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A Beginner's Guide For WaterCooling Your PC

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  • CPUs
  • Water Cooling
  • Components
Last response: in CPUs
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Are you going to get Water-cooling?

Total: 27 votes (1 blank vote)

  • Yes, it is much better for OC and noise
  • 43 %
  • No, it''s too much trouble
  • 27 %
  • Maybe, if I can get one system for CPU/GPU/HDD
  • 31 %
March 28, 2007 2:05:03 PM

Tom's has put up a new article on water-cooling. It looks pretty cool as my next box WILL be water-cooled whenever I decide I feel like putting it together.

For all who hate fans on every component, this is the way to go.


Linkage!

More about : beginner guide watercooling

March 28, 2007 2:12:17 PM

8O
A decent post, congrats!

IMO, if you go the C2D route, then purchasing a $50 aftermarket quality Air Cooler/Heatsink will drastically improve cooling compared to the stock cooler, and also can be very quiet. And still gives you the ability to OC a stock E6600 at 2.4GHz all the way up to 3.2GHz and beyond.

I too have a BigWater 745 system which I used on my Opteron 175, before it (the Opteron) died from OCng just 20% within a little over a year.

Was planning on using on my C2D, but after I tried some tests with it, I decided that the Zalman 9700 was very good, and quieter with less clutter and much less maintenance and hassles...
March 28, 2007 2:14:54 PM

Quote:
8O
A decent post, congrats!

IMO, if you go the C2D route, then purchasing a $50 aftermarket quality Air Cooler/Heatsink will drastically improve cooling compared to the stock cooler, and also can be very quiet. And still gives you the ability to OC a stock E6600 at 2.4GHz all the way up to 3.2GHz and beyond.

I too have a BigWater 745 system which I used on my Opteron 175, before it died from OCng just 20% within a little over a year.

Was planning on using on my C2D, but after I tried some tests with it, I decided that the Zalman 9700 was very good, and quieter with less clutter and much less maintenance and hassles...



I have to turn up my TV cause my 4400+/7800GT OC/ PSU make so much noise it nearly covers up my TV.

Water-cooling is a good thing.

DOWN WITH LOUD FANS!!
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March 28, 2007 2:26:23 PM

I'll consider it in the future when i get a new case. Will be a complete rebuid though. I'd want a huge case too.
March 28, 2007 2:57:58 PM

Quote:
I'll consider it in the future when i get a new case. Will be a complete rebuid though. I'd want a huge case too.


The article has info on external setups and integrated cases. Water-cooling is now easy and GPU makers are providng water blocks for some SKUs. They are too expensive though. I guess it would be fun to take the HSF off a GPU.

I'll definitely find out on my next build.
March 28, 2007 4:02:46 PM

Quote:
I have to turn up my TV cause my 4400+/7800GT OC/ PSU make so much noise it nearly covers up my TV.

Water-cooling is a good thing.

DOWN WITH LOUD FANS!!


I'm considering water cooling for my next build as well. The case I bought is a ThermalTake Eureka that has an extra large interior and holes predrilled in the case for water tubes. Even if I stick with air cooling, I figure the larger case interior should help a bit for temperatures. This will take much thought, but I have a couple months before the build, so am in no hurry.

One of my computers is running a 4400+ with a 7800 GTX and I well agree, the case fan noise if loud. Have to turn up the sound system, TV, or talk loudly to overcome it. Have considered going to larger, slower running fans. I'm still unsure about water cooling. Guess that reflects a conservative mindset concerning water and electrical components.
March 28, 2007 4:04:14 PM

As a new H2O user you should consider a kit like they used on Tom's. I think the one they used is about a $250-300 job if I where to guess based on other Koolance units I have seen. Its a good performing unit but not designed for Max performance as noted by the small OC on the E4300 they used.

My first unit was a Thermaltake Aquarius II kit similar to the Koolance with everything contained inside the external case and only the hoses routed to PC case. It was very easy to assemble and move around. Cons are that it was not a great performer, small reservoir, hosing, pump, radiator. It worked find on my old Athlon system but I knew it wouldn't be able to handle a faster OC'ed chip like my current model.

My current H2O is custom completely. It moves lots of water very fast, dual radiator and large reservoir 1/2 hosing. The cons, its harder to route, powering up is separate and a pain to move. If you go custom stick with quality parts, Einheim, Danger Den heatsinks but be prepared to spend lots of time getting everything setup right.

There is high quality non conductive fluid that will not short your computer if its leaks but you should still avoid leaks as the stuff is about $25/bottle.

Luck,
March 28, 2007 6:03:17 PM

Quote:
Tom's has put up a new article on water-cooling. It looks pretty cool as my next box WILL be water-cooled whenever I decide I feel like putting it together.

For all who hate fans on every component, this is the way to go.


Linkage!

I have a cheap unit, the TT Bigwater SE, which should work okay on my upcoming C2D, i've just been too lazy to install it(have had it for almost a year)on my P4 Prescott. I think it's funny that CPU's are getting cooler now, and we're now seeing W/C graphics cards coming out. Take 2 steps forward, and 3 back. :x
March 28, 2007 6:15:35 PM

Quote:
I have a cheap unit, the TT Bigwater SE, which should work okay on my upcoming C2D, i've just been too lazy to install it(have had it for almost a year)on my P4 Prescott. I think it's funny that CPU's are getting cooler now, and we're now seeing W/C graphics cards coming out. Take 2 steps forward, and 3 back. :x


I bought a watercooled graphics card last year. I like the way it dropped the computer noise and kept the card cool. Unfortunatly, it was a factory watercooling from Sapphire and doesn't allow much in the way of overclocking before it shuts down for self protection. If I watercool a card again, it will use a separate unit.
March 28, 2007 6:17:23 PM

Quote:
I have a cheap unit, the TT Bigwater SE, which should work okay on my upcoming C2D, i've just been too lazy to install it(have had it for almost a year)on my P4 Prescott. I think it's funny that CPU's are getting cooler now, and we're now seeing W/C graphics cards coming out. Take 2 steps forward, and 3 back. :x


If it can handle a P4 it will take care of your C2D.

I thought of H2O'ing my Video cards but what a hassle and expensive. First you have to rip off the existing heatsinks off the chip which void the lifetime warranty. Then put on the coolers which going from one to another and back to the pump is delicate manuevering. Finally all reviews I've read on this show it only yields slight performance increases if you overclock but the temps go down around 15c which is not bad.

Overall the hassle/expensive outweigh the benefits I concluded.
March 28, 2007 6:56:36 PM

Quote:
I have to turn up my TV cause my 4400+/7800GT OC/ PSU make so much noise it nearly covers up my TV.

Water-cooling is a good thing.

DOWN WITH LOUD FANS!!


I'm considering water cooling for my next build as well. The case I bought is a ThermalTake Eureka that has an extra large interior and holes predrilled in the case for water tubes. Even if I stick with air cooling, I figure the larger case interior should help a bit for temperatures. This will take much thought, but I have a couple months before the build, so am in no hurry.

One of my computers is running a 4400+ with a 7800 GTX and I well agree, the case fan noise if loud. Have to turn up the sound system, TV, or talk loudly to overcome it. Have considered going to larger, slower running fans. I'm still unsure about water cooling. Guess that reflects a conservative mindset concerning water and electrical components.


Tell me about it. That 7800GT is LOUD, LOUD, LOUD. The 4400+ fan is also like a vacuum cleaner. That's another reason I held off on QFX. I don't want more noise I want less.

It will also make it easier to OC if I decide to.
March 28, 2007 7:38:46 PM

I have a E6600 water cooled with a EVGA 7950 GT KO Superclocked that has its own HSF. It definitely is quieter than my past Pentium 4 burger cooker HSF with my ATI X1600 PRO.
March 28, 2007 7:53:57 PM

Quote:
I have a E6600 water cooled with a EVGA 7950 GT KO Superclocked that has its own HSF. It definitely is quieter than my past Pentium 4 burger cooker HSF with my ATI X1600 PRO.



Yeah, I'm going "fanless" totally. he GPU is even worse than the CPU. I'm getting one of those heat pipe mobos and deckign it out aqua style. I'm jst trying to decide if I want an integrated case as I don't need it to handle heavy OCing, just keep my box QUIET - or at least much quieter than they have been.
March 29, 2007 3:34:50 PM

Quote:
Tom's has put up a new article on water-cooling. It looks pretty cool as my next box WILL be water-cooled whenever I decide I feel like putting it together.

For all who hate fans on every component, this is the way to go.


Linkage!

Nice thread and pretty leveled poll. I think to try water cooling on my next build (nothing lower than a K10 quad) because making noise compromises with cooling fans is getting on my nerves.
March 29, 2007 4:07:52 PM

I don't think I can go totally fanless. The Raptor needs a fan to keep its cool.
March 29, 2007 4:22:27 PM

Quote:
I don't think I can go totally fanless. The Raptor needs a fan to keep its cool.



They do have water blocks for HDDs, but then good cases do have 120mm front vents so you can get a slower fan.
March 29, 2007 4:57:54 PM

Quote:
I don't think I can go totally fanless. The Raptor needs a fan to keep its cool.



They do have water blocks for HDDs, but then good cases do have 120mm front vents so you can get a slower fan.

The new case that I bought, a Thermaltake Eureka, has two 120mm fans, one that blows over the hard drive and one that exits the rear.
March 29, 2007 5:06:39 PM

Quote:
I don't think I can go totally fanless. The Raptor needs a fan to keep its cool.



They do have water blocks for HDDs, but then good cases do have 120mm front vents so you can get a slower fan.

The new case that I bought, a Thermaltake Eureka, has two 120mm fans, one that blows over the hard drive and one that exits the rear.Yeah, for a HD, you only need minimal airflow. The quietest 120mm/92mm/80mm fan will be plenty. :wink:
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