Unattended Installation

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

Hello,

First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most detailed
information/instructions possible.

As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+ computers where
they currently have to do individual installation each time they build a new
system. I have been asked to try and find out if there is a way to automate
the installation of windows so that the installation is unattended and that
it can be run on a variety of hardware configurations. Could someone please
give me some guidance on this subject?

Thanks,

Daniel
15 answers Last reply
More about unattended installation
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Just a little additional question. I was wondering is it possible to not
    only automate the windows 2000 workstation installation but also at the same
    time, the installation of MSoffice. Ultimately the ideal goal is to be able,
    from a boot disk???, turn on the new or old computer and have it
    automatically get wiped clean (if it isn't already) and then proceed to
    install windows, office and possibly a couple of other routine programs.

    Thank you once again for your insight!

    Daniel

    "Daniel" wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most detailed
    > information/instructions possible.
    >
    > As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+ computers where
    > they currently have to do individual installation each time they build a new
    > system. I have been asked to try and find out if there is a way to automate
    > the installation of windows so that the installation is unattended and that
    > it can be run on a variety of hardware configurations. Could someone please
    > give me some guidance on this subject?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Daniel
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Daniel!

    Howdy and welcome to Microsoft Windows! I hope that things go well for you.
    Please listen and understand, though, that things are going to be very
    frustrating for you along your journey. Things will finally become more and
    more clear for you. But that takes time. And that precious thing called
    experience. Some people might call it making a ton of mistakes! Hopefully
    you will avoid the majority of those mistakes by posting questions in these
    newsgroups. I would also S _T_R_O_N_G_L_Y suggest that you go to the
    WIN2000.Active_Directory newsgroup as well. Both will be big helps to you.

    Anyway, to your questions.

    There are actually several answers to your questions. I will try to keep
    the number of answers to a minimum as you might become overwhelmed with all
    of the possibilities. I will try to keep it all very basic ( remember the
    first day of Business School - you learned how to K-I-S-S.... ).

    One possibility is to use RIS, or Remote Installation Services. This is
    available on WIN2000 and WIN2003 and requires Active Directory, DNS and
    DHCP. You would create an image ( usually the i386 folder ) to a shared
    folder on the server and then create a RIS Boot Disk. Once you have this
    you go to the problem computer, stick in the RIS Boot Disk and reboot.
    WIN2000 Pro or WIN XP Pro will be installed on the system. Now, this does
    not take care of the deployment of Applications. We will look at that in a
    second.

    One of the possible limitations of RIS is that there are a limited number of
    NICs that RIS supports. Another is that the computer acount will be created
    in the default COMPUTERS container. Why is this a problem? The deployment
    of applications via GPOs. We will touch on this later. This can be changed
    by pre-staging the computer account ( in WIN2000 ) or changing the default
    location of the computers ( in WIN2003 ).

    One of the major advantages - over the network boot disk - is that you do
    not first have to format the hard drive of the workstation. RIS takes care
    of that for you....

    Another possibility is to use a network boot disk. I really like BART's
    Boot Disk. He has a 'modular' boot disk that is really neat. You can
    visit his site at http://www.nu2.nu. Patrick over at
    http://sourceforge.net/index.php has another boot disk that looks really
    neat. It is more Linux based. With a network boot disk you need to have
    the 'source' available. This, again, would be in the form of copying over
    the i386 folder to a shared folder on a network server. You can even
    include the default location of the computer account object with this method
    without having to do any of the pre-staging things. Kinda neat.

    One of the disadvantages, though, is that you need to have a clean hard
    drive. So, you would need to format the hard drive disk first.

    You can also use the 'default' CD-ROM Media with a floppy disk that holds
    the winnt.sif file ( or the answer file ). All you do is simply create the
    winnt.sif file, put it on a floppy disk, drop in the CD-ROM Media in the
    CD-ROM Drive and reboot ( just make sure that it is set to boot from the CD
    before the HDD ).

    Another possibility is to create a bootable CD-ROM that has the OS and some
    other applications so that your need to manually install things after this
    is minimized.

    One of the nice things about these is that you can slipstream the Service
    Pack. So, for example, if you are still using WIN2000 you could create an
    image ( again, simply copying the I386 folder to a shared network
    folder.....well, simply put ) and then 'slipstream' SP4 to it. So, when you
    use this image the computer is going to have WIN2000 SP4 installed. This
    saves you the time of having to later install the Service Pack. You can
    also, through the use of QChain, install a lot of the Critical Updates.....

    All of these possible solutions require that you have some sort of 'answer
    file'. This answer file give the installation all of the 'answers' to the
    'questions' that are asked during a normal installation of WIN2000 or WINXP
    Pro. They are really neat. And very flexible.

    Then there is always the 'imaging software' - such as Ghost and Drive Image.
    I will not speak too much about these other than to say that if you are
    going to use them then you need to know about sysprep.

    I like RIS and /or the network bootable disk solutions.

    You can install a lot of software via Group Policy. MS Office 2000, Office
    XP and Office 2003 are perfect candidates for this. This is a whole other
    part of Active Directory. For the Office Applications you would need what
    is called an 'Administrative Installation' - which you perform via the
    setup.exe /a switch. You would then 'install' it to a shared folder on a
    server. You can also install non-MS software via Group Policy. The key here
    is that there is an .msi file. If you do not have an .msi file then you can
    not use Group Policy to deploy the software. But, you can create an .msi
    file. Or .zap file.

    For Office you can include a transforms file, or .mst file. This allows you
    to have multiple Office installations. For example, the people in
    Accounting get Outlook, Word and Excel while the people in Finance get
    Outlook, Word, Excel and Access. Naturally, the people in Sales do not need
    Access so they get PowerPoint instead!

    Another very important fact is that when you are creating the packages for
    deployment you have to tell AD where the .msi file is ( for example, in
    Office 2000 it is data1.msi ). You must use the UNC naming convention (
    \\servername\sharename ) when doing this. That is to say that you can not
    use any mapped network drive ( T:\office 2000\Office\data\data1.msi ) as the
    install will fail.

    Daniel, as you can see there are a lot of possibilities. 45 users is very
    small. Once you get everything automated your life will be very easy. One
    of the wonderful things about deployment of applications via GPO is that
    these applications will 'self-heal'. Say one of your users deletes the
    WinWord.exe file on his computer. Well, normally MS Word is not going to
    work. If Office was deployed via Group Policy there will be no problem (
    assuming that the user or computer account object is still in the OU to
    which the GPO was linked - aka still falls under the scope of management ).
    It is also rather easy to simply 'Service Pack' an application that you have
    deployed via GPO. Say you have Office XP. Well, Service Pack 3 is the
    latest and greatest. All you need to do is to 'update' the Administrative
    Installation Point ( AIP ) and then redeploy the application ( which is as
    simple as clicking on one thing ). You can also update the application to
    the next version. So, say that your people want to standardize on Office
    2003. Simply create another AIP and when you are creating the package just
    tell it that you are 'updating' the Office XP GPO. Office XP will be
    removed and Office 2003 will be deployed. It is that easy. Well, at least
    on paper! I have done it several times.

    HTH,

    Cary


    "Daniel" <Daniel@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:446E424A-551D-4106-A038-3B481A8D7844@microsoft.com...
    > Just a little additional question. I was wondering is it possible to not
    > only automate the windows 2000 workstation installation but also at the
    same
    > time, the installation of MSoffice. Ultimately the ideal goal is to be
    able,
    > from a boot disk???, turn on the new or old computer and have it
    > automatically get wiped clean (if it isn't already) and then proceed to
    > install windows, office and possibly a couple of other routine programs.
    >
    > Thank you once again for your insight!
    >
    > Daniel
    >
    > "Daniel" wrote:
    >
    > > Hello,
    > >
    > > First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most
    detailed
    > > information/instructions possible.
    > >
    > > As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+ computers
    where
    > > they currently have to do individual installation each time they build a
    new
    > > system. I have been asked to try and find out if there is a way to
    automate
    > > the installation of windows so that the installation is unattended and
    that
    > > it can be run on a variety of hardware configurations. Could someone
    please
    > > give me some guidance on this subject?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > >
    > > Daniel
    > >
    > >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 08:53:08 -0700, Daniel wrote:

    > Hello,
    >
    > First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most detailed
    > information/instructions possible.
    >
    > As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+ computers where
    > they currently have to do individual installation each time they build a new
    > system. I have been asked to try and find out if there is a way to automate
    > the installation of windows so that the installation is unattended and that
    > it can be run on a variety of hardware configurations. Could someone please
    > give me some guidance on this subject?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Daniel

    Install windows on a PC. Gather up drivers for all the various machines.
    Use Microsoft Sysprep, in conjunction with Norton Ghost :) Gives you a
    Image that can be loaded on to a variety of machine types with no Blue
    screen o Death :)

    --
    Ken Dennis
    http://KenDennis-RSS.homeip.net
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Daniel wrote:
    > First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most
    > detailed information/instructions possible.
    >
    > As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+
    > computers where they currently have to do individual installation
    > each time they build a new system. I have been asked to try and find
    > out if there is a way to automate the installation of windows so that
    > the installation is unattended and that it can be run on a variety of
    > hardware configurations. Could someone please give me some guidance
    > on this subject?

    http://unattended.msfn.org/
    and/or
    http://unattended.sourceforge.net/
    and/or
    http://www.appdeploy.com/

    Those and some good Google Searches should get you started.

    --
    <- Shenan ->
    --
    The information is provided "as is", it is suggested you research for
    yourself before you take any advice - you are the one ultimately
    responsible for your actions/problems/solutions. Know what you are
    getting into before you jump in with both feet.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Argon Technology sells a product called Client Management Service (CMS) that
    allows you to automate any Windows OS installation. Like, RIS it is
    PXE-based. This means that your client computer must initiate a PXE network
    boot to get things started.

    CMS goes a bit further than RIS by enabling a completely unattended
    installations - no end-user interaction or intervention required. You can
    also schedule deployment to occur after-hours by using the Remote Wake-UP
    ( Wake-On-LAN) that most modern computers support.
    CMS can also be used to deploy Ghost drive images as well. See
    http://www.argontechnology.com/forum/ShowPost.aspx?ThreadId=45


    You can download a free 15-day trial version from
    http://www.argontechnology.com/cms


    "Daniel" <Daniel@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:32B968A6-74F6-4F20-BEE5-FE44C54C17C5@microsoft.com...
    > Hello,
    >
    > First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most
    detailed
    > information/instructions possible.
    >
    > As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+ computers
    where
    > they currently have to do individual installation each time they build a
    new
    > system. I have been asked to try and find out if there is a way to
    automate
    > the installation of windows so that the installation is unattended and
    that
    > it can be run on a variety of hardware configurations. Could someone
    please
    > give me some guidance on this subject?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Daniel
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Cary's post gives you a lot of great information.

    Personally, I went down the bootable CD route. I documented the Windows
    part (www.willowhayes.co.uk/windows2000/custom.doc), but I've got Office
    2000, Outlook 2003, IE6, Acrobat Reader, Citrix ICA client, Flash/Shockwave
    and several industry-specific apps fully automated over two CDs.

    As Cary says, this stuff does take time to do. I don't know how many CDs
    I've got through experimenting. Definitely in the hundreds. At the 50
    workstation level, there's probably some benefit to doing this, but don't
    think you'll be done in an afternoon. In my experience (with around 250
    users at each of three companies), the payback has been immense. Not only
    do you free up time that would have been taken babysitting PCs during setup,
    you ensure that each PC gets set up exactly the same way every time -- not
    the way that whoever set it up felt like diong at the time. It also makes
    the PC build self-descriptive. You can see exactly how the PC was built by
    inspecting the scripts. That's something you can't do with Ghost images.
    Ghost and other disk imaging techniques have their place in larger companies
    as a method of speeding up the deployment, but I still recommend building
    the initial images using a scripted method before cloning.

    You can lift the Windows bit straight from my article, so that should save
    you some work. There are several good resources for scripting the
    applications. Take a look at www.appdeploy.com for more information. For
    more information about doing unattended builds, read the posts over in the
    forums at www.msfn.org, especially those by "Gosh" and others. There's some
    fantastic stuff there.

    For Office 2000 and above, go to the relevant version of the Office Resource
    Kit (www.microsoft.com/office/ork) and download the Custom Installation
    Wizard from the tools section. This allows you to create a transform (MST)
    file that will automate the Office installation.

    I actually wrote that article back when NT4 domains were common and we
    didn't have facilities such as Group Policy. I'd recommend using Group
    Policy over some of the techniques I've documented in that article.

    I also don't particularly like the method of installing applications that I
    hinted at at the end of the document (that is, using GUIRunOnceEx). I still
    use that method, but while it looks very pretty, it's fiddly. Also, when
    deploying Outlook 2003 through a GPO, I found that the Outlook 2003
    installation interrupted the processing of GUIRunOnceEx, which made the
    installation much less unattended that it should be.

    Using "start /wait", as I documented, does work, but managing multiple

    Also, when it comes to joining the machines to the domain, I have a
    recommendation. Create an OU for your managed workstations in Active
    Directory (if you have not already done so). Create a global security group
    and a user. Place the user into the group and then use the delegation of
    control wizard to delgate the ability to create and delete computer accounts
    from that OU. Then, in your unattended build, use the netdom utility to
    join the PC to the domain and place the machine directly into the OU of your
    choice.

    It's definitely worth installing the latest version of Internet Explorer in
    your unattended build, because it's difficult to update later. I believe
    www.appdeploy.com has some information on doing this.

    I'd also recommend using Software Update Services (and WUS when it's
    released) to do patch management, if you are not already doing so. If you
    use a .reg file to modify the registry of machine as they're built, you can
    make a workstation immediately go and get updates when the machine is built.

    Here are the settings I use to do that

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate]
    "WUServer"="http://susserver"
    "WUStatusServer"="http://susserver"

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WindowsUpdate\AU]
    "AUOptions"=dword:00000004
    "NoAutoRebootWithLoggedOnUsers"=dword:00000001
    "NoAutoUpdate"=dword:00000000
    "RescheduleWaitTime"=dword:00000005
    "ScheduledInstallDay"=dword:00000000
    "ScheduledInstallTime"=dword:00000002
    "UseWUServer"=dword:00000001

    While we're talking about registry hacks, here's another couple that I use:

    This gets rid of the Welcome dialogue box.

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer]
    "NoWelcomeScreen"=dword:00000001

    This one adds the computer name to the login window, which is useful to see
    the name of a computer without logging on and also when the computer has
    been locked by a user.

    [HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Winlogon]
    "Welcome"=" | %computername%"

    Hope this helps. Post back with any questions. There are lots of people
    who have been through this before.

    Oli


    "Daniel" <Daniel@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:32B968A6-74F6-4F20-BEE5-FE44C54C17C5@microsoft.com...
    > Hello,
    >
    > First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most
    > detailed
    > information/instructions possible.
    >
    > As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+ computers
    > where
    > they currently have to do individual installation each time they build a
    > new
    > system. I have been asked to try and find out if there is a way to
    > automate
    > the installation of windows so that the installation is unattended and
    > that
    > it can be run on a variety of hardware configurations. Could someone
    > please
    > give me some guidance on this subject?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Daniel
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Hmm. I seem to have stopped part way through a sentence there. What I
    meant to say was:

    "Using "start /wait", as I documented, does work, but managing multiple
    reboots becomes difficult."

    Also, take a look at Patrick J LoPresti's site at
    http://unattended.sourceforge.net/ for an alternative, but still good,
    method. If I were to redo my unattended build, I'd probably choose
    Patrick's method for application installation scripting combined with the
    bootable CD method I already use (or quite possibly RIS).

    Hope this helps and good luck. Let us know how you get on.

    Oli


    "Oli Restorick [MVP]" <oli@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:O1DiHditEHA.3088@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
    > Cary's post gives you a lot of great information.
    >
    > Personally, I went down the bootable CD route. I documented the Windows
    > part (www.willowhayes.co.uk/windows2000/custom.doc), but I've got Office
    > 2000, Outlook 2003, IE6, Acrobat Reader, Citrix ICA client,
    > Flash/Shockwave and several industry-specific apps fully automated over
    > two CDs.
    >
    > As Cary says, this stuff does take time to do. I don't know how many CDs
    > I've got through experimenting. Definitely in the hundreds. At the 50
    > workstation level, there's probably some benefit to doing this, but don't
    > think you'll be done in an afternoon. In my experience (with around 250
    > users at each of three companies), the payback has been immense. Not only
    > do you free up time that would have been taken babysitting PCs during
    > setup, you ensure that each PC gets set up exactly the same way every
    > time -- not the way that whoever set it up felt like diong at the time.
    > It also makes the PC build self-descriptive. You can see exactly how the
    > PC was built by inspecting the scripts. That's something you can't do
    > with Ghost images. Ghost and other disk imaging techniques have their
    > place in larger companies as a method of speeding up the deployment, but I
    > still recommend building the initial images using a scripted method before
    > cloning.
    >
    > You can lift the Windows bit straight from my article, so that should save
    > you some work. There are several good resources for scripting the
    > applications. Take a look at www.appdeploy.com for more information. For
    > more information about doing unattended builds, read the posts over in the
    > forums at www.msfn.org, especially those by "Gosh" and others. There's
    > some fantastic stuff there.
    >
    > For Office 2000 and above, go to the relevant version of the Office
    > Resource Kit (www.microsoft.com/office/ork) and download the Custom
    > Installation Wizard from the tools section. This allows you to create a
    > transform (MST) file that will automate the Office installation.
    >

    <snip>
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    And, as if by magic, Microsoft's home page has a huge link to business
    desktop deployment.

    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/desktopdeployment/default.mspx

    It's geared towards Windows XP and Office 2003 (but you have to be moving in
    that direction, right?) A lot of what's shown there applies to some extent
    or other to Windows 2000 and Office 2000/XP.

    Oli


    "Daniel" <Daniel@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:32B968A6-74F6-4F20-BEE5-FE44C54C17C5@microsoft.com...
    > Hello,
    >
    > First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most
    > detailed
    > information/instructions possible.
    >
    > As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+ computers
    > where
    > they currently have to do individual installation each time they build a
    > new
    > system. I have been asked to try and find out if there is a way to
    > automate
    > the installation of windows so that the installation is unattended and
    > that
    > it can be run on a variety of hardware configurations. Could someone
    > please
    > give me some guidance on this subject?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Daniel
    >
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    On your XP CD.... \SUPPORT\TOOLS\DEPLOY.CAB

    You will find all you need !

    Hugo

    "Daniel" <Daniel@discussions.microsoft.com> a écrit dans le message de
    news:32B968A6-74F6-4F20-BEE5-FE44C54C17C5@microsoft.com...
    > Hello,
    >
    > First off, I'm new to this field, so please try to give me the most
    detailed
    > information/instructions possible.
    >
    > As for my question, I'm working in a medium size company 50+ computers
    where
    > they currently have to do individual installation each time they build a
    new
    > system. I have been asked to try and find out if there is a way to
    automate
    > the installation of windows so that the installation is unattended and
    that
    > it can be run on a variety of hardware configurations. Could someone
    please
    > give me some guidance on this subject?
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Daniel
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    On Tue, 19 Oct 2004 17:05:25 -0400, Ken Dennis wrote:

    > Gather up drivers for all the various machines.

    Could you expand on this step?

    --

    But let me tell you, the slim lazy Homer you knew is dead. Now I'm a
    big fat dynamo.

    -- Homer Simpson
    King-Size Homer
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Geoffrey King wrote:

    >>Gather up drivers for all the various machines.

    > Could you expand on this step?

    Windows only gives you limited driver support. You either have to embed
    your 3rd party drivers during the build, or waste hours installing them
    after windows has finished.

    It's far from straightforward; you can't just use "setup.exe" from a
    dumb CD, you have to extract the INF files and make damn sure they're
    the right ones. Some of the big players like Intel have good
    documentation on this, others such as Dell have ZERO documentation.
    Sometimes you have to do a PCI scan and then match the INF files to the
    vendor IDs. Once you did that you can put them in $oem$ and set your
    unattend file accordingly.

    --
    Gerry Hickman (London UK)
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 20:23:28 +0100, Gerry Hickman wrote:

    > Geoffrey King wrote:
    >
    >>>Gather up drivers for all the various machines.
    >
    >> Could you expand on this step?
    >
    > Windows only gives you limited driver support. You either have to embed
    > your 3rd party drivers during the build, or waste hours installing them
    > after windows has finished.

    Thanks for covering that one Gerry. In addition there are some tools you
    can use to extract setup files, but as Gerry said, it's a pain in the
    butt. Out organization only has about 5 types of computers deployed on
    our site at any given time, so when we kick out the lowest speed, then add
    one new speed, we don't have much work to do. But the first built was
    slow any painful.


    --
    Ken Dennis
    http://KenDennis-RSS.homeip.net
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    One trick that works surprisingly often is to drag a setup.exe onto a Winzip
    window. Depending on the format of the file, quite often Winzip will get
    the files for you. From there, just look for the directory containing the
    ..inf, .sys and .cat files for the driver.

    Another possible method is to double-click the setup file and wait for it to
    extract the files for a temp directory without clicking through any
    dialogues. Then go and find the temp directory and copy the files out.

    Cheers

    Oli


    "Ken Dennis" <k-dennis@excite.com> wrote in message
    news:pan.2004.10.20.22.02.46.200306@excite.com...
    > On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 20:23:28 +0100, Gerry Hickman wrote:
    >
    >> Geoffrey King wrote:
    >>
    >>>>Gather up drivers for all the various machines.
    >>
    >>> Could you expand on this step?
    >>
    >> Windows only gives you limited driver support. You either have to embed
    >> your 3rd party drivers during the build, or waste hours installing them
    >> after windows has finished.
    >
    > Thanks for covering that one Gerry. In addition there are some tools you
    > can use to extract setup files, but as Gerry said, it's a pain in the
    > butt. Out organization only has about 5 types of computers deployed on
    > our site at any given time, so when we kick out the lowest speed, then add
    > one new speed, we don't have much work to do. But the first built was
    > slow any painful.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Ken Dennis
    > http://KenDennis-RSS.homeip.net
    >
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 23:22:45 +0100, Oli Restorick [MVP] wrote:

    > One trick that works surprisingly often is to drag a setup.exe onto a Winzip
    > window. Depending on the format of the file, quite often Winzip will get
    > the files for you. From there, just look for the directory containing the
    > .inf, .sys and .cat files for the driver.

    WinRAR also tend's to open a few more formats than winzip also. I think
    the AI builder comes with some utilities also, available with the norton
    package.

    Cheers.

    --
    Ken Dennis
    http://KenDennis-RSS.homeip.net
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.setup_deployment (More info?)

    Hi,

    I also find WinZip solves most of these problems, but I find
    InstallShield files hard to extract "data1.cab" and all that.

    One of the more tricky aspects, is when you are making a build that can
    be used on multiple machines where the hardware on newer machines is an
    updated version of that which is on older machines. Sometimes you have
    to leave the old driver, but sometimes you can supersede it with the
    newer one. The only way I know of doing this, is manually parsing
    strings in the the INF files to see what supersedes what.

    Ken Dennis wrote:

    > On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 23:22:45 +0100, Oli Restorick [MVP] wrote:
    >
    >
    >>One trick that works surprisingly often is to drag a setup.exe onto a Winzip
    >>window. Depending on the format of the file, quite often Winzip will get
    >>the files for you. From there, just look for the directory containing the
    >>.inf, .sys and .cat files for the driver.
    >
    >
    > WinRAR also tend's to open a few more formats than winzip also. I think
    > the AI builder comes with some utilities also, available with the norton
    > package.
    >
    > Cheers.
    >


    --
    Gerry Hickman (London UK)
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