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what does svchost.exe do in windows,

Tags:
  • Firewalls
  • Svchost.Exe
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
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February 6, 2006 10:18:01 AM

recently a process named "generic host process for win32 services" with filename svchost.exe keeps popping up in my firewall asking permission to reach a number of ips. it is not one or two but dozen times in a few seconds.

is it safe to let it go thru my firewall and what app would invoke this thing?
I have checked for viruses and adwares but turned out nothing and other apps would use their real firenames in asking permission of my firewall.

More about : svchost exe windows

February 7, 2006 4:24:15 PM

check here
and here
Google is your friend for information. Try to use it first. Youll learn a lot on your own and then you can look like a genius to other people! :D 
March 15, 2006 9:51:04 PM

Also, you might want to download this handy program.

Process Explorer [click]

(Scroll to the bottom of the page and select your OS to download)

It's a freeware tool, that does many wonderful things, one of them being allowing you to right click a running process and google it. This tool would have been helpful for your svchost.exe query :) 
Related resources
March 21, 2006 4:51:06 PM

I think there is some confusion about this topic. The first 2 replies answer the header of the topic. But the text refers to svchost.exe wanting to connect to the internet. I have the same question.

What program wants this access? Why? I have found that if i want to open IE, there has to be approval for a svchost.exe to access the internet otherwise IE will not open. Why? (I am using Zonealarm)

Then, as with Meganova, several more request access. I have always blocked these other requests with no harm. I have not found any explanation for this.

How can I find out which programs or services are making the requests?

I am running Windows XP sp2 with all updates.
March 24, 2006 11:55:13 AM

It's a service that other programs use to connect to the internet. The following description might make it clearer.

A generic host process is a name that Windows gives to many different services running on the computer that don't have any other name. An example of a generic host process is svchost.exe. Should you block a generic host process?

Typically svchost or any of the other generic host processes should be permited, at least temporarily.

Please be aware that some viruses and/or Trojans can infect or replace svchost.exe, so svchost.exe then becomes a virus. However, any modern antivirus software can detect when svchost.exe (or any other generic host process) becomes a virus, and stop it from doing any harm. We recommend scanning your computer for viruses at least once a week.

Is there a way to see a list of the services being associated with svchost?

If your operating system is Windows XP then you can view a list of the services using the following instructions.

Click on the Start button and go to the Run line. Type "cmd" without the quotation marks and click the "OK" button. Type "tasklist /svc" (without the quotation marks). Hit the "Enter" button on your keyboard to run the above command

@haventgotaclue

What is meganova.? Does it need to connect to the internet to work? Generally if the program dose not require net access to work you can go ahead and block it. Oh and do not give it server access.
March 30, 2006 3:54:15 PM

meganova is the person that started this thread.

i am using xp sp2 fully updated.
i tried using the dos command as you suggested but all i got was that tasklist was not a valid command internal, external, etc.

i understand that svchost.exe is used as a generic means for access. what i want to know is why when i am not using any process that requires the access. i do updates manually. is this just microsoft? right now i am mostly researching utilities, etc so that i can protect my kids' computer (as they go everywhere they shouldn't).
March 31, 2006 12:59:28 PM

Quote:
meganova is the person that started this thread.


Sorry about that :oops: 

Quote:

is this just microsoft? right now i am mostly researching utilities, etc so that i can protect my kids' computer (as they go everywhere they shouldn't).


MS and a bunch of 3rd party software suppliers. Best is if you know that nothing should be accessing the net at the moment temporaraly block it with your firewall.

Could be a problem when the kids access the net when u r not there. Then again IMHO children should not have access to the net without parental supervision.
April 1, 2006 2:45:10 PM

try telling a 17 year-old that.

thanks for your help.

marc
April 3, 2006 11:39:32 AM

U r welcome

17 years! In my books that’s an adult. At 17 I had my 40MB HDD filled with stuff that would make me blush now. (and that was using sneaker-net file sharing)

My son is only 6 so I (we :oops:  ) browse Disney, Bionicles and comic book stuff together. So it’s a total different ballgame.
Anonymous
January 17, 2009 11:54:55 PM

Im 17 myself and ive got a 500 gig drive that is full of said material

back to the topic it is possible that for some reason your computert is trying to update and your firewall is trying to stop it its very strange it would explain the symptons but most firewalls are automatically set up to stop this its really hard to tell you what is happening without the exact message
!