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Do Quad-Core CPU's produce more heat than Dual-Core CPU's?

Last response: in Overclocking
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March 24, 2007 7:57:06 PM

As in, would it be more difficult to overclock a Q6600 to 3.5Ghz than it would be an E6600? And if, how much more difficult?

Thnx!
March 24, 2007 8:37:57 PM

Quote:
Do Quad-Core CPU's produce more heat than Dual-Core CPU's?


They certainly do
maybe around 50% more
March 24, 2007 8:59:41 PM

as far as overclocking goes i dont think the difference between overclocking a quad core vs a dual core will matter since having the quad core will benefit you more in the near future than a dual core will
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March 24, 2007 9:07:41 PM

Quote:
Do Quad-Core CPU's produce more heat than Dual-Core CPU's?


They certainly do
maybe around 50% more

Does that hurt their overclocking potential?
March 24, 2007 9:20:56 PM

Quote:
Do Quad-Core CPU's produce more heat than Dual-Core CPU's?


They certainly do
maybe around 50% more


50% wauuuuw well then a 60c c2d on load would be a 90c quad on load :roll: thats hot
March 24, 2007 9:39:13 PM

Better check your math... 60C * 150% = 90C not 120C

Also your reasoning is flawed... I don't know if the 50% figure is correct, however producing 50% more heat does not mean that a chip will run 50% hotter. You are not taking several things into account including the ambient air temperature and the heat dissipation properties of the heatsink.
March 24, 2007 9:42:22 PM

Quote:
Do Quad-Core CPU's produce more heat than Dual-Core CPU's?


They certainly do
maybe around 50% more


50% wauuuuw well then a 60c c2d on load would be a 120c quad on load :roll: thats hotSometimes its not the speed; its the multitasking. I'll be looking at a quad-core when they drop far down... Quad-core will be adopted for gaming, probably as the rest of the industry moves completely to dual-core. You can still game pretty well on a 3-year-old processor; its more about the gaming need a better video card that slows it down.
March 24, 2007 10:05:07 PM

oh yea wrong of me :p  i made it %100


i think the stock heatsink is the same as the c2d so it would be the same but i dont think a quad would make %50 more heat than a c2d even tho its twice the cores
March 24, 2007 10:13:06 PM

well same for me when the price is right but quad is the future and with the shrink less watt heat and higher mhz :b its about %40 faster than a c2d in multitasking

thats right but i dont wanna play games on a old processor with a highend graphic card and loose frames because of it =p
March 24, 2007 10:14:51 PM

Quote:
Better check your math... 60C * 150% = 90C not 120C

Also your reasoning is flawed... I don't know if the 50% figure is correct, however producing 50% more heat does not mean that a chip will run 50% hotter. You are not taking several things into account including the ambient air temperature and the heat dissipation properties of the heatsink.


I got a load temp of around 50C with my old E6700 now I get 79C with my quad core

and oh yer in core temp it says the thermal barrier for quad is 100C and the 6700 was 70 (I think)
March 24, 2007 10:27:05 PM

They produce 100% more heat.

They have 100% more die area, and a 100% higher TDP :p 

Core 2 Duo e6700 2.66GHz*2 : 65W TDP

Core 2 Extreme QX6700 2.66GHz*4 : 130W TDP.

This does not mean that the CPU will go from 50°C to 100°C, apart from anything else you are doubling the number from an arbitrary zero point, wouldn't it make more sense to start from 0°K ? :p 

However, 100% increased heat output does not equal 100% increased temps. It is harder to cool a quad core CPU, but with a decent air cooling solution Core 2 Duo is limited more by the maximum voltage you want to put through it than temps in my experience. With water, the higher TDP would not be an issue.
March 25, 2007 2:52:56 AM

The Xeon version quad core at 1.86GHz only draws 50 watts max...
I would imagine it would run cooler than a E6300.
March 25, 2007 8:04:21 AM

Impressive, they must be taking them from high bins to do that....

Don't suppose there is an LGA775 version of that CPU tho is there?
!