Socket 754 Processor troubleshooting...

This is a semi-long story I'll make it brief.

My PSU blew up 3 weeks ago, and I mean literally blew up... as in visual smoke. It also shorted out my motherboard with it. I was using an (outdated I know) socket 754 3000+ processor. My brother and I replaced the mobo with the best I could find and everything worked great... for about a week. Suddenly while my wife was surfing the internet she lost control of mouse and keyboard functions... they came back but then the display went blank and then suddenly the whole computer shut down. I could get it to turn on but only for a few seconds at a time and nothing would come up on the screen. I figured that it was either the PSU or the Mobo... I tested another PSU with it and still nothing so I determined that it MUST be the motherboard. Last night I was pulling the motherboard out so I could RMA it when something very curious happened... as I took off the heatsink, to get to the processor, the heat sink came up... with the processor attatched, thanks to the arctic silver thermal compound. Apparently when my brother reinstalled the proc into the new motherboard he didn't install it all the way and the lever clampy that holds the processor in did absolutely nothing. My idea is that the heatsink clamps held the processor in place and kept all the pins in contact, as I was able to use my computer for over a week with no problems, but with the vibration it might have come loose and caused a problem.

My questions are...

Would this kind of short in the processor cause permanent damage to the processor?
Is this kind of short something that could have happened?
Could it be that my mobo is just bad?
Would a bad processor cause my computer to just not do anything, or should something come up?
...or something else?

Any help is very appreciated.
17 answers Last reply
More about socket processor troubleshooting
  1. Quote:
    Last night I was pulling the motherboard out so I could RMA it when something very curious happened... as I took off the heatsink, to get to the processor, the heat sink came up... with the processor attatched, thanks to the arctic silver thermal compound. Apparently when my brother reinstalled the proc into the new motherboard he didn't install it all the way and the lever clampy that holds the processor in did absolutely nothing. My idea is that the heatsink clamps held the processor in place and kept all the pins in contact, as I was able to use my computer for over a week with no problems, but with the vibration it might have come loose and caused a problem.


    When uninstalling the HS, need to be sure you twist the HS back and forth to break the bond that the thermal grease has on it. If you don't break the bond, nothing will stop the CPU being pulled off the socket. (shouldn't matter if it was AS5)

    As long as the pins were not broken in getting the HS off, the CPU has a good chance that it will work. Hard to say why it doesn't power up or POST.

    Have you tried running the system with just the video card, 1 stick ram?

    Does the system give any beeps indicating there's a problem?
  2. none of the pins are broken. Should I try it without the processor and ONLY a stick of ram and the video card?

    If that's the case, then maybe it is the motherboard that is bad as the processor appears to be in perfect shape. Another thing that makes me think it's the mobo is that the keyboard and mouse stopped working for a sec and then the display turned off and then the computer shut down and is in it's non-working state. Would a bad processor cause this to happen?
  3. Quote:
    When uninstalling the HS, need to be sure you twist the HS back and forth to break the bond that the thermal grease has on it. If you don't break the bond, nothing will stop the CPU being pulled off the socket. (shouldn't matter if it was AS5)

    Obviously you've never used AMD procs. You cant twist AMD HS's more than a few degrees.
  4. Anytime the Keyboard/Mouse tends not to respond doesn't necessarily mean that its the MB has problems. Even memory or RAM can cause problems that would make the keyboard or mouse to lock up.

    Defective RAM can also prevent the MB from powering up or POST'ing correctly since it can't execute anything, as far as system beeps, or displaying error message.

    Theres so much that can effect a PC to boot up right, just have to do allot of trouble shooting to figure it out.
  5. Quote:
    When uninstalling the HS, need to be sure you twist the HS back and forth to break the bond that the thermal grease has on it. If you don't break the bond, nothing will stop the CPU being pulled off the socket. (shouldn't matter if it was AS5)

    Obviously you've never used AMD procs. You cant twist AMD HS's more than a few degrees.

    Errr, I haven't with 754 sockets or above. :lol:

    But you do need to wiggle or twist to break the bond. I've seen some videos that it doesn't have much room, but how else are you going to break the bond?

    Even the P4 stock HSF was very hard to wiggle in order to get the HSF off, though it had clamps that pulled the HS up.
  6. Yes well the 754 and up sockets have a retention bracket that prevents all but the slightest movements of the HS, mainly coz its a rectangular shape and the HS fits nicely into it. Have a look:

    http://www.hardinfo.com/art/site/pic/motherboard/Socket754/epox_ep8kda3plus/socket-754.jpg

    You aint going to move a nicely seated HS in that thing.

    @OP I had the same problem, AS5 kept my cpu nice and stuck to the HS and I pulled it out. And the clamp was fully in place too. No damage luckily, just make sure you pull it straight up or prepare for bent pins.

    EDIT: As for how do you break the bond, you could heat up the thing with some heavy load for a few minutes and that should make the AS5 a little more cooperative if you know what I mean.
  7. Sorry guy, I'm with Grimmy on this one.
    You don't try to wiggle until you have released the holddowns for the hsf, just like for any other socket. Once the retention spring is loose, there is louds of wiggle room. Yes, I have done it on quite a few 754 boards, and a lot of 939 boards.
  8. Well, here's the video I'm reffering to:

    Installing a Processor and Heatsink - 939

    Takes some time to load, but the part that shows the "Heatsink Removal" shows the steps of what you should be doing to prevent pulling the CPU off the socket.

    Edit:

    Notice it doesn't talk about AS5, but even it's own thermal base compound.
  9. I've never heard of anyone being able to clamp down a 754 hsf, without pushing the chip all the way into place. If you did, and somehow didn't lock the chip in place, you might have had poor contact between the chip and socket. That could cause almost any kind of problem, once the pins heated up. If that were the case, it would not likely damage either the chip or the mobo.
    Your best bet now would be to re-install everything properly and see what happens.
  10. Well, I've done all that a couple times and still I get the same results. I guess the problem must be in the motherboard. I guess it just seemed strange to me that the proc came straight up still being latched in.

    The system should still POST and at least do SOMETHING if the processor was bad right?
  11. Quote:
    The system should still POST and at least do SOMETHING if the processor was bad right?


    Depends, really. If the CPU was not working at all, it would almost be like trying to power up your MB without a CPU. On the other hand, if it was working but had problems, the bios screen would display an error message, or system beeps would indicate a problem with the CPU, that is if the CPU is the problem.
  12. Thanks alot Grimmy. I think that with what you've said and others I think it's probably the mobo... I'll run some more tests tonight and see what happens. For the record I've never tried to boot a computer without a CPU installed. What exactly is supposed to happen?
  13. Basically.. nothing happens.

    I do recall my old PIII 800 (slot version) mhz machine. The CPU had a crack in the die, guessing from fan vibrations, not to mention its over 8 years old. :lol:

    But, the machine would not boot, screen stayed blank. Popped in my other old PII 400, and it fired right up.

    I've really had no AMD CPU's go out.. yet. :lol:

    Edit:

    Though its pretty hard to determine if the CPU is bad these days with the IHS covering the core, and not having spare parts to test them on. On my old PII and PIII I was lucky to have 2 systems around to swap parts around.
  14. That's a problem not locking down, seen it before and it'll do bad things like you're experiencing. maybe some were in and some weren't.
    Get another board or test your CPU in another.
  15. yea I know. The weirdest part is that everything ran fine for about a week or so and then suddenly just died, and that's what makes me think that the motherboard was just a bad one. I do wish I had another rig to test it in but sadly I don't know ANYONE that has a socket 754 proc still... I really just need something to last me for 6 months when the wife gave me permission to build a new system.
  16. I had one until about 2-3 months ago, then I sold it to someone using an athlon xp.
  17. yea, the PSU blew up and I replaced the mobo and the PSU and it ran fine for about a week or so and then all this started happening... where it won't get any power. I know the video card is fine because I tested it in another machine and the HD is fine because I backed my stuff up in another machine. The problem was trying to determine whether it was the CPU having trouble or the new motherboard I just put in.
Ask a new question

Read More

CPUs Processors Motherboards Socket