Uninstalling Applications across enterprise?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

Hi,

Has anyone tried doing remote uninstalls of applications?

I was looking at some of my own installs, and it seems a bit complicated:

1. Actual "image" on the app server (EXEs, DLLs, Configs etc)
2. Local machine HKLM settings
3. HKCU in roaming profile
4. Local machine shortcuts
5. Shortcuts in roaming profiles (both start menu and desktop)
6. Mix of InstallShield, MSI and others
7. Probably some other stuff I haven't even thought of!

One of the issues that I thought of straight away is that if I uninstall
a "server based" application from Workstation #1, it will zap the
"image" from the app server at that point, so no point trying to run the
official uninstaller from Workstation #2 because the "Program Files"
have already been deleted!

--
Gerry Hickman (London UK)
4 answers Last reply
More about uninstalling applications enterprise
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    I'm not quite sure I follow.

    For large organizations, you would use Active Directory domain and group
    policy.

    You could:
    a) assign apps to computers. This means that anybody who sits at this
    computer, gets the app.
    b) assign app to users. This means that on whichever computer user logs in,
    he/she would get the app.
    c) publish to user. This means that user can install app either from Control
    Panel or by clicking on file with registered extension.

    When you no longer need the app, you would uninstall it using group policy
    again.

    The best results would be achieved using Windows Installer (msi files).
    There are plenty of tools for packaging and distributing apps. Check
    InstallShield and WinInstall.

    You may also wish to check capabilities of Systems Management Server (and
    possibly Microsoft Operations Manager).

    Dusko Savatovic

    "Gerry Hickman" <gerry666uk@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:e4zt7tMnEHA.2948@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Has anyone tried doing remote uninstalls of applications?
    >
    > I was looking at some of my own installs, and it seems a bit complicated:
    >
    > 1. Actual "image" on the app server (EXEs, DLLs, Configs etc)
    > 2. Local machine HKLM settings
    > 3. HKCU in roaming profile
    > 4. Local machine shortcuts
    > 5. Shortcuts in roaming profiles (both start menu and desktop)
    > 6. Mix of InstallShield, MSI and others
    > 7. Probably some other stuff I haven't even thought of!
    >
    > One of the issues that I thought of straight away is that if I uninstall a
    > "server based" application from Workstation #1, it will zap the "image"
    > from the app server at that point, so no point trying to run the official
    > uninstaller from Workstation #2 because the "Program Files" have already
    > been deleted!
    >
    > --
    > Gerry Hickman (London UK)
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Hi Dusko,

    > I'm not quite sure I follow.

    Sorry for not explaining very well.

    > For large organizations, you would use Active Directory domain and group
    > policy.

    Yes, but not all software comes packaged as MSI. I have for example
    SPSSv11 (statistical analysis software) and I need to uninstall the old
    version across all machines and then roll out the new version.

    Most of the application files are on a file server, but each client
    machine has HKLM and each user has HKCU and a wadge of files in their
    user profile. There are then shortcuts both on the local machine and
    also in the user's profile (start menu stuff).

    The goal is to do a clean uninstall across all machines. The installer
    technology it uses is the old InstallShield one.

    --
    Gerry Hickman (London UK)
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Well,

    MSI technology was introduced with Windows 2000 in (at least) 1999.
    Actually, even before that year.
    It was and still is a key technology for rolling out applications.

    If the original application is not packaged with a tool that produces MSI,
    there are various third party tools that can repackage old apps. There is a
    free one called WinInstall LE available at:
    http://www.ondemandsoftware.com/freele.asp

    There are other commercial products like WinInstall 8.5 from the same
    manufacturer as above and InstallShield, which is also considered a leader
    in the app packaging field.

    You may also consider Symantec Ghost 8 Corporate edition which includes some
    software distribution tools. You may check its features at:
    http://sea.symantec.com/content/product.cfm?productid=9

    If none of these solutions work for you, I'm afraid you'll have to design
    your own. You'll probably have to write some custom scripts.

    Dusko Savatovic

    "Gerry Hickman" <gerry666uk@yahoo.co.uk> wrote in message
    news:%23hWoPsAoEHA.2784@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > Hi Dusko,
    >
    >> I'm not quite sure I follow.
    >
    > Sorry for not explaining very well.
    >
    >> For large organizations, you would use Active Directory domain and group
    >> policy.
    >
    > Yes, but not all software comes packaged as MSI. I have for example
    > SPSSv11 (statistical analysis software) and I need to uninstall the old
    > version across all machines and then roll out the new version.
    >
    > Most of the application files are on a file server, but each client
    > machine has HKLM and each user has HKCU and a wadge of files in their user
    > profile. There are then shortcuts both on the local machine and also in
    > the user's profile (start menu stuff).
    >
    > The goal is to do a clean uninstall across all machines. The installer
    > technology it uses is the old InstallShield one.
    >
    > --
    > Gerry Hickman (London UK)
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Dusko Savatovic wrote:

    > If the original application is not packaged with a tool that produces MSI,
    > there are various third party tools that can repackage old apps.

    Yes, but not once they're all installed!

    > If none of these solutions work for you, I'm afraid you'll have to design
    > your own. You'll probably have to write some custom scripts.

    Yup, that looks like the best option.

    --
    Gerry Hickman (London UK)
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