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when will hdtv be common place

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Anonymous
September 17, 2004 6:48:42 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

the new tvs at retail stores are HD's but when do you think it will be the norm
(or at least say 1/3) of the channels to be in HD

More about : hdtv common place

Anonymous
September 17, 2004 12:51:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

It's a gradual shift that is really driven by two factors: 1.
Available HD content and 2. Number of households with HD or HD ready
sets. Those two factors really depend upon one another and the later
is driven by price of HD sets. What we've seen in the US over the last
two years is a huge increase in available content from local networks.
As of last year (season) all the major networks were offering at least
one or two programs in HD. Most of the new shows this season are in
available in HD, so the trend is now set and that will continue to
drive available local content.

As others have pointed out in the NG, over-the-air networks have
really become dependant upon subscription based providers (cable,
satellite). This is where the HD bottle neck is right now. There are a
few problems with delivering subscription HD, there's infrastructure
limitations (bandwidth), rather expensive equipment that has to be
invested in and the subscription service providers are looking at the
interest of their subscriber base (is it worth their while to invest
in all this).

Since they aren't regulated by the FCC in the same way that network
television is, subscription providers aren't mandated to switch to
DTV, that puts them in a situation where they have to decide when the
time is right. They all provide some level of HD content at this
point, but today it's usually less than 5% of their channel offerings.
To really free up bandwidth and make the majority of their channels
available in HD they need better technology and that means a
transition away from MPEG-2 on to something such as WM9 or some other
competing format, if you aren't familiar with compression codecs:
MPEG-2, WM9, etc.. these are the software algorithms that decompress
the digital video/audio feed. What's happening is this technology is
software based and it's driven by processing power. So the HD sit-top
boxes Comcast Cable can buy today could be a very poor investment,
because a year or two from now processing power will likely double
making new compression codecs possible that can squeeze HD tighter and
fit even more channels in. That leaves open space for a company such
as Motorola or Scientific Atlanta to step in and lease the equipment
to the cable companies. They could design their boxes to be upgradable
to some degree and plan for this sort of thing, but that has yet to
happen. Also cable companies are interested in offering new services,
but HD is only one of those services. DVR (Digital Video Recorder) has
a larger customer appeal at the moment, so investment is going into
DVR equipment. Some companies (e.g. TimeWarner Cable) are investing in
HD capable DVR equipment now, and they are leaders for the time being,
but they are taking a risk by doing so. In regard to content offering
I think it's safe to say cable companies are going to stay in the
experimental stage with HD for a bit longer.

At some point, one of the providers will take a risk and begin
delivering the majority of their content in HD using the best of
what's available at that time. Once that happens, the pressure will be
on to compete and other companies will follow. To drive that sort of
risk more households must have HDTVs and that's happening now! HDTV
sales are continuing to rise and you can see that in the news. When
investors are looking at tech companies such as Hitachi and Sony and
basing forecast around their HDTV product offerings and consumer
embrace of those products you know there's something going on. This
has been happening over the last two years.

So to finally get around to a answer to your question. I think we're
four to six years years away from the majority of content being
available in HD.
Anonymous
September 17, 2004 4:14:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

SamNC001 wrote:
>
> the new tvs at retail stores are HD's but when do you think it will be the norm
> (or at least say 1/3) of the channels to be in HD


Sam:

It depends where you live....

In GBay, WI....

Time Warner Cable has 6 full time Cable HD Programming Chans
and another 6 part time HD Programming....
This part time is a lot of Weekend HD Sports...
like NASCAR on TNT-HD & ABC-HD NFL... etc.

On top of that, 6 of the 7 major TV Networks here transmit
HD Program signals thru out the week...
As Programming is not 100% HD 16:9 yet, there are enough
HD items here that are not on Cable....

IF you have the HD channels in your area, & have $1500
for a Good HDTV set... go for it...

Try http://www.antennaweb.org & enter your ZIP Code
and Select Digital Channels for OTA (Over the
air antenna) for possible DTV/HD stations.

OR Try http://www.hdtvpub.com & enter your ZIP Code
for additional comments on HD availability in your ZIP area.

evening & Weekend HD Live programs
Related resources
Anonymous
September 17, 2004 6:53:23 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Right now, everything I want to watch on HBO is in HD. It looks as though
most of the football games I will want to watch will be in HD. And of the 3
or 4 prime-time shows that I watch that are premiering on the networks over
the next week or two, all but 1 will be in HD.

What is not HD are the cable news and financial shows through which I often
surf. Still, given how much is in HD now and the stunning quality of it, I
see no reason to wait. The only downside is having to put up with a
somewhat poorer SD image on your HDTV set than what you probably got on your
old SD set. But my experience has been that that got less noticeable and
less problematic over time.

So, why wait?

mack
austin


"SamNC001" <samnc001@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040916224842.22172.00000703@mb-m18.aol.com...
> the new tvs at retail stores are HD's but when do you think it will be the
norm
> (or at least say 1/3) of the channels to be in HD
Anonymous
September 17, 2004 8:00:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"JDeats" <jeremy@pdq.net> wrote in message
news:b0738dc6.0409170751.5fcef96e@posting.google.com...
> It's a gradual shift that is really driven by two factors: 1.
> Available HD content and 2. Number of households with HD or HD ready
> sets. Those two factors really depend upon one another and the later
> is driven by price of HD sets.

I would not be surprised to see a large number of home sets sold during this
football season, culminating right before the NFL playoffs. Football is
really a "killer app" for HDTV. Once a TV-football fan sees a game in HD,
he is never going to be satisfied watching one in SD again.

Other sports are great in HD too, no question about it, but with football,
you have many long shots of the field and most of the 22 guys, all
irritatingly-blurry in SD.

mack
austin
Anonymous
September 17, 2004 10:22:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Here in Austin, Time-Warner offers these HD channels:

HBO
Showtime
iN Demand HD1
iN Demand HD2
HDNet
NDNet Movies
8 or so local network affilliate HD channels (but not all in operation)
Discovery HD Theater
Fox Sports HD
TNT HD
ESPN HD

The local affilliate HD channels come with the digital cable subscription.
HBO or Showtime HD come with subscriptions to those channels. The iNDemand
and HDNet channels plus ESPNHD come extra, as an HDTV tier @ $9.95/month.

mack
austin




"Dennis Mayer" <Polaris1@execpc.com> wrote in message
news:414B1B62.82B20853@execpc.com...
>
>
> SamNC001 wrote:
> >
> > the new tvs at retail stores are HD's but when do you think it will be
the norm
> > (or at least say 1/3) of the channels to be in HD
>
>
> Sam:
>
> It depends where you live....
>
> In GBay, WI....
>
> Time Warner Cable has 6 full time Cable HD Programming Chans
> and another 6 part time HD Programming....
> This part time is a lot of Weekend HD Sports...
> like NASCAR on TNT-HD & ABC-HD NFL... etc.
>
> On top of that, 6 of the 7 major TV Networks here transmit
> HD Program signals thru out the week...
> As Programming is not 100% HD 16:9 yet, there are enough
> HD items here that are not on Cable....
>
> IF you have the HD channels in your area, & have $1500
> for a Good HDTV set... go for it...
>
> Try http://www.antennaweb.org & enter your ZIP Code
> and Select Digital Channels for OTA (Over the
> air antenna) for possible DTV/HD stations.
>
> OR Try http://www.hdtvpub.com & enter your ZIP Code
> for additional comments on HD availability in your ZIP area.
>
> evening & Weekend HD Live programs
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 7:46:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote in
message news:xXF2d.74$1d6.72@fe1.texas.rr.com...
> Here in Austin, Time-Warner offers these HD channels:
>
> HBO

At least $10 per month extra

> Showtime

At least $10 per month extra

> iN Demand HD1

Pay per view

> iN Demand HD2

Pay per view

> HDNet
> NDNet Movies
> 8 or so local network affilliate HD channels (but not all in operation)
> Discovery HD Theater
> Fox Sports HD
> TNT HD
> ESPN HD
>
> The local affilliate HD channels come with the digital cable subscription.
> HBO or Showtime HD come with subscriptions to those channels. The
> iNDemand
> and HDNet channels plus ESPNHD come extra, as an HDTV tier @ $9.95/month.

So to get all of these, you must: (1) subscribe to the digital cable tier
(or digital satellite with local channels); (2) pay $10 extra per month for
HD; (3) pay $10 extra per month for HBO; (4) pay $10 extra per month for
Showtime; and (5) pay $3 a pop or whatever for movies on In Demand (or much
more, up to $25 or so, for special events most likely). Which is all fine if
you REALLY feel like spending $80+ per month (or $960 per year) on TV
programming even before you start ordering pay per view programs...

Meanwhile, 95% of the rest of the cable/satellite channels out there are
still not HD.
Anonymous
September 20, 2004 8:25:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

You have vastly exaggerated the amount of extra money one has to spend for
HDTV, at least here in Austin.

We have subscribed to HBO for many years @ $10/month. HBOHD comes with
that. So, no additional charge there. We don't subscribe to Showtime.

We don't buy ppv events and have only bought InDemand movies once or twice,
generally preferring to rent DVD's from Blockbuster.

We already had a digital cable box for which we paid $7.95/month. We just
exchanged it for an HDTV box for the same price.

We did subscribe to the optional HDTV "tier" that includes several HDTV
channels + ESPNHD. The latter is the main reason we wanted it, for the
ESPNHD football games. But network HDTV broadcasts via our local channels
come via digital cable channels for which one does not have to pay extra.

So, for an HDTV digital box, HBOHD and the "HDTV tier" of channels, we pay
$10 a month more than we were paying before we bought our HDTV set.

If $10 extra a month is a problem, then buying a $3-thousand dollar TV set
is out of the question anyway -- or should be.

mack
austin

"Matthew Vaughan" <matt-no-spam-109@NOSPAM.hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Kos3d.14365$54.212036@typhoon.sonic.net...
> "Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote in
> message news:xXF2d.74$1d6.72@fe1.texas.rr.com...
> > Here in Austin, Time-Warner offers these HD channels:
> >
> > HBO
>
> At least $10 per month extra
>
> > Showtime
>
> At least $10 per month extra
>
> > iN Demand HD1
>
> Pay per view
>
> > iN Demand HD2
>
> Pay per view
>
> > HDNet
> > NDNet Movies
> > 8 or so local network affilliate HD channels (but not all in operation)
> > Discovery HD Theater
> > Fox Sports HD
> > TNT HD
> > ESPN HD
> >
> > The local affilliate HD channels come with the digital cable
subscription.
> > HBO or Showtime HD come with subscriptions to those channels. The
> > iNDemand
> > and HDNet channels plus ESPNHD come extra, as an HDTV tier @
$9.95/month.
>
> So to get all of these, you must: (1) subscribe to the digital cable tier
> (or digital satellite with local channels); (2) pay $10 extra per month
for
> HD; (3) pay $10 extra per month for HBO; (4) pay $10 extra per month for
> Showtime; and (5) pay $3 a pop or whatever for movies on In Demand (or
much
> more, up to $25 or so, for special events most likely). Which is all fine
if
> you REALLY feel like spending $80+ per month (or $960 per year) on TV
> programming even before you start ordering pay per view programs...
>
> Meanwhile, 95% of the rest of the cable/satellite channels out there are
> still not HD.
>
>
Anonymous
September 21, 2004 8:51:59 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Matthew Vaughan" <matt-no-spam-109@NOSPAM.hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:Kos3d.14365$54.212036@typhoon.sonic.net...
> "Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote in
> message news:xXF2d.74$1d6.72@fe1.texas.rr.com...
>> Here in Austin, Time-Warner offers these HD channels:
>>
>> HBO
>
> At least $10 per month extra

no - included with Comcast-digital HD service $19.99/month

>> Showtime
>
> At least $10 per month extra

no -included

>> iN Demand HD1
>
> Pay per view

no - not PPV and it's included

>> iN Demand HD2
>
> Pay per view

no - not PPV and it's included
Anonymous
September 23, 2004 4:10:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"SamNC001" <samnc001@aol.com> wrote in message
news:20040916224842.22172.00000703@mb-m18.aol.com...
: the new tvs at retail stores are HD's but when do you think it will be
the norm
: (or at least say 1/3) of the channels to be in HD

=================
How about NOW!
over half the OTA stations in Seattle have HD.
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 4:14:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

We are quite a long way off from HD becoming the norm over non-HD
content. There are millons of HD able sets out there but most of the
content is still being sent out in non-HD format.
I see how people say they get like a dozen channels of HD, but even then
on some of them it is not all HD.
It will continue at the slow but steady rate that it is currently taking
place.


"Matthew Vaughan" <matt-no-spam-109@NOSPAM.hotmail.com> wrote in
news:Kos3d.14365$54.212036@typhoon.sonic.net:

> "Mack McKinnon" <MckinnonRemoveThis@tvadmanDeleteThisAsWell.com> wrote
> in message news:xXF2d.74$1d6.72@fe1.texas.rr.com...
>> Here in Austin, Time-Warner offers these HD channels:
>>
>> HBO
>
> At least $10 per month extra
>
>> Showtime
>
> At least $10 per month extra
>
>> iN Demand HD1
>
> Pay per view
>
>> iN Demand HD2
>
> Pay per view
>
>> HDNet
>> NDNet Movies
>> 8 or so local network affilliate HD channels (but not all in
>> operation) Discovery HD Theater
>> Fox Sports HD
>> TNT HD
>> ESPN HD
>>
>> The local affilliate HD channels come with the digital cable
>> subscription. HBO or Showtime HD come with subscriptions to those
>> channels. The iNDemand
>> and HDNet channels plus ESPNHD come extra, as an HDTV tier @
>> $9.95/month.
>
> So to get all of these, you must: (1) subscribe to the digital cable
> tier (or digital satellite with local channels); (2) pay $10 extra per
> month for HD; (3) pay $10 extra per month for HBO; (4) pay $10 extra
> per month for Showtime; and (5) pay $3 a pop or whatever for movies on
> In Demand (or much more, up to $25 or so, for special events most
> likely). Which is all fine if you REALLY feel like spending $80+ per
> month (or $960 per year) on TV programming even before you start
> ordering pay per view programs...
>
> Meanwhile, 95% of the rest of the cable/satellite channels out there
> are still not HD.
>
>
!