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television in 2004

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Anonymous
October 2, 2004 3:48:33 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

My wife and daughter are watching a movie at this moment on demand on
comcast. They are watching it on my 43inch Samsung with a big black box all
around the movie - at least half of the tv real estate is black. I offered
to fool with the clicker to stretch it or do something with it, but they
don't want me to get involved. "We just want to watch our movie and not
have you fiddling with the tv.

Welcome to tv viewing in 2004. Buy a big screen tv and they're watching a
small picture. Oh well...

More about : television 2004

Anonymous
October 2, 2004 3:48:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
news:D rudnZa9taWeuMPcRVn-vg@comcast.com...
> My wife and daughter are watching a movie at this moment on demand on
> comcast. They are watching it on my 43inch Samsung with a big black box
> all
> around the movie - at least half of the tv real estate is black. I
> offered
> to fool with the clicker to stretch it or do something with it, but they
> don't want me to get involved. "We just want to watch our movie and not
> have you fiddling with the tv.
>
> Welcome to tv viewing in 2004. Buy a big screen tv and they're watching a
> small picture. Oh well...


Sounds like you must have made the mistake of purchasing one of those hybrid
HDTV sets that isn't 16:9.
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 2:57:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote in message
news:CdudnYcOcrAOrcPcRVn-hA@comcast.com...
>
> "larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
> news:D rudnZa9taWeuMPcRVn-vg@comcast.com...
>> My wife and daughter are watching a movie at this moment on demand on
>> comcast. They are watching it on my 43inch Samsung with a big black box
>> all
>> around the movie - at least half of the tv real estate is black. I
>> offered
>> to fool with the clicker to stretch it or do something with it, but they
>> don't want me to get involved. "We just want to watch our movie and not
>> have you fiddling with the tv.
>>
>> Welcome to tv viewing in 2004. Buy a big screen tv and they're watching
>> a
>> small picture. Oh well...
>
>
> Sounds like you must have made the mistake of purchasing one of those
> hybrid HDTV sets that isn't 16:9.

If in 2004 these TVs and broadcasts can't be made to work smarter, then
somebody did a pretty lousy job of designing the system.
Related resources
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 4:02:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote in message
news:CdudnYcOcrAOrcPcRVn-hA@comcast.com...
>
> "larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
> news:D rudnZa9taWeuMPcRVn-vg@comcast.com...
> > My wife and daughter are watching a movie at this moment on demand on
> > comcast. They are watching it on my 43inch Samsung with a big black box
> > all
> > around the movie - at least half of the tv real estate is black. I
> > offered
> > to fool with the clicker to stretch it or do something with it, but they
> > don't want me to get involved. "We just want to watch our movie and not
> > have you fiddling with the tv.
> >
> > Welcome to tv viewing in 2004. Buy a big screen tv and they're watching
a
> > small picture. Oh well...
>
>
> Sounds like you must have made the mistake of purchasing one of those
hybrid
> HDTV sets that isn't 16:9.

No, it's a 16:9 Samsung new DLP. It's just there are so many formats,
ratios, signals, and other cr*p involved with tv viewing these days that you
need 4 remotes and 12 fingers to get it right. I'm always changing the
format, stretching, shrinking, widening, etc, depending on what the crazy
broadcast is like. CBS was broadcasting the other day on HD with tiny
little cbs logos on the side parts (pillar boxing). Quite distracting.
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 4:02:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
news:rrGdnVhZt7N3TcPcRVn-sg@comcast.com...
>
> "Charles Tomaras" <tomaras@tomaras.com> wrote in message
> news:CdudnYcOcrAOrcPcRVn-hA@comcast.com...
>>
>> "larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
>> news:D rudnZa9taWeuMPcRVn-vg@comcast.com...
>> > My wife and daughter are watching a movie at this moment on demand on
>> > comcast. They are watching it on my 43inch Samsung with a big black
>> > box
>> > all
>> > around the movie - at least half of the tv real estate is black. I
>> > offered
>> > to fool with the clicker to stretch it or do something with it, but
>> > they
>> > don't want me to get involved. "We just want to watch our movie and
>> > not
>> > have you fiddling with the tv.
>> >
>> > Welcome to tv viewing in 2004. Buy a big screen tv and they're
>> > watching
> a
>> > small picture. Oh well...
>>
>>
>> Sounds like you must have made the mistake of purchasing one of those
> hybrid
>> HDTV sets that isn't 16:9.
>
> No, it's a 16:9 Samsung new DLP. It's just there are so many formats,
> ratios, signals, and other cr*p involved with tv viewing these days that
> you
> need 4 remotes and 12 fingers to get it right. I'm always changing the
> format, stretching, shrinking, widening, etc, depending on what the crazy
> broadcast is like. CBS was broadcasting the other day on HD with tiny
> little cbs logos on the side parts (pillar boxing). Quite distracting.
>
>

It's really fairly simple. You set your television for it's FULL mode and
you tell your STB and DVD player that you have a 16:9 telelevision. After
that you simply watch television in it's Original Aspect Ratio and you will
rarely need to change anything.
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 7:56:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
news:D rudnZa9taWeuMPcRVn-vg@comcast.com...
> My wife and daughter are watching a movie at this moment on demand on
> comcast. They are watching it on my 43inch Samsung with a big black box
> all
> around the movie - at least half of the tv real estate is black. I
> offered
> to fool with the clicker to stretch it or do something with it, but they
> don't want me to get involved. "We just want to watch our movie and not
> have you fiddling with the tv.
>
> Welcome to tv viewing in 2004. Buy a big screen tv and they're watching a
> small picture. Oh well...
>

Larry,

Probably somewhere in your cable box is a setting for whether your tv is 4:3
or 16:9. If you have it set to 4:3 (probably default) but you have a 16:9
television then you would see a picture with bars on all sides. The reason
for this is that the cable box will actually transmit the black bars for the
top and bottom of the screen that you would see on a standard 4:3 tv.
However, since you're tv is 16:9 it then takes that 4:3 signal (with bars on
top and bottom) and tacks on bars to the sides to display it on your tv.

If your STB is already set to 16:9 and it was only that specific program
that showed up funny then perhaps it was a "letterbox" movie where the black
bars are actually encoded in the signal. In that case there's no good
solution since it's the content itself.

Brad
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 9:51:24 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> If your STB is already set to 16:9 and it was only that specific program
> that showed up funny then perhaps it was a "letterbox" movie where the
black
> bars are actually encoded in the signal. In that case there's no good
> solution since it's the content itself.
>

This would be this case, which we are seeing more and more often, of a
standard definition program being shown in letterbox. Unless you are
watching from 20 ft away, you are probably better off to leave it alone and
watch it with the "big black box all
around the movie", as zooming in on a standard def. show may change from
"small, with decent picture" to "big, with annoyingly poor picture".
Anonymous
October 2, 2004 9:51:25 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"M Schmidt" <martinschmidt57@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:wUB7d.1095$M05.737@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
> > If your STB is already set to 16:9 and it was only that specific program
> > that showed up funny then perhaps it was a "letterbox" movie where the
> black
> > bars are actually encoded in the signal. In that case there's no good
> > solution since it's the content itself.
> >
>
> This would be this case, which we are seeing more and more often, of a
> standard definition program being shown in letterbox. Unless you are
> watching from 20 ft away, you are probably better off to leave it alone
and
> watch it with the "big black box all
> around the movie", as zooming in on a standard def. show may change from
> "small, with decent picture" to "big, with annoyingly poor picture".

I think your right. I called comcast, but it's Saturday so the guy there is
clueless. He thinks the black bars are broadcast by Comcast. There's no
option on the cable box to tell it you have a WS tv. This is comcast "On
Demand" where you select a movie, select to pay on screen, and then watch.
Interestingly we selected the Widescreen version (as opposed to 4:3) hoping
for the best, and this is what we got. So I repeat myself: Here is viewing
tv in 2004, you go through a million settings, select to pay to watch a
movie, select WS version, and get a small picture surrounded on all sides by
huge black bars. Progress, isn't it?
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 1:45:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
news:D rudnZa9taWeuMPcRVn-vg@comcast.com...
> My wife and daughter are watching a movie at this moment on demand on
> comcast. They are watching it on my 43inch Samsung with a big black box
> all
> around the movie - at least half of the tv real estate is black. I
> offered
> to fool with the clicker to stretch it or do something with it, but they
> don't want me to get involved. "We just want to watch our movie and not
> have you fiddling with the tv.
>
> Welcome to tv viewing in 2004. Buy a big screen tv and they're watching a
> small picture. Oh well...

My Comcast SA8000 HD allows you to zoom to fill the screen.

of course if you can't be troubled to push the button, then you are out of
luck

The problem is Comcast's, they letterbox in 4:3 on ON-Demand and PPV
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 1:47:32 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
news:F5OdnRfIG4W9g8LcRVn-ig@comcast.com...
>
> "M Schmidt" <martinschmidt57@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:wUB7d.1095$M05.737@newsread3.news.pas.earthlink.net...
>> > If your STB is already set to 16:9 and it was only that specific
>> > program
>> > that showed up funny then perhaps it was a "letterbox" movie where the
>> black
>> > bars are actually encoded in the signal. In that case there's no good
>> > solution since it's the content itself.
>> >
>>
>> This would be this case, which we are seeing more and more often, of a
>> standard definition program being shown in letterbox. Unless you are
>> watching from 20 ft away, you are probably better off to leave it alone
> and
>> watch it with the "big black box all
>> around the movie", as zooming in on a standard def. show may change from
>> "small, with decent picture" to "big, with annoyingly poor picture".
>
> I think your right. I called comcast, but it's Saturday so the guy there
> is
> clueless. He thinks the black bars are broadcast by Comcast. There's no
> option on the cable box to tell it you have a WS tv. This is comcast "On
> Demand" where you select a movie, select to pay on screen, and then watch.
> Interestingly we selected the Widescreen version (as opposed to 4:3)
> hoping
> for the best, and this is what we got. So I repeat myself: Here is
> viewing
> tv in 2004, you go through a million settings, select to pay to watch a
> movie, select WS version, and get a small picture surrounded on all sides
> by
> huge black bars. Progress, isn't it?

again... unless you hit the zoom key, this is going to be the case

this issue is caused by Comcast, but if you get their SA8000HD STB, then
they also offer a solution
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 2:38:51 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Randy Sweeney" <rsweeney1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:Jt-dnenc-sqmxMLcRVn-og@comcast.com...
>
> "larrylook" <LarryLOOK@noemail.com> wrote in message
> news:D rudnZa9taWeuMPcRVn-vg@comcast.com...
> > My wife and daughter are watching a movie at this moment on demand on
> > comcast. They are watching it on my 43inch Samsung with a big black box
> > all
> > around the movie - at least half of the tv real estate is black. I
> > offered
> > to fool with the clicker to stretch it or do something with it, but they
> > don't want me to get involved. "We just want to watch our movie and not
> > have you fiddling with the tv.
> >
> > Welcome to tv viewing in 2004. Buy a big screen tv and they're watching
a
> > small picture. Oh well...
>
> My Comcast SA8000 HD allows you to zoom to fill the screen.
>
> of course if you can't be troubled to push the button

This is what you're likely to hear on the internet - you're too dumb to just
push a button. Probably true. But I have lots of buttons on my home
theater set-up. When I was my son's age, you had one - an on and off
button. No remotes that program and back up to the computer, either.
Sometimes you yearn for those days. Davey and Goliath, and Gumby looked
just fine in black and white on a 12" tv.
Anonymous
October 3, 2004 6:31:59 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> Interestingly we selected the Widescreen version (as opposed to 4:3)
hoping
> for the best, and this is what we got. So I repeat myself: Here is
viewing
> tv in 2004, you go through a million settings, select to pay to watch a
> movie, select WS version, and get a small picture surrounded on all sides
by
> huge black bars. Progress, isn't it?

Widescreen movies, even with black bars on all sides ARE an improvement that
we are lucky to have more of in 2004. We are very fortunate to have any
movie broadcast in its original aspect ratio regardless of whether it is HD
or SD. The alternative is pan and scan, which is the technique by which
movies are hacked up into pieces of the original scenes to make them full
screen in 4:3. An example is a scene in Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade
where Indy and his father are speaking to each other face to face. In the
original widescreen aspect ratio (not 4:3) you see both of them in the
picture. In the pan and scan 4:3 full screen version, you only see one at a
time. Sorry to labor this if you were already aware.

The real solution here is to have more (all) programming in HD. HD is an
inherently wide screen format, though you may still get some thin black bars
since movies can differ somewhat from the 16:9 aspect ratio of your set.
You could even get an old movie that was shot in 4:3 and get big black bars
on the sides! This will still be a "problem" even when we have flying
cars -- not all movies will happen to fit the screen of any particular TV.
So quit worrying and pushing buttons, set your stuff up for widescreen,
leave it there, and learn to love the black bars.

Happy watching,
-Martin
October 4, 2004 6:54:22 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

The real solution here is to have more (all) programming in HD. HD is an
inherently wide screen format, though you may still get some thin black bars
since movies can differ somewhat from the 16:9 aspect ratio of your set.
> You could even get an old movie that was shot in 4:3 and get big black
> bars
> on the sides! This will still be a "problem" even when we have flying
> cars -- not all movies will happen to fit the screen of any particular TV.
> So quit worrying and pushing buttons, set your stuff up for widescreen,
> leave it there, and learn to love the black bars.

More complex than this. If you view a black boxed wide screen program you
see the entire image. If you see the wide screen program on a wide set you
most likely lose some of the view because of overscan that is built into the
system.

Richard.
Anonymous
October 5, 2004 11:42:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Richard" <rfeirste at nycap.rr.com> wrote in message
news:10m372tj5m2lr20@corp.supernews.com...
> More complex than this. If you view a black boxed wide screen program you
> see the entire image. If you see the wide screen program on a wide set you
> most likely lose some of the view because of overscan that is built into
the
> system.
>
> Richard.
>

Shhhhh. That's supposed to be our little secret...
Anonymous
October 9, 2004 2:20:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Charles Tomaras (tomaras@tomaras.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
> It's really fairly simple. You set your television for it's FULL mode and
> you tell your STB and DVD player that you have a 16:9 telelevision. After
> that you simply watch television in it's Original Aspect Ratio and you will
> rarely need to change anything.

What he was running into was a letterboxed movie inside an NTSC 4:3 frame.
His 16:9 set showed it with "bars on all 4 sides" because the transmission
had bars on the top and bottom, and his set put bars on the side to keep the
4:3 aspect ratio correct...it doesn't know that the content is letterboxed
(although it *could*, but no sets do this automatically).

So, in this case, he should use a "zoom" mode, not a "full" mode.

--
Jeff Rife | "But as much as everybody loves you, there is
SPAM bait: | one question that keeps coming up...how dumb
AskDOJ@usdoj.gov | WAS she?"
spam@ftc.gov | -- Tempus to Lois Lane
Anonymous
October 9, 2004 4:59:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jeff Rife" <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote in message
news:MPG.1bd114e27350d5d8989871@news.nabs.net...
> Charles Tomaras (tomaras@tomaras.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
>> It's really fairly simple. You set your television for it's FULL mode and
>> you tell your STB and DVD player that you have a 16:9 telelevision. After
>> that you simply watch television in it's Original Aspect Ratio and you
>> will
>> rarely need to change anything.
>
> What he was running into was a letterboxed movie inside an NTSC 4:3 frame.
> His 16:9 set showed it with "bars on all 4 sides" because the transmission
> had bars on the top and bottom, and his set put bars on the side to keep
> the
> 4:3 aspect ratio correct...it doesn't know that the content is letterboxed
> (although it *could*, but no sets do this automatically).
>
> So, in this case, he should use a "zoom" mode, not a "full" mode.

I guess people don't remember the old days when you had to not only set the
channel (by walking up to the TV) but also adjust the fine tuning, the
vertical and horizontal hold, the chroma and luminance and then stand in one
place so the picture wouldn't ghost.

Reminds me of an old Jetsons, "that Spacely is a slavedriver, I had to push
the button TWICE today!"
Anonymous
October 9, 2004 4:59:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Randy Sweeney" <rsweeney1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:McudnRUsS7JLhfXcRVn-hg@comcast.com...
>
> "Jeff Rife" <wevsr@nabs.net> wrote in message
> news:MPG.1bd114e27350d5d8989871@news.nabs.net...
>> Charles Tomaras (tomaras@tomaras.com) wrote in alt.tv.tech.hdtv:
>>> It's really fairly simple. You set your television for it's FULL mode
>>> and
>>> you tell your STB and DVD player that you have a 16:9 telelevision.
>>> After
>>> that you simply watch television in it's Original Aspect Ratio and you
>>> will
>>> rarely need to change anything.
>>
>> What he was running into was a letterboxed movie inside an NTSC 4:3
>> frame.
>> His 16:9 set showed it with "bars on all 4 sides" because the
>> transmission
>> had bars on the top and bottom, and his set put bars on the side to keep
>> the
>> 4:3 aspect ratio correct...it doesn't know that the content is
>> letterboxed
>> (although it *could*, but no sets do this automatically).
>>
>> So, in this case, he should use a "zoom" mode, not a "full" mode.
>
> I guess people don't remember the old days when you had to not only set
> the channel (by walking up to the TV) but also adjust the fine tuning, the
> vertical and horizontal hold, the chroma and luminance and then stand in
> one place so the picture wouldn't ghost.
>
> Reminds me of an old Jetsons, "that Spacely is a slavedriver, I had to
> push the button TWICE today!"
\

I got stuck in a bad "motel" last week and the remote was missing from the
television and the only one the "front desk" could produce did not work. I
honestly couldn't believe how totally frustrated I was! I actually set the
desk chair near the tv and surfed from three feet away for half an hour
before I could settle on something to lay down in bed to. We have come a
long way in our demands for creature comforts and ease of use.
!