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Will my 22" monitor suport HD?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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March 12, 2007 6:56:03 AM

I have an Acer monitor that does not have HDCP. I'ver heard that some guys have "cracked" the HD DVD codes. Does this mean that I can watch HD DVDs on my monitor with the right DVD decoder? Do I need an HD DVD player still?

I am interested in getting a tv card so that I can watch television through my PC. Does anyone have some basic beginner advice. I don't want to spend very much.

More about : monitor suport

March 12, 2007 10:23:31 AM

The cracking was done for the built in security so you can watch it on any monitor without the signal being downgraded or copy the film
You will still need a player that can read the disk
March 12, 2007 11:11:43 AM

If you want to buy a solution

AnyDVD HD comes with same functionality as AnyDVD, but with additional features for full HD-DVD (High Definition DVD) and Blu-Ray support, including decryption of HD-DVD & Blu-Ray movie discs.

Allows you to watch movies over a digital display connection, without HDCP compliant graphics card and HDCP compliant display. No need to buy an expensive monitor. Sweet!

Playback your discs on your PC with PowerDVD Ultra, which otherwise do not run (titles released by Studio Canal, The Weinstein Company, Kinowelt, Optimum Releasing).
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March 12, 2007 12:23:57 PM

Quote:
I have an Acer monitor that does not have HDCP. I'ver heard that some guys have "cracked" the HD DVD codes. Does this mean that I can watch HD DVDs on my monitor with the right DVD decoder? Do I need an HD DVD player still?

I am interested in getting a tv card so that I can watch television through my PC. Does anyone have some basic beginner advice. I don't want to spend very much.


You still need a HD-DVD player/read (otherwise how is the "cracked" movie going to get on your computer?). Also, can you even find the code to the crack? From what I understand the encryption scheme isn't easy to crack. Of course, the guys who crack it are math nuts with alot of free time (or are getting paid). Do you really want to download a 50GB movie? O.o

Cracking the code just allows you to rip the movie to your hard drive and burn it to another disc/device.

Honestly, I am not sure if that means you can watch it on your monitor or not, but my guess is not. Note, this is a guess.

I honestly wouldn't be worried about HD-DVD or BlueRay for at least another 18 months. They are still very expensive and in the very early adoption stage of development, trying to work the kinks out, dominate the market, etc. New GPU's are coming out *should* have HDCP built in, as should new monitors. Prices on LCD's continue to drop. A monitor I bought for $750 18 months ago now costs barely over 350. Nothing I can do about it. Hell, I can get a 24" Dell widescreen for $750 now. Ok, Enough rambling.
March 12, 2007 1:07:03 PM

My understanding is that, due to the large number of TVs which have been sold without the neccesary HDMI interface, the content protection has not yet been enabled by any studio and won't be before 2010. So the answer is yes, assuming that you have a drive that will read HD content then you will be able to see it on your monitor.

Incidentally, you would still be able to watch protected content, but it would degrade to standard DVD quality.

I could be wrong, but I think the 'crack' mentioned refers to the disk copy protection scheme. This is a quite seperate system which protects the actual content of the disk. The confusingly name High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection system is an encryption scheme which prevents viewing of protected video in HD format. There are apparently severe flaws in this too, so I have no doubt it will be cracked very shortly after the first studio decides to implement it.
March 19, 2007 9:54:59 PM

yeah, as of right now, you have nothing to worry about and things should work fine. some things to keep in mind:

- all solutions that will copy the files from a disc to your hard drive, will crack the encryption needed to play the files at full resolution without the need for any HDCP support.

- as someone mentioned earlier, you will only run into full output resolution if the major movie studios decide to put special limitations on the movie. these statements by the movie industry are base-less threats designed to get people to support standards like HDCP and HDMI which make the industry more money. even if they are not just lying, this definitely wont happen for a few years anyway.

- WAY before those few years i just mentioned pass, there will be plenty of schemes to get around this issue. within a a year, the new disc types will be as easy to crack as dvd's are now.

personally, i would wait at least a couple months for prices to come down if nothing else. but in the long run, i dont anticipate this being a problem.
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