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So what is your job?

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March 15, 2007 9:05:42 PM

As you all know Tom's Hardware is the very center of news and entertainment for most computer technicians and engineers as well as alot of other electronic careers. Im 17 still cant think what i want to do for a career, except computers and business is what im thinking about. Im the best in my class in entrepreneurship and all of my computer classes. Now what i was hoping is yall will do is post what you all do how many years of college, how many years on the job, a job description, and if your brave enough how much you make per hour or year (salary).

This CAN be a interesting topic that CAN potentially forever change someones future career.

PS: yes its in wrong place cant find a good visited spot for it.
PSS: IF WHAT YOU POST WILL BE NEGATIVE DONT POST!

More about : job

March 15, 2007 9:16:57 PM

I've just turned 18, and am staying an extra year in high school to complete Calculus and some Repeat Courses to get me into Co-op Program for Computer Engineering, So Computer Engineering is my opinion(being in your age bracket)
March 15, 2007 9:19:40 PM

Ya im thinking about that. I so dont wanna take calculus just the sound of it scares me.
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March 15, 2007 9:20:12 PM

I'm a writer. Scripts and such....
March 15, 2007 9:25:29 PM

auto-tech for 20 years.
March 15, 2007 9:31:59 PM

Mortgage Manager 30+ years

Gamer since the original pong
March 15, 2007 9:37:18 PM

Sadly, I only completed 2 years of college. Was leaning toward becoming an engineer. Anyway, I ran out of money and had to go to work. For the last 4 years I have been doing CAD/CAM stuff as a wire EDM operator. I make punch and die sets which are used for stamping rotor/stator laminations. Pay is only about 35k a year, but I enjoy it and its only 5 minutes from home.
March 15, 2007 9:42:49 PM

I am a computer engineer working for Intel (design and design validation). I have a BS in Computer Science. Intel is an exciting company to work for, and I enjoy reading the TG Forumz daily. Although, I have to say, when I hang out with my AMD friends, we are much more civil and dispassionate than some people here. ;) 

And my remarks never, in any way, reflect the views of my employer.
March 15, 2007 9:46:28 PM

Quote:
I am a computer engineer working for Intel (design and design validation). I have a BS in Computer Science. Intel is an exciting company to work for, and I enjoy reading the TG Forumz daily. Although, I have to say, when I hang out with my AMD friends, we are much more civil and dispassionate than some people here. ;) 

And my remarks never, in any way, reflect the views of my employer.


Is there any way you can give us more info on that via post or PM?
2 years ago i thought i wanted to work there but i had a feeling it would be extremely stressful and bad pay ($50k or below). Any more info on what its
like there? and where is it located?
Im sure working there is the same as AMD.
March 15, 2007 9:46:51 PM

Going on 3 years in my current "IT Manager" position, aroun 120 person office at a 30,000 person civil engineering company. BS in ICS.... not that it did me much good to be honest, the programming end didn't end up beign what I wanted to do. 3rd position doing some sort of IT work, started off as a mortgage company in school doing refis and low-end (and I mean low) helpdesk as needed since the local IT guy didn't do much....

Gaming enthusiast ;)  Usually make an ass of myself on the boards here, I'm sure.
March 15, 2007 9:47:16 PM

Half way through a Comp Sci degree. I wanna be a doctor some day...
March 15, 2007 9:48:19 PM

IT Consultant/Network Technician

2 Years of college (AAS degree)

Just under 1 year on the job

Mostly I fix other companies networks and try to keep the computers around here running smoothly, most of my time is spent re-installing OS's and figuring out weird problems that customers have. I'm also the most junior tech here so I get to do the bitch work (like crawling around in the ceiling whenever someone wants to put a person where there isn't a network jack).

$24k a year (and I'm due for a raise)
March 15, 2007 9:51:37 PM

From what ive learned, there is no money in this field and so much college. Quite interesting though.
March 15, 2007 9:52:21 PM

I will do my best to answer specific questions, but your best bet is to look at the Intel webiste http://www.intel.com/jobs/index.htm.

I'd rather not go into pay, but I will say that it is industry competitive.
March 15, 2007 9:56:14 PM

Student, software engineering at Waterloo. Good program, but a lot of work.
March 15, 2007 10:01:10 PM

I've got 2 - 3 Friends in Waterloo. One is in first year Computer Science and another in Masters for Software Engineering, Not sure if he just Graduated or this is his last year?
March 15, 2007 10:01:49 PM

Didnt finish University, although did a year and half or Computer Science.

Been a developer/programmer/dba/system builder for 15 years.

I don't personnally recommend the programming end of things, if you have the choice to go into the engineering aspect of the industry. That's where I reckon the real buzz is.

Like the above, if I had been given a crystal ball when I was 16 I would now definitely be doing microcode for AMD.

And gamer since birth :twisted:
March 15, 2007 10:05:00 PM

Engineering seems to be the resounding Recommendation, and like the poster below The Software side is being shunned because it's just very difficult and very annoying field.
March 15, 2007 10:10:18 PM

Exactly.

Software development is changing quite quickly these days.

The idea of a lone maverick coding into the early hours is very rare indeed. These days as a coder you are more likely to find yourself in a very large team, with extensive and intrusive project and change management dictating your every step.

Especially now that multi-threading is coming to the fore.

All is not bad however. There is a lot of satisfaction from coding, and just staying on the learning curve can be rewarding.
March 15, 2007 10:18:56 PM

Quote:
Had I forseen how keenly interested in technology i would have become;i would have persued an education along the lines of becoming an engineer for AMD.
I am not a programmer type mentality,I only know what dos etc i need to know.As far as software goes i am learning about network security from reading.As far as work goes i have settled for brainless jobs for the most part.Only recently have i discovered a keen interest in more technical persuits.

I have been building and maintaining pc's for 4 years or better.I would rather be an engineer :wink:


verndewd...I found myself in a similar position many years ago....and all I can say is go for it. In my experience when people pursue employment in areas they are passionate about they invariably find success. It may not happen as fast as you would like, but if you don't give up, and you aren't a moron(clearly you are not) you'll get there.


hognose
March 15, 2007 10:20:46 PM

Comcast Technical Operations, 2 years of College, Associates in Computer Science. Not enough a year. Under 40k
March 15, 2007 10:23:28 PM

Comp Sci Major at Iowa State Univ.

Coming through my second semester here and I'm really enjoying it. 50K a year isn't bad pay especially for entry level salary, but that's my opinion.
March 15, 2007 10:26:03 PM

hmm.... the long name for my job is "Computer, Network, Switching and Cryptographic Systems".

I currently work on telephone switches, Cisco family of hardware, multiplexers, crypto, ATM switches, fiber optics, and occasionally some other stuff. All in a mobile set-up.

I have a AAS in Electronics Technology? ( I can never remember what it says) and am working towards a BS in computers as well as my CCNA cert.

Currently my base salary is ~3500 a month, full medical and dental, and the chance to make more depending on where I'm living

9 Years military and counting.

Oh and on the really bad days I call a buddy of mine in EOD and go blow something up :twisted: :p  :twisted:
March 15, 2007 10:28:05 PM

"computers and business is what im thinking about. Im the best in my class in entrepreneurship and all of my computer classes."

bachelors degree in finance and economics, farmer on three continents, and I import-export agricultural commodities on my own account (no, not dope or drugs). I use computers to develop and maintain a list of contacts, research and spot trends, and buy and sell something about which I know.
Have you been watching the price of corn lately? ALL commodities are going up fast and, generally, through the economic law of substitution, it will affect all of our lives greatly in just the near future.
These are incredibly exciting times filled with opportunity, but you need to think outside the box.
Buy low, sell high.
March 15, 2007 10:29:46 PM

I'm 19, and I'm the IT Support/Network Administrator/Technological Co-ordinator at a Agriservice company here in Australia.

I finished school, did 18 months tafe, couldn't get a start in the IT industry, so I took a gamble and started running my own IT consulting business. I picked up work pretty quick and enjoyed the good money ($1600 a week is good... :D ) But it was a bit patchy at times and I eventually started consulting for the company I work for now, who took me on full time with a salary (Back to $600 a week now... But at least I get all the bonuses :D ) and have been working here for nearly a year :) 

For those who are leaving school. Even if your marks are not the best, just show an employer that your keen and your willing to learn and you'll most likely get your foot in the door. I scored my job despite haven't the least experience because I was keen and I was happy to admit when I didn't know something and would find out what I needed to know. I was one of those guys who just passed all his IT courses at school, because Alcohol, Girls and Combat Robots were more exciting then reading text books all weekend :roll: :oops: 
March 15, 2007 10:33:55 PM

Quote:
I am a computer engineer working for Intel (design and design validation). I have a BS in Computer Science. Intel is an exciting company to work for, and I enjoy reading the TG Forumz daily. Although, I have to say, when I hang out with my AMD friends, we are much more civil and dispassionate than some people here. ;) 

And my remarks never, in any way, reflect the views of my employer.


Was your Comp sci degree about absolute crap, or did you actually learn about the science behind technologies.

I do loads of crap like project management and developing information systems. :( 

That is not science!! Thats business / management to me.

I chose computer science because i thought it would be the science behind computing....apparently science isn't what i thought it was.

Anyway me, I'm a CS student, I'm a freelance software writer. I also dissasemble a lot of things and am interested in the challenges that people write into their software :) 

Quote:
Engineering seems to be the resounding Recommendation, and like the poster below The Software side is being shunned because it's just very difficult and very annoying field.


I agree. Computer Science was the degree i knew as the best, but the engineering ones are much more hands on. They have become what i imagined computer science to be. If the industry catches on to what a load of rubbish these CS degrees have turned into, i feel the boredom i'm induring might have been a waste of time.

The people on the engineering courses learn a lot more and do a lot more hands on. We do crappy theory.
March 15, 2007 10:34:42 PM

4th year Computer Science student. Can't freaking wait to graduate, though I have to wait until the fall.

After sophmore year I co-oped at Intel for nine months. Last summer I had another co-op, and this summer I have a third. The last two were in the chipset group developing tools and models for design validation. This next time I'm working in the Graphics Engineering group on the graphics performance models.

There's nothing wrong with coding software, in fact, that's a valuable skill to have. Any computer engineering job worth a damn can make use of good programming skills. If you do any design or validation work, you will most definitely need good programming skills. Most people suck at programming. That's just the way it is.

Just as important though is learning to work with people. The easy part is writing up the code for a project. The hard part is everything else.

Before I started working at Intel, I was pretty worried that the working environment would suck. Turns out it's the exact opposite. I have more fun out there than I do in college. I'm just crawling out of my skin waiting to go back.
March 15, 2007 10:39:40 PM

Quote:

Was your Comp sci degree about absolute crap, or did you actually learn about the science behind technologies.

I do loads of crap like project management and developing information systems. :( 


I've pretty much been alternating between co-ops/internships and going to school and definitely recommend it if you get a chance.

Every time I go from internship->school or school->internship I learn a lot more than I would have otherwise. It also helps keep me motivated in class because I have a better idea of how class relates to the real world.

Take classes that interest you, and make sure to look out for internship opportunities.

I'm also taking a project management class. If you want to be a successful engineer, you'll need to work well in groups. Everything that produces a deliverable is a project. If you're a good engineer, you'll end up being a project manager to some degree.
March 15, 2007 10:53:27 PM

Software engineering student at Concordia. Lots of discrete Math involved.
March 15, 2007 10:54:30 PM

IT Manager with Intel. I started off in the fabs and gradually found I had an interest in application development, shifted my focus in the company, did well, and eventually moved into management(which I never planned, but can be very rewarding). However, I still work hard to make sure I get my coding fix....

Like Phanboy I am also friends with someone at AMD...and continue to be amused at the level of hatred people outside the two companies think the companies have for each other...

legal disclaimer...yada yada...my opinions are mine alone and do not reflect the opinion of any other entity...yada yada..insert more legalese here...;-)

hognose
March 15, 2007 10:57:07 PM

I'm in the same situation, just a couple more months of high school

I am really interested in computer engineering, Can anyone here tell me what exactly it involves? As in what is taught in class? projects, etc?

If an answer is "advanced calculus" then my mind will change very quickly

I have 2 years of AP programming behind me (second year was hell for me so I'm not going back to that), computer maintanence and LAN management (networking or computer animation are my back up plans)
March 15, 2007 11:09:16 PM

I work in Desktop Support (Level 2) for a large company.
March 15, 2007 11:11:39 PM

I do internet and phone tech support for a major cable provider in the US
went to college for 1 year for chem engineering, but organic chemistry killed me. I've been working here for about 9 months.
I make right around $30k a year, the job is easy as can be, and there is a good career path.
March 15, 2007 11:21:01 PM

Quote:

Was your Comp sci degree about absolute crap, or did you actually learn about the science behind technologies.

I do loads of crap like project management and developing information systems. :( 


I've pretty much been alternating between co-ops/internships and going to school and definitely recommend it if you get a chance.

Every time I go from internship->school or school->internship I learn a lot more than I would have otherwise. It also helps keep me motivated in class because I have a better idea of how class relates to the real world.

Take classes that interest you, and make sure to look out for internship opportunities.

I'm also taking a project management class. If you want to be a successful engineer, you'll need to work well in groups. Everything that produces a deliverable is a project. If you're a good engineer, you'll end up being a project manager to some degree.

Where are you from? I get to do a gap year next year, not doing it though. Just going to get the degree done. Might get some summer work. I've taught myself everything i know.
I see your point, but the course is one extreme to another.
If we could float from internships more often it woudl work better, but one solid year out hardly seems worth it. I can do that year out once i have my degree. The degree is not hard, i'm just dissapointed. I thought i was going to learn science behind computing.

In the first year they teach basic java and at the same time they are teaching about the kernel of an O/S. Luckily i knew a lot about O/S's but if i didn't know crap about programming, how the hell would i understand what a system call is and how an operating works??
It's like teaching someone how to drive a car and expecting them to become a car mechanic at the same time.
March 15, 2007 11:23:45 PM

self taught graphic designer...video editor/3d effects. Just started my own business , some days I earn a couple a hundred.
Friend a mine- graphic designer here in the UK charges £50($100 ?) an hour, he is self taught too, oh yeah n we both work from home. MOst of what i do is visuals for night clubs... I used to be a club manager 15 years ago , .am still friends with the old gang ,so all this works out fine for me-having good contacts saves me from looking for jobs , n being an introvert I hate that.

School was rubbish , ive never used anything they taught me.I learn more watching a history/war film . They couldnt teach me French even, yet I learned Swedish in no time by living there a while. I tried collage , but hated it , I get distracted around people . I like to work alone in me' own space.

I hate authority and bad managers on power trips , I prefer to work for people I know and build some kind of relationship with them ..sometimes.
Sure Im strange , but I go with instead of fighting it , for the past 14 years or so, Ive worked hard n saved for a year or so , then kind aburnt out , so I go spend 6-12 months inThailand or somewhere cheap...where i dont have to work. I love that, not working , when there I work on my health n sports , listen to music , yoga or something. Working with computers now .I am the most unhealthy ive ever been , couldnt do this forever.

edit::/// oh be careful with RSI -repetetive strain injury if you gonna do a computer/desk job- it can hurt you real bad for a long time .

good luck.
smudgee :D 
March 15, 2007 11:23:45 PM

basic computer technician for 20 years, BA History, worked for myself, and worked for others, you always make about the same, If I could do it again, engineering is the way to go.....so far experience has been worth more than education, but thats probably changing
March 15, 2007 11:28:07 PM

2nd year out of college, Electrical Engineer. I work for a company that does a lot of military contracts, focusing in Power Electronics and high power devices. e.g. Large electric motors that turn the screws of Destroyers, Rail Guns for amphibious bombardment from Navy Ships, Magnetic Levitation for trains, EMALS (Electromagnetic Aircraft Launch System) for Aircraft Carriers, Fusion reactors, We do a bunch of stuff. But EE's can do a ton of different things, including a lot of whats done at the processor level in computers. EE's do microelectronics (cell phones, computer power supplies, all the stuff at the sharper image), Power systems (like your local power company), Power Electronics (like what I do), there is a very wide field, which is true for every type of Engineering. Pay starts for most Engineers at 50-55k, thats pretty standard for EE's around the country, provided you find yourself a decent job. Some I know started higher, some I know started lower, but 50 is a pretty good start.

Well to be honest with you, if you don't want to do any calculus, say goodbye to almost every technical degree from a 4 year university. That doesn't mean that you'll be using calculus in your job. Quite the opposite, you have simulators to do that most of the time, but you must understand what the simulator does, and how it works. I crack open my books from college probably once a month to look up an equation, but most of the time its the concepts that I use, not the math.

I like my job a lot, good, pay, not too stressful, but thats because we are an R&D company, if you work for a company like Sony, or Qualcomm, and they want product, and they want it now, then you wind up having a higher stress job, sometimes higher pay, and it fits for some people better, just not me. I like my job a lot because I also get to play with fun toys that are on a scale most people don't think exist, and I get to learn a lot, its all new stuff that my degree only gave me a basis to build on.

Engineering is a very difficult degree to get though, I'd say its one of the most academically rigorous majors to have, and will cause you endless torment and study at the cost of a social life for a while, but if you budget your time well, you'll make the time to party.

If you have any questions though, feel free to shoot them.
March 15, 2007 11:28:09 PM

24 tomorrow, drafting at a construction company (mostly steel fabrication), been doing it for only 8 months, and I love it, of course i'm using autocrash (when i'm doing 3d, like right now..) 95% of the day :twisted:
March 15, 2007 11:30:15 PM

DBA, Unix, NT, and Storage admin. Can't wait to ditch the technical stuff.
March 15, 2007 11:30:38 PM

I'm a student getting close to finishing a dual major in Economics and Statistics. Hopefully after that I'll go on to get a PhD in Stats and maybe be a professor. I work for my university and I repair and update 6 of the computer labs on-campus as well as work in them. Doesn't pay the most but I can do my homework while at work so it all works out in the end.
a b à CPUs
March 15, 2007 11:33:39 PM

Ops manager for a Global Just In Time (JIT) Print and Distribution company. 18 years. Not going into what I make per year, but I am extremely happy with my job. I travel around the US, the UK, and Hong Kong 6-8 times per year for a few days to a week at a time, and really have not much to complain about.
March 15, 2007 11:52:43 PM

For the last eight years I've just been a bum living in what many say is a third world shithole. Pay is about $4500 per month.
March 15, 2007 11:55:14 PM

Quote:

Where are you from? I get to do a gap year next year, not doing it though. Just going to get the degree done. Might get some summer work. I've taught myself everything i know.
I see your point, but the course is one extreme to another.
If we could float from internships more often it woudl work better, but one solid year out hardly seems worth it. I can do that year out once i have my degree. The degree is not hard, i'm just dissapointed. I thought i was going to learn science behind computing.

In the first year they teach basic java and at the same time they are teaching about the kernel of an O/S. Luckily i knew a lot about O/S's but if i didn't know crap about programming, how the hell would i understand what a system call is and how an operating works??
It's like teaching someone how to drive a car and expecting them to become a car mechanic at the same time.


I go to the University of Minnesota. Pretty good school. The Computer Science program where I am doesn't do the operating systems class until the 3rd or 4th year. Programming can be a tough concept to grasp right away; strange your college has the operating systems class so early.

A whole year is a long time to be out of class. I'm really anxious to graduate too, so I can understand not wanting to do that.
March 16, 2007 12:01:52 AM

USMC, I get payed to blow sh*t up! Oooraahh! Currently attending DeVry for Networking and Communications Management. But I guess I'm staying in the Corps for life!

Semper Fi
March 16, 2007 12:07:58 AM

I work in tool and die as a cnc operator. For those that don't know tool and die is the designing/building of metal stamping (shearing,shaping) "dies" and plastic injecting molds. There are other types that I work on but the basic point is made. As for the cnc operator part, that is Computer Numerically Controlled machine. It's generally a medium sized machine (the one's I work on vary from the size of a van to the size of about two and a half vans) to extemely large (think two mobile homes stacked on each other plus some). They cut out the shape in the metal to create the form of the part, such as all most any car part that is made of metal or plastic. In some shops an operator does nothing more than receive a toolpath through a network and run said program on his/her machine. Where I work we create our own toolpaths using an easy to use but sophisticated software that develops the "tool's path". We also create these cutter paths by writing machine specific code to make less complex tool paths. Most machinists and diemakers/moldmakers serve an apprenticeship where there are schooling and job hour requirements. I on the other hand was a bit of an anomoly where I served a small portion of an apprenticeship and quit to work for another company that I succeeded at and was eventually promoted to department foreman. In Michigan the last 5 or 6 years the trade has been quite down and I have moved as shops have went out of business and downsized. The hours can be long (I average between 45 and 50 a week now, much less than I use to work). I am hourly and make 60k yearly plus or minus depending on overtime. There are other more computer specific jobs in my field, all relating to CAD/CAM engineering. This has been a good job for me but is difficult to recommend to young people as competition from the world market (cheap foreign labor) has destroyed pay and security much the way it has done to manufacturing jobs. I am sorry this post is so long but I hope it is somewhat helpful.
March 16, 2007 12:08:20 AM

Done a bit of everything over my 17 year career.

DBA and programming are my least favorite, by a long shot.

Had a computer repair shop for almost 3 years, got sick of stupid people. Also worked for one before that for 3 years, worst job EVER ($12/hr!).

Worked for 3 ISP's, current one is a large cable company as a net admin, only deal with networking for 8 cities. It's the best job in the world, full benefits, awsome co-workers, great company. Just gotta do what the NE's say :) 

Second job is a complete net/sys admin for another company of around 70 people with 7 servers (2k3 & TS, 2k, Exchange, SQL, lots of other sh*t), around 20 computers, and 50 terminals. That one's part time, only a few hours a week.

Between the two I'm in the 60k range, not including little side jobs. Considering I'm in the middle of The Least Populous State, not too shaby for only being 27 (yes I started building and selling computers, and programming, when I was 10).

Oh yeah, 3 years of college, most useless three years of my life, MS and Cisco courses are worthless in the real world. Then again, I taught class whenever my instructors were sick, so maybe I'm biased :) 

Wish I made more, wish I had more free time, but my life situation is as perfect as it could be without being a multi-millionare with a private jet......ummm.....jet.....

One tip, avoid kids for as long as possible, then love them more than your computers :) 
March 16, 2007 12:27:06 AM

I was just noticing this is a very "all about me thread", not a lot of comments on each other's posts... in fact I find myself really only checking this thing to see if someone responded to my job post
!