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HDTV -- where to begin????

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October 8, 2004 1:17:37 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Hi all,

I'm wanting to jump into the world of HDTV, and tough I am familiar
with the formats and such, I'm not at all familiar with equipment,
options, or what lies ahead. My dad recently purchased a HDTV, and
I'm helping him with his setup .. but now I'm thinking of making the
leap myself.

Here's a few questions --
I live in Waco, Tx (about 90 miles from Dallas and Austin), and though
Waco has several HDTV stations, I'd love to watch the ones from Dallas
and Austin. Any possible way with a nice/large antenna to get these?

I also have Time Warner cable, which does have the local channels and
maybe a hand-full of cable channels in HD, but I'd probably for-go the
cable costs and get them via antenna.

Are there any satelite (not DirecTV or anything like that) solutions
to get other HDTV channels without a monthly fee? I don't mind
investing in an old-school satelite dish that picks-up stations in HD
if possible.

Thanks for any suggestions or ideas on this. Also what web resources
do you guys normally use to research TV's and receivers? I'd love to
read-up on reviews and info before dropping a chunk of change. I
don't trust the guys at Best Buy.

Thanks again, and take care,

Sam

More about : hdtv begin

Anonymous
October 8, 2004 4:32:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Alex" <samalex@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:b8d0e42e.0410080817.7baf3ba7@posting.google.com...
> Hi all,
>
> I'm wanting to jump into the world of HDTV, and tough I am familiar
> with the formats and such, I'm not at all familiar with equipment,
> options, or what lies ahead. My dad recently purchased a HDTV, and
> I'm helping him with his setup .. but now I'm thinking of making the
> leap myself.

As are many of us.

>
> Here's a few questions --
> I live in Waco, Tx (about 90 miles from Dallas and Austin), and though
> Waco has several HDTV stations, I'd love to watch the ones from Dallas
> and Austin. Any possible way with a nice/large antenna to get these?

If you can get an analog signal from Dallas, you may be able to get their
digital signal. If the analog signal is weak and snowy, you will have a
tough time with HDTV. 90 miles is probably a bit too far though. You should
go to www.antennaweb.org and to an antenna search.

>
> I also have Time Warner cable, which does have the local channels and
> maybe a hand-full of cable channels in HD, but I'd probably for-go the
> cable costs and get them via antenna.
>
> Are there any satelite (not DirecTV or anything like that) solutions
> to get other HDTV channels without a monthly fee? I don't mind
> investing in an old-school satelite dish that picks-up stations in HD
> if possible.

No first hand knowledge, but the old-school dishes are often referred to as
BUDs for Big Ugly Dish. Use that in your searches.

>
> Thanks for any suggestions or ideas on this. Also what web resources
> do you guys normally use to research TV's and receivers? I'd love to
> read-up on reviews and info before dropping a chunk of change. I
> don't trust the guys at Best Buy.

The best source of information from real users is at www.avsforum.com

Brad Houser
October 9, 2004 12:01:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>I live in Waco, Tx (about 90 miles from Dallas and Austin), and though
>Waco has several HDTV stations, I'd love to watch the ones from Dallas
>and Austin. Any possible way with a nice/large antenna to get these?
Waco to Dallas = 88 miles
Waco to Ft. Worth = 83 miles
Waco to Austin = 88 miles
Waco to Houston = 161 miles
Waco to Arlington = 80 miles
Waco to Abilene = 164 miles
(Distances courtesy GeoBytes City Distance Tool
http://www.geobytes.com/CityDistanceTool.htm)

The practical limit for a big rooftop antenna with a preamp is 60
miles, so the stations in these cities are out of reach over the air.

O.K. So what about the Waco area? Looking at checkhd.com shows that 3
stations currently transmit HDTV over the air in the Waco area:
KCEN-DT NBC 9.1
KWTX-DT CBS 10.1
KWKT-DTV FOX 44.1

So that's it for you're free HDTV options. 3 stations.

If you're going to pay, and you have room for a big dish, there's a
clear winner - 4DTV (www.4dtv.com). You could get a 8-10 foot dish and
subscribe to 4DTV for C-band. For $30-$40 a month, it totally blows
Direct TV, Dish Networks, and cable away. For $60 a month, you get
almost totally unrestricted access to all of the broadcast satellites
in the Northern hemisphere. It includes commercial free wildfeeds
(look it up) and 1st generation feeds. For example, you can watch the
Leno feed, commercial free, as it is being transmitted to the network
just minutes after taping in the studio is done at 5:30pm. Watch live
events on either coast without the network delay. It's pretty
amazing. And lots of what 4DTV carries is in HD.

Hope this is helpful to you.
Related resources
Anonymous
October 9, 2004 4:21:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 8 Oct 2004 12:32:05 -0700, "Brad Houser"
<bradDOThouser@intel.com> wrote:

>
>"Alex" <samalex@gmail.com> wrote in message
>news:b8d0e42e.0410080817.7baf3ba7@posting.google.com...
>> Hi all,
>>
>> I'm wanting to jump into the world of HDTV, and tough I am familiar
>> with the formats and such, I'm not at all familiar with equipment,
>> options, or what lies ahead. My dad recently purchased a HDTV, and
>> I'm helping him with his setup .. but now I'm thinking of making the
>> leap myself.
>
>As are many of us.
>
>>
>> Here's a few questions --
>> I live in Waco, Tx (about 90 miles from Dallas and Austin), and though
>> Waco has several HDTV stations, I'd love to watch the ones from Dallas
>> and Austin. Any possible way with a nice/large antenna to get these?
>
>If you can get an analog signal from Dallas, you may be able to get their
>digital signal. If the analog signal is weak and snowy, you will have a
>tough time with HDTV. 90 miles is probably a bit too far though. You should
>go to www.antennaweb.org and to an antenna search.
>
>>
>> I also have Time Warner cable, which does have the local channels and
>> maybe a hand-full of cable channels in HD, but I'd probably for-go the
>> cable costs and get them via antenna.
>>
>> Are there any satelite (not DirecTV or anything like that) solutions
>> to get other HDTV channels without a monthly fee? I don't mind
>> investing in an old-school satelite dish that picks-up stations in HD
>> if possible.
>
>No first hand knowledge, but the old-school dishes are often referred to as
>BUDs for Big Ugly Dish. Use that in your searches.
>
>>
>> Thanks for any suggestions or ideas on this. Also what web resources
>> do you guys normally use to research TV's and receivers? I'd love to
>> read-up on reviews and info before dropping a chunk of change. I
>> don't trust the guys at Best Buy.


I am familiar with your area. Only if your at ground level or on a
slight hill when looking toward Dallas would I try this. You should
be able to go up 30 to 35 feet with a 8 bow tie antenna. Be sure to
use 4 guy wires attached to a good tight clamp on the upper mast.
RG6 works best for coax. At your distance you would have to use an
antenna mounted pre-amp.
(UHF would be best)

Be sure to ground at the mast base using a copper wire and radiator
clamp to a 8 foot ground rod or other equal ground. This grounding
seems to keep the lightning away.

You don't get the same gain from a combined UHF/VHF antenna and
amplifier. It would take one of the largest size antennas in that
case.

Using a map aim the antenna to Cedar Hill, Texas where all the
Dallas/Ft. Worth digital stations are located. You may be able to
peak the signal using a analog station from Dallas. Your in luck,
most stations run maximum power in the huge cities.

I'm not sure what's going on with WFAA channel 8. I see they show
their digital is on VHF channel 9.1. I think they will have to move
to the UHF band in 2005 or is it 2006.

When looking at antenna web be sure to list the Ft. Worth channels.
If you look their also located at Cedar Hill.

hdtvfan
Anonymous
October 9, 2004 12:38:51 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <p3vem0hfd701t5u4tmqlin6r7pipt45184@4ax.com>,
hdtvfan@echolink.com says...
> I'm not sure what's going on with WFAA channel 8. I see they show
> their digital is on VHF channel 9.1. I think they will have to move
> to the UHF band in 2005 or is it 2006.

There is no requirement that digital broadcasting be on UHF. At the
present the only requirement is that stations return one of their two
frequencies to the FCC. They can return their current digital
frequency and switch their digital transmission to their current
analog channel. There are cases where that makes sense. (Ch 2-6 and
above 52 are probably going to go awsy.)

/Chris, AA6SQ
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 1:01:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 8 Oct 2004, Alex wrote:
> I'm wanting to jump into the world of HDTV, and tough I am familiar
> with the formats and such, I'm not at all familiar with equipment,
> options, or what lies ahead. My dad recently purchased a HDTV, and
> I'm helping him with his setup .. but now I'm thinking of making the
> leap myself.
>
> Here's a few questions --
> I live in Waco, Tx (about 90 miles from Dallas and Austin), and though
> Waco has several HDTV stations, I'd love to watch the ones from Dallas
> and Austin. Any possible way with a nice/large antenna to get these?
>
> I also have Time Warner cable, which does have the local channels and
> maybe a hand-full of cable channels in HD, but I'd probably for-go the
> cable costs and get them via antenna.
>
> Are there any satelite (not DirecTV or anything like that) solutions
> to get other HDTV channels without a monthly fee? I don't mind
> investing in an old-school satelite dish that picks-up stations in HD
> if possible.

PBS-HD is transmitted using MPEG2-DVB on the Ku band on satellite AMC3.

You should probably check into the rec.video.satellite.* newsgroups.
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 3:36:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Check out my HDTV Buyers FAQ. I like to think it's a good stating
point. This newsgroup is a great place to get specific answers.

http://hdtv.0catch.com

-Jeremy


samalex@gmail.com (Alex) wrote in message news:<b8d0e42e.0410080817.7baf3ba7@posting.google.com>...
> Hi all,
>
> I'm wanting to jump into the world of HDTV, and tough I am familiar
> with the formats and such, I'm not at all familiar with equipment,
> options, or what lies ahead. My dad recently purchased a HDTV, and
> I'm helping him with his setup .. but now I'm thinking of making the
> leap myself.
>
> Here's a few questions --
> I live in Waco, Tx (about 90 miles from Dallas and Austin), and though
> Waco has several HDTV stations, I'd love to watch the ones from Dallas
> and Austin. Any possible way with a nice/large antenna to get these?
>
> I also have Time Warner cable, which does have the local channels and
> maybe a hand-full of cable channels in HD, but I'd probably for-go the
> cable costs and get them via antenna.
>
> Are there any satelite (not DirecTV or anything like that) solutions
> to get other HDTV channels without a monthly fee? I don't mind
> investing in an old-school satelite dish that picks-up stations in HD
> if possible.
>
> Thanks for any suggestions or ideas on this. Also what web resources
> do you guys normally use to research TV's and receivers? I'd love to
> read-up on reviews and info before dropping a chunk of change. I
> don't trust the guys at Best Buy.
>
> Thanks again, and take care,
>
> Sam
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 5:01:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Chris Thomas" <cthomas@mminternet.com> wrote in message
news:MPG.1bd1a5e493068174989874@news.mminternet.com...
> In article <p3vem0hfd701t5u4tmqlin6r7pipt45184@4ax.com>,
> hdtvfan@echolink.com says...
> > I'm not sure what's going on with WFAA channel 8. I see they show
> > their digital is on VHF channel 9.1. I think they will have to move
> > to the UHF band in 2005 or is it 2006.
>
> There is no requirement that digital broadcasting be on UHF. At the
> present the only requirement is that stations return one of their two
> frequencies to the FCC. They can return their current digital
> frequency and switch their digital transmission to their current
> analog channel. There are cases where that makes sense. (Ch 2-6 and
> above 52 are probably going to go awsy.)
>
> /Chris, AA6SQ

We've already lost 70-82 UHF and the FCC plans to sell off 50-69 but I
thought that 2-50 were the final OTA channels. The reason that most in my
area have their digital channels at 52, 54, 57, 59 is that when required to
go all digital they will revert to their regular channels ie: 40, 3, 32, 44
so we would have in this area: 3, 8, 10, 16, 28, 32, 38, 40, 44 with Fort
Meyers 11, 20, 26, 46 and 36 and Cape Coral 30
Anonymous
October 10, 2004 9:42:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Jeff Rigby wrote:
> "Chris Thomas" <cthomas@mminternet.com> wrote in message
> news:MPG.1bd1a5e493068174989874@news.mminternet.com...
>
>>In article <p3vem0hfd701t5u4tmqlin6r7pipt45184@4ax.com>,
>>hdtvfan@echolink.com says...
>>
>>>I'm not sure what's going on with WFAA channel 8. I see they show
>>>their digital is on VHF channel 9.1. I think they will have to move
>>>to the UHF band in 2005 or is it 2006.
>>
>>There is no requirement that digital broadcasting be on UHF. At the
>>present the only requirement is that stations return one of their two
>>frequencies to the FCC. They can return their current digital
>>frequency and switch their digital transmission to their current
>>analog channel. There are cases where that makes sense. (Ch 2-6 and
>>above 52 are probably going to go awsy.)
>>
>>/Chris, AA6SQ
>
>
> We've already lost 70-82 UHF and the FCC plans to sell off 50-69 but I
> thought that 2-50 were the final OTA channels. The reason that most in my
> area have their digital channels at 52, 54, 57, 59 is that when required to
> go all digital they will revert to their regular channels ie: 40, 3, 32, 44
> so we would have in this area: 3, 8, 10, 16, 28, 32, 38, 40, 44 with Fort
> Meyers 11, 20, 26, 46 and 36 and Cape Coral 30
>
>
The FCC has already sold off channels 54, 55 and 59.
October 16, 2004 6:13:12 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Jeff Rigby" <jeffg212@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:MMCdnYJxsNtQ9_TcRVn-iQ@comcast.com...
> We've already lost 70-82 UHF and the FCC plans to sell off 50-69 but I
> thought that 2-50 were the final OTA channels. The reason that most in my
> area have their digital channels at 52, 54, 57, 59 is that when required
> to
> go all digital they will revert to their regular channels ie: 40, 3, 32,
> 44
> so we would have in this area: 3, 8, 10, 16, 28, 32, 38, 40, 44 with Fort
> Meyers 11, 20, 26, 46 and 36 and Cape Coral 30

If I were a broadcaster with my analog on VHF and digital on UHF, when the
time came to return one frequency I'd probably give up the VHF. In many
cities (including here in Washington DC), all OTA digital signals are
currently UHF, so customers have installed UHF-only antennas. The last
thing I'd want is to lose viewers because they now suddenly need a VHF
antenna to receive the digital signal they used to get on UHF.
Rob
!