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overclocking with stock voltage?

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March 25, 2007 9:35:41 AM

How can people achieve 50% overclock with stock voltage. I read in a lot of reviews that guys are running Opteron 170 @2.9ghz with stock voltage. Can you increase the CPU multiplier without increasing voltage? Do these guys not know what stock voltage means. It doesn't make sense to me that a chip rated for 1.8Ghz @1.35v (or whatever it is) will run stable at 2.9Ghz @ 1.35v. I currently have mine going at 2.9Ghz @1.45v. I had to drop the multiplier because of the MB. I would have liked to have not voided the warranty. Oh well!
March 25, 2007 9:46:09 AM

I was tempted to write it in the other thread, but decided to be courteous. Bel Air is about fifteen miles north of Baltimore. Not to foggy.
Can I move this thread to another forum?
March 26, 2007 5:25:07 AM

Quote:
How can people achieve 50% overclock with stock voltage. I read in a lot of reviews that guys are running Opteron 170 @2.9ghz with stock voltage. Can you increase the CPU multiplier without increasing voltage? Do these guys not know what stock voltage means. It doesn't make sense to me that a chip rated for 1.8Ghz @1.35v (or whatever it is) will run stable at 2.9Ghz @ 1.35v. I currently have mine going at 2.9Ghz @1.45v. I had to drop the multiplier because of the MB. I would have liked to have not voided the warranty. Oh well!

i think it is relevant to the architectural design of the chip. while there are a lot of people OCing Core 2 using stock voltage (i'm one of them :p  ), i rarely hear ppl talking about OCing X2s using stock voltage.

in terms of Opteron OCing, i think its due to Opteron's manufacture quality.

P.S. personally i have an E6300 @ 2.8 Ghz (54% OC), while undervolted (1.25V, i think the stock was 1.3V).
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March 26, 2007 6:40:27 AM

Chip architechture (may allow you to actually OC while undervolting) and luck of the draw play a big part, and many people forget about motherboard Vdroop at CPU load. My motherboard averages <0.046 Vdroop with my OC and I am able to undervolt my chip. If my Vdroop was worse I wouldn't be able to undervolt, and if it was bad enough I would have to up my Vcore past stock voltage to keep my OC stable.
March 26, 2007 6:47:21 AM

The idea is to burn in the chip first, at a raised voltage, then lower the voltage, once the e-pathways are set up.
It does require a mobo with high quality vrms, as even a slight variation can cause problems.
While your chip may have required 1.45 volts to get to 2.9 originally, it may be stable at a lower voltage now.
No guarantees, YMMV.
March 26, 2007 8:25:01 AM

Quote:
How can people achieve 50% overclock with stock voltage. I read in a lot of reviews that guys are running Opteron 170 @2.9ghz with stock voltage. Can you increase the CPU multiplier without increasing voltage? Do these guys not know what stock voltage means. It doesn't make sense to me that a chip rated for 1.8Ghz @1.35v (or whatever it is) will run stable at 2.9Ghz @ 1.35v. I currently have mine going at 2.9Ghz @1.45v. I had to drop the multiplier because of the MB. I would have liked to have not voided the warranty. Oh well!

i think it is relevant to the architectural design of the chip. while there are a lot of people OCing Core 2 using stock voltage (i'm one of them :p  ), i rarely hear ppl talking about OCing X2s using stock voltage.

in terms of Opteron OCing, i think its due to Opteron's manufacture quality.

P.S. personally i have an E6300 @ 2.8 Ghz (54% OC), while undervolted (1.25V, i think the stock was 1.3V).I think good cooling has a lot to do with it also. Using your 54% O/C, even with stock vCore, the chip will be producing more heat, as electrons race around faster, etc. :? But i see you are cooling with water, which takes heat out of the equation, to more of an extent than with stock air. Wusy's discussed this many times...

Examples:( hypothetical)

With an E6300@1860 + 1.30v..stock cooling giving a load temp of say...43C

Now..same chip @ 3200 + 1.40v.. aftermarket air cooling giving a load temp of ... again 43C. This chip would be less stable than at stock speed, even though load temps are the same, as the higher the voltage, the cooler the chip needs to run in order to be stable. Look at WR runs w/LN2. Say you have an E6300 on LN2 running @ 4200 w/load temp of -40C and 1.80 vCore. You have to think that they should be able raise clock-speeds until they hit 43C(as it runs super-stable at 43C & stock speed), but no... they hit the chips limit at -40C. So that kind of proves that chips walk a fine line between cooling and voltage. :wink:
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March 26, 2007 1:52:37 PM

My chip is undervolted at all speeds greater than idle through remapping the voltage-frequency points for Cool 'n Quiet. For some reason, I can't drop VID_MIN below 1.100 V, but, oh well. I my X2 4200+ running at 1.225 V at its top speed of 2.20 GHz and it is rock-solid. It will run the OS without locking up at voltages below 1.200 V, but it doesn't pass Folding@Home tests at less than 1.225 V even though I could run Prime95 all day long at 1.200 V and a touch lower and it would never error out.

I haven't done more overclocking than too see how far my CPU will go up on the stock 1.35 Vcore. Apparently my chip will do a little over 2.5 GHz and then it needs more volts. I hadn't tried overclocking since my chip was almost brand-new, so maybe it'll do a tad better. I probably won't try it as I like my computer quiet and cool rather than hot and noisy but a tad faster.
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