I would wait for Vista SP1 to come out before letting go of my XP install, unless you just can't live without the extra desktop eye-candy. Eventually you will need DirectX 10, but not before SP1 is out.

Of course, I run Sabayon Linux, a Gentoo variant with Beryl pre-installed, so I've got all the eye-candy I can stand :D 
March 13, 2007 7:05:25 PM

I'm currently looking at putting together a very similar build, if you can wait for a month or two you might save yourself a decent amount of money... supposedly intel is cutting prices mid-april and with r600 coming in May, if it kicks Nvidia's ass then you can get one of those, and if it doesn't then it will hopefully drop Nvidia's prices a little. Just some food for thought, Cheers.
March 13, 2007 11:48:07 PM

is it a good idea for a hardware noob to build his own PC from scratch

NO!

and there are many reasons why.

One big reason are the ISO specs.

Best thing to do is goto www.alienware.com and get one of their pc's
http://www.alienware.com/product_detail_pages/Area-51_7...

they have great cust support too, and get a 3yr warranty.

If u dont buy from a gaming manufact, then your pc has to be put together ultra carefully, with no static voltage in your body, and must be perfect the first time, or u can wreak havoc with your new parts, and possibly lose your valuable time troubleshooting it.

Furthermore if u build your own as a new person, u will need to buy replacement parts if something fails

Whereas most manufactured pcs get a burn in period to check for defects.
March 14, 2007 1:21:31 AM

BS, you gotta start somewhere with BYO (build your own). ESD is not that bad, just ground yourself before touching anything.

A similar setup from Alienware will cost you anywhere from 3000 - 3500 (Compared to 2000)!!!! Don't believe me, go configure one. An Area 51 comp starts at $2100 with a E6400 CPU, 1GB RAM, 250GB, a 7950GT Video card (+350 for a 8800GTX!!), onboard sound, no monitor. For 2GB RAM you have to add an extra $200!!! Geezus ripoff! You can easily get 2GB for $200 already.

Each individual hardware comes with its own warranty. Barracuda's comes with 5 year, CPU comes with 3 years, etc etc. You can get replacements straight from manufacturer. Alienware, dell and other companies make you pay for something that comes with the product already!

You'll have to pay for extra warranty coverage from Alienware, Dell or other crappy services (You get a limited 1 year and you pay for the rest). For 3 Years you have to pay an extra $190.

You'll get a Windows version full of bloatware!@

Just do your homework and you'll be fine.
March 14, 2007 3:55:46 AM

Thank you all for your insight, I appreciate the fact that you are taking your personal time to offer me your advice!

Nossy,
Although you suggested I switch my mobo to a i975X, I ordered an eVGA 122-CK-NF68-AR nForce 680i SLI on the advice of a member at the Hardforums from zipzoomfly.com for 249.99 w/free shipping. As the order was packaged before I read your post, I cannot cancel it, so I will have to really do my research before making an attempt at building this PC.

In regards to the 8800 video card line, I have read that the GTX will only offer a minimal noticeable performance difference over the 640mb overclocked GTS on systems running with 22" or smaller monitors. I figure if I buy another GTS when prices are much lower (say fall of 07 around the time UT3 comes out), I can run them in SLI mode and still get great performance. Does this sound right to you or am I way off?

Here is a newly updated list for everything else except the motherboard.
Thank you for your suggestions, and if there is something I have missed on the revised list, feel free to let me know! Thanks again!


COOLER MASTER Stacker 830 RC-830-SSN2-GP Silver Aluminum ATX Full Tower Computer Case - Retail
Model #: RC-830-SSN2-GP
Item #: N82E16811119103

Mail-in Rebate
$259.99 -$15.00 Instant $244.99

EVGA 640-P2-N825-AR GeForce 8800GTS 640MB GDDR3 PCI Express x16 SUPERCLOCKED HDCP Video Card - Retail
Model #: 640-P2-N825-AR
Item #: N82E16814130080

Mail-in Rebate
$409.99 $409.99

SeaSonic M12 SS-700HM ATX12V / EPS12V 700W Power Supply - Retail
Model #: SS-700HM
Item #: N82E16817151031

In Stock
$209.99 $209.99

Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz LGA 775 Processor Model BX80557E6600 - Retail
Model #: BX80557E6600
Item #: N82E16819115003

In Stock
$313.00 $313.00

Patriot eXtreme Performance 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model PDC22G6400LLK - Retail
Model #: PDC22G6400LLK
Item #: N82E16820220144

Mail-in Rebate
$224.99 -$10.00 Instant $214.99

Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3320620AS (Perpendicular Recording Technology) 320GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM
Model #: ST3320620AS
Item #: N82E16822148140

$89.99 $89.99

LITE-ON 16X DVD±R DVD Burner Black SATA Model SH-16A7S-05 - OEM
Model #: SH-16A7S-05
Item #: N82E16827106047

$31.99 $31.99

Subtotal: $1,514.94
+ 249.99 eVGA 122-CK-NF68-AR 680i (w/ lifetime warranty)

=$1,764.93
March 14, 2007 5:22:29 AM

Still a bit small on HD space, I might add a 160 GB for OS/booting

Just a kick ass system!!! :!:
March 14, 2007 5:37:12 AM

Quote:
is it a good idea for a hardware noob to build his own PC from scratch

NO!

and there are many reasons why.

One big reason are the ISO specs.

Best thing to do is goto www.alienware.com and get one of their pc's
http://www.alienware.com/product_detail_pages/Area-51_7...

they have great cust support too, and get a 3yr warranty.

If u dont buy from a gaming manufact, then your pc has to be put together ultra carefully, with no static voltage in your body, and must be perfect the first time, or u can wreak havoc with your new parts, and possibly lose your valuable time troubleshooting it.

Furthermore if u build your own as a new person, u will need to buy replacement parts if something fails

Whereas most manufactured pcs get a burn in period to check for defects.



C'mon man, are you a salesman or something? That sounds like a bunch of sales BS if I've ever heard it. I've been working on electronics for years and I've NEVER had any problems with static discharge. I've built 100+ PC's, worked on many more, and worked on thousands of copiers that are more complex and sensitive than most computers and I have not fried a board with static to this day. OK, don't walk around on the carpet dragging your feet for 30min trying to cause static and you will be alright.

Part of the point of building your own PC is the fact that one can put something together that will equal or better the performance of an OEM for less money. Why would he want to go to Alienware and pay too much. If I went by the stock specs of the particular computer you linked to, I could build that same thing for $1242 if I bought everything from Newegg, saving myself $641.55 after shipping is figured in. And that's even with a mouse pad included (like the Alienware) and a TT Armor Extreme case, IMHO much better looking than any Alien box. Oh, yeah the Alien costs $1883.55 as configured and shipped.

Anyway new_guy, like Nossy said, manufacturers have their own warranty and are many times easier to deal with than retailers anyway. You will not have to buy a replacement if something fails, you will just have to wait a few days usually for them to receive the failed unit, test it, and send a new one. I don't think most companies cross ship so that makes it take a little longer, but Western Digital comes to mind as one that does, IIRC.

It sounds like you've done most of the hard part in picking out all the right components that will work together, building the thing isn't all that hard. Just keep your mobo manual handy and double check that everything is plugged in the right places. Most things only go in one place and one way, but the power/LED/reset headers can be confusing on some boards. I'm guessing you have another PC handy you can use to get on here and ask for help if anything comes up, so you should be fine. Good luck!
March 14, 2007 6:33:36 AM

Quote:
First, Welcome to the Forum.
* Yes anyone can build a PC, with good advise and patience.
* no, you cannot mix cards and hope they will run in SLI. Could happen, I doubt it. Also the GTX is such a kick ass card, it will run almost anything for forseeable future.
* No, Dell versions of XP will only work with a Dell BIOS chip, you are better off with a new version of XP with the Upgrade coupon for Vista.

What do you need our advice for, you picked a great set of parts. small tweeks might be there but you have a killer rig planned.


Dell windows works perfectly in other computers. I'm using my dell windows from my laptop in my desktop computer and no problem what so ever. And no there are none dell components in this build. The only thing you will get is a folder in the windows folder, that says "Dell". You can simple delete that if you do not want that folder and nothing bad happens.
March 14, 2007 6:53:23 AM

Thank you. I remembered there is a way to modify the Dell OEM Windows but did not remember the specifics. I have played with Dell for many years and they do many things like that. Of course it is frowned upon by M$ so you your own judgement.
March 14, 2007 10:17:58 AM

Well guys, I pulled the trigger. Decided to go 8800 GTX :) 

Here's the specs:

COOLER MASTER Stacker 830 RC-830-SSN2-GP Silver Aluminum ATX Full Tower Computer Case - Retail

EVGA 122-CK-NF68-AR nForce 680i socket775 SLI motherboard

Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 Conroe 2.4GHz LGA 775 Processor Model BX80557E6600 - Retail

EVGA 768-P2-N831-AR GeForce 8800GTX 768MB GDDR3 PCI Express x16 HDCP Video Card - Retail

Patriot eXtreme Performance 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) Dual Channel Kit Desktop Memory Model PDC22G6400LLK - Retail

SeaSonic M12 SS-700HM ATX12V / EPS12V 700W Power Supply - Retail

Seagate Barracuda 7200.10 ST3320620AS (Perpendicular Recording Technology) 320GB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s Hard Drive - OEM

LITE-ON 16X DVD±R DVD Burner Black SATA Model SH-16A7S-05 - OEM

LITE-ON Black SATA CD-ROM Drive Model LTN-52S1S-10 - OEM

Microsoft Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 SP2b w/Upgrade Coupon for Vista - OEM

Arctic Silver 5 Thermal Compound - OEM

THQ Gift - Supreme Commander PC Game - OEM

Total cost: $2082.01 shipped



Let me know what you think! Thanks for your help in deciding the parts, I am sure I may be needing more help when putting this rig together!
March 14, 2007 10:47:34 AM

You got the best help from the members. This may come in handy:

http://www.pcmech.com/byopc/

I wear an anti-static wrist strap & touch a running psu before handling any pc parts. I don't touch the integrated circuit on a part.
March 14, 2007 11:36:04 AM

I agree with Nossy and FSXFan : PC_Side_Line's advice is wrong.

It's a good idea to build your own PC. Here are some advice:
-Read a lot and learn
-Take your time when building it. Work in a well lit area and use a table so that you can work comfortably
-You can buy an anti-static wrist lanyard
-If you have a friend who has built PCs, might be a good idea to have him assist

You'll learn a lot, your PC will be built on components that you chose and you'll have a good sense of accomplishment.
March 14, 2007 12:07:17 PM

Hey that's a nice setup. The GTS OC is a solid performer, and spending a few extra bucks for the GTX will hold you for a few years. If you plan to go SLI the EVGA mobo is good and the price is not that bad, there are good feedbacks on it and a number of bios version has been released, lots of people are satisfied with it. The i975X chipset only support Crossfire, so you may have not liked it. There is a new Revision A1 (I believe) EVGA mobo that has been released. It's not much difference, but just provide better OC with Kentsfield. If you recieved the older revision board, I believe EVGA offers free exchange.

About the Barracuda HDD, remember to remove the jumper on the back of the drive to enable SATAII or else it is limited to SATA150 transfer rate. It is a tiny boogger and difficult to remove.

Just take your time and do it one step at a time, read about requirements, and don't be in a rush to put everything together. Just remember to plug in the CPU power (Old school BYOers don't realize that the newer CPU requires its own power, my brother didn't plug this in and his comp never POST until I told him about it) and the graphics power. An experienced BYO can fire up a computer in less than 30 min.

As first time builder, avoid setting up RAID arrays and SLI and go simple. If it POST you are in good shape.
March 14, 2007 3:41:59 PM

HEY NOSSY: u ever heard of "BURN in"? maybe u just got off the boat?

maybe u were never involved in the manufacture of 150,000 pcs?

Hardware noobs should always buy from a highly regarded pc manuf because the manuf does a burn in.

Most parts are warranted for a yr, so the 3 yrs is a good insurance policy.

you named a few rare manuf with extended warranties on their parts

Here's Seagate's warranty which u need to brush up on.
http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name...

How Long Does The Coverage Last? Seagate warranty periods are 1 year, 2 years, 3 years or 5 years from the documented date of purchase, depending on the type of product and where it was purchased.

GeT W DA PROGRAM nos sy!
March 14, 2007 4:43:30 PM

LOL. NEWBIES gotta start somewhere, you don't become an "Expert" by sitting on the SIDE LINES.

If you're willing to throw away thousands of dollars to Alienware, Dell, Falcon Northwest, be my guest.

EVERY hardware comes with warranty, 1-5 years (BURN IN takes less than 30 days, which is still within return/exchange policy with Newegg or ZipZoomFly). Hard drives are more likely to die before anything else (especially in Raid 0).

Alienware, Dell , and "highly" regards manufacturers are out there to MAKE money so they will markup prices for profit. If you're a professional gamer and makes tons of money or don't want to deal with putting a computer together then GO AHEAD and pay extra. Be my guest and pay the Geeks Squad $120 for installing a graphics card.

If you're a gamer in 3 years and your CPU/GPU/MEM craps out, it's pretty much OUTDATED and you want something new ANYWAYS. If not, you've grown out of gaming.

DDR3 coming soon, 45nm fabs Penryn in a year so, Bearlake within a year, G90 most likely in 08. I'm sure most gamers who owns a 9800 Radeon probably don't think it's worth dealing with warranty if it craps out today, or would've thrown it away by now.

PC Side Line, maybe you work for Alienware and encourage people to buy from them so you can keep your job.

WE who regularly visit TGForumz, are PC hobbyist who likes to mess around with our PCs, save money AND give advices, also ENCOURAGES those who want to be a part of the BYO community instead of brushing them off and directing them to Alienware.
March 14, 2007 4:45:14 PM

LOL. NEWBIES gotta start somewhere, you don't become an "Expert" by sitting on the SIDE LINES.

If you're willing to throw away thousands of dollars to Alienware, Dell, Falcon Northwest, be my guest.

EVERY hardware comes with warranty, 1-5 years (BURN IN takes less than 30 days, which is still within return/exchange policy with Newegg or ZipZoomFly). Hard drives are more likely to die before anything else (especially in Raid 0).

Alienware, Dell , and "highly" regards manufacturers are out there to MAKE money so they will markup prices for profit. If you're a professional gamer and makes tons of money or don't want to deal with putting a computer together then GO AHEAD and pay extra. Be my guest and pay the Geeks Squad $120 for installing a graphics card.

If you're a gamer in 3 years and your CPU/GPU/MEM craps out, it's pretty much OUTDATED and you want something new ANYWAYS. If not, you've grown out of gaming.

DDR3 coming soon, 45nm fabs Penryn in a year so, Bearlake within a year, G90 most likely in 08. I'm sure most gamers who owns a 9800 Radeon probably don't think it's worth dealing with warranty if it craps out today, or would've thrown it away by now.

PC Side Line, maybe you work for Alienware and encourage people to buy from them so you can keep your job.

WE who regularly visit TGForumz, are PC hobbyist who likes to mess around with our PCs, save money AND give advices, also ENCOURAGES those who want to be a part of the BYO community instead of brushing them off and directing them to Alienware.
March 14, 2007 4:52:51 PM

I agree. I built my 1st new system with help from a friend nearly 10 years ago. That took away my "fright" of building a computer. Rock on AMD K6/2 350.

I just built a new system a couple of weeks ago after 5 years. I had some relearning to do.

Intel C2D E6400
Sapphire Radeon X1950XT
Gigabyte GA-965P-DS3
Antec Sonata II with 450 PSU
OCZ ATI Xfire 2x1GB DDR2 800
Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro (just ordered)

It can be frustrating if one gets a bad part, but that's part of the learning curve.

If "the_new_guy" has questions, he knows where to go.

Btw "the_new_guy" welcome to the club.
March 14, 2007 5:33:46 PM

Quote:
Well guys, I pulled the trigger. Decided to go 8800 GTX :) 



Just some personal thoughts on this. For me, when I buy exactly what I want, I only bitch about the price once. When I settle for something less to save a few bucks, I bitch about the price everytime I use it. :) 

Choosing between a GTX and the GTS would also include how much I would be bitching in the future.

If you really wanted the GTX over the GTS, you made the right decision.
March 15, 2007 10:51:10 AM

Can I borrow it sometime? :lol: 

Really, I don't see you having much trouble putting it together hardware-wise. The only thing I can see even being remotely troublesome is mounting the heatsink. Don't use too much thermal paste, and read and re-read the mounting directions before strapping the thing down. I would also keep an eye on heat for the first week or so, but you'd really have to screw up to overheat in that stacker case.

As for burn-in, you can obviously do this yourself. A quick google search turned up http://overclockix.octeams.com/ as a good free Linux-based canidate with NVIDIA, and some good tools, although it is fairly old, you should be able to grab the newest NVIDIA driver and install it in the liveCD environment. Another good tool would be a Sabayon LiveCD - http://www.sabayonlinux.org/ . This is more current, and comes with fairly recent NVIDIA drivers installed. Plus Beryl comes pre-installed and will startup fine in the liveCD environment. It also comes with the Quake4 demo installed and ready to rock. Beryl has a couple of benchmarks that could be used to do burn-ins. These are both LiveCD's, so they don't touch your harddrive, and are linux-based, so they're free (as in beer). If you're more comfortable with windows, search Google for 'BartPE burn-in' or something similar.

As for the comments posted by PC_Side_Line, he is obviously trolling. Most of what he is saying really is just being alarmist, and I doubt that anyone that was involved in the manufacture of '150,000 pcs' would use such abhorrent spelling and grammar (u != you) and such a belligerent tone. Just take away from his comments that noobs should be careful, and read directions.

Good luck man! Sounds like you're going to have a great machine there!!
March 15, 2007 12:24:03 PM

Here are a couple suggestions:

1. Spend the money on a 750-850W 8800 SLI capable PSU (I'd suggest PC Power and Cooling or Etasis). If you're considering about going SLI later (which it seems you are since your spending $ on 680i), you'll be kicking yourself for not spending the money up front.

2. Good choice with eVGA 680i. I've been running two for a couple months now and have found them to be great OC'ers and have a great layout. Also eVGA customer service and warrenty are top-notch imo. However, if you're considering going quad-core in the future, there was just a revision allowing for more OC headroom. EVGA will allow you to RMA with free shipping for the revision.

3. I might hold off on getting an e6600 and save money with an e4300 at this juncture (and OC it a bit). Intel has a C2D revision/major price drops coming in June, and you'll essentially be able upgrade to a 3.0ghz dual core or 2.4ghz quad core for around that price.

4. Get a 3.5 diskette drive. Although a lot of people will tell you they are obsolete, it is always good to have a back up drive for BIOS flash, RAID drivers etc.

5. If you are going to OC, by all means, get a good aftermarket hsf: it really does make a difference. I'd suggest the Scythe Infinity since it keeps cool and is the easiest hsf to install on 680i (you don't need to remove the motherboard to install/remove). Zalman 9700 is also good, but more difficult to install due to the backplate.

5. Don't be intimidated about DIY. I think if more people knew how easy (and fun) it was, Dell would be in big trouble. Just take your time, take precautions ahead of time, and USE GOOD LIGHTING. If you get frustrated, walk away for a bit and come back. If something doesn't work, send it back - Either NewEgg or the manuafucturers will cover the replacement.

Edit: I'd also agree with your choice to move up from GTS to GTX. While performance on these two cards are comparable now, I expect the extra memory and stream processors on the GTX will be more noticable in DX10 games.
March 15, 2007 9:58:53 PM

Hmm, so you think the 700W SeaSonic won't provide enough juice for a second GTX in SLI ?

Also, I was planning on eventually overclocking the E6600 to around 3.0ghz, is this going to be enough to handle UT3, Crysis on high settings?

I will pick up a floppy drive at the local computer store for sure!

And thanks about the heads up on that guy trying to scare me into buying an overpriced Alienware... I thought he was a troll, thanks for confirming it:) 

A note for those buying an eVGA mobo:
I made the mistake of ordering the 122-CK-NF68-AR when I should have gotten the 122-CK-NF68-A1

According to the eVGA website, the AR version has a lifetime warranty and I can exchange it for the A1 if I want to do hardcore overclocking on a quad core in the future. If you are looking at these boards, go for the A1 so you don't have to worry about this. (thanks for mentioning it Nossy, unfortunately I made a bit of an impulse buy on the mobo...)

Thanks for the help everyone!
March 16, 2007 4:33:12 AM

No, that Seasonic 700W will not do well with two 8800 GTX's, especially if you're OC'ing. Get a PC Power and Cooling 750W or an Etasis 850W.

Just send that 680i AR back to eVGA for a 680i AI. Unless you're happy with dual core and don't think you're going to upgrade to quad core. IMO, you'll probably want to build an entirely new system by the time quad cores are prevelamt (1 1/2 - 2 years).

In any case, don't be bummed about what you bought. It's all great stuff and you should be very happy for months to come.
March 16, 2007 12:48:00 PM

The seasonic m12 700W is fine for his setup. Moderate OC is fine. The conroes are power efficient (Unless you went with a kentsfield you may want to upgrade to 850W+). My friend have an M12 running with 2 8800 GTX SLI + Abit IN9 32X MAX + E6600 (3.2GHz OCd) + 150GB Raptor X + 4GB Corsair Dominator and its fine. The PC Power and Cooling 750 is also an excellent choice and provide insane ampere on a single +12V rail.

Also, unless you're looking to drive very high resolution at good fps, a powerful single card solution is good enough for any games. Save your money from buying that 2nd card (~400-600) for next year's upgrade which will serve you better - especially considering G80 is 1st generation DX10 card which you probably don't want to invest more than you already have. As previous trends have indicated, by next year or so Microsoft will probably revise DX10 to DX10 version b/c, Shader Model version beyond 4.0 (4.0b or c) once DX10 games trickle into the masses and they find all sorts of loopholes and bottlenecks.

And new guy, what you have is a killer rig. It will serve you well for awhile. A1 revision is mainly for those with kentsfield who want to OC higher than 350FSB+. You don't even need it unless you have bought a kentsfield and is dissapointed with overclocking - the AR will still work with kentsfield and moderate overclock.
March 24, 2007 6:10:10 AM

I just want to give a big THANK YOU to those people who made my PC possible.

I can safely say that my new system SMOKES Quake 4 at max settings, and to the new games out there I say "BRING 'EM ON!!!"

After a few days of headaches with my mobo not POSTing and a thread over at the eVGA boards, I finally got the system up and running and its like a huge boulder being lifted off my chest...

but it would not have been possible without the initial help I received from all YOU guys here at TOMS HARDWARE FORUMZ in deciding the parts I needed to build a kick ass system!

Thanks again!

My specs (for ~2k recommended by users here):
CoolerMaster 830 case
eVGA 680i motherboard
e6600 CPU
eVGA 8800GTX gfx card
2gig Patriot DDR2 ram
SeaSonic M12 700W psu
Seagate Barracuda 320gb HD
Lite On DVD/CD
March 24, 2007 6:40:28 AM

What cpu cooler did you decide on? Just so you know the tuniq tower is a better cooler then the zalman and cheaper.

Anyways glad you made it yourself instead of taking others poor advice of going to alienware.com and buying a pre-built ripoff :wink: .
March 24, 2007 7:06:19 AM

ehh.. heh.

I went with stock cooling, I know it is not recommended but I have not yet decided to overclock the 6600... and where I live, it's cold until June.. so I definitely need to find a better cooling solution before then, but the great thing about this case is it offers (4) 120mm fan options mounted on the side of the case directly over the motherboard!

As far as the heatsink/CPU cooler itself I will look to Tuniq or something cheaper than Zalman.
March 24, 2007 2:28:04 PM

wow sideline i don't know where you get your paranoia from but it is real sad to see someone discourage another person from learning a valuable lesson. i put my first computer together back when my dad owned a company specializing in that (back in the day when cd-rom drives first came out) and all the help i ever got was "well there are the parts put it together". didn't fry anything on that comp or on the countless others i have built since then. i think you may be in the wrong forum if you want to try and stop someone from helping themselves.
March 24, 2007 3:19:48 PM

Welcome to the club new_guy.

My suggestion would be to drop the whole SLi idea from the get-go. Most of the time, it only really speeds you up by ~%50. Sometimes, your performance will double, sometimes your computer will crash until you disable the 2nd card. Depends on the game.

Take the money you save by not getting a SLi mobo and second video card and put it away in a savings account and forget about it. In a year or 2 when you're itching to upgrade again, break out the savings and get the fastest single-card solution you can afford at the time.
March 25, 2007 2:17:16 AM

A little late for the motherboard thing, but i must agree sli is not worth it in the long run.
March 25, 2007 3:28:20 AM

Quote:
LOL. NEWBIES gotta start somewhere, you don't become an "Expert" by sitting on the SIDE LINES.

If you're willing to throw away thousands of dollars to Alienware, Dell, Falcon Northwest, be my guest.

EVERY hardware comes with warranty, 1-5 years (BURN IN takes less than 30 days, which is still within return/exchange policy with Newegg or ZipZoomFly). Hard drives are more likely to die before anything else (especially in Raid 0).

Alienware, Dell , and "highly" regards manufacturers are out there to MAKE money so they will markup prices for profit. If you're a professional gamer and makes tons of money or don't want to deal with putting a computer together then GO AHEAD and pay extra. Be my guest and pay the Geeks Squad $120 for installing a graphics card.

If you're a gamer in 3 years and your CPU/GPU/MEM craps out, it's pretty much OUTDATED and you want something new ANYWAYS. If not, you've grown out of gaming.

DDR3 coming soon, 45nm fabs Penryn in a year so, Bearlake within a year, G90 most likely in 08. I'm sure most gamers who owns a 9800 Radeon probably don't think it's worth dealing with warranty if it craps out today, or would've thrown it away by now.

PC Side Line, maybe you work for Alienware and encourage people to buy from them so you can keep your job.

WE who regularly visit TGForumz, are PC hobbyist who likes to mess around with our PCs, save money AND give advices, also ENCOURAGES those who want to be a part of the BYO community instead of brushing them off and directing them to Alienware.



and a BURN!!

I built my first PC for a friend Nov of last year and now im going to build one for myself in a couple weeks. Its not as bad as some say. I would recommend getting this static bracelet though:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

It seems you have done your research, just remember that parts can be DOA and you will have to RMA them.

Its fun to build a PC, the warranties are long and the tech support ok.
PC SideLine is just an a$$hole and he doesnt belong on this forum.

GOOD LUCK :D  :D 
!