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DaNews: Sun & AMD, Gigabyte quits, Intel Confrims China

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  • CPUs
  • Servers
  • AMD
  • Gigabyte
  • Netra
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March 28, 2007 3:40:10 PM

In our first bit of news, its some good news for the beleaguered AMD;
Quote:
Today Sun Microsystems introduced the Netra X4200 M2 server, the company’s first Network Equipment Building Standard (NEBS) Level 3 Certified Rack Server powered by the one or two dual-core AMD Opteron processors. Based on the Sun Fire X4200 M2 server announced in October 2006, the Netra X4200 M2 server is Sun's first Netra rackmount server developed with industry-standard x64 (x86, 64-bit) architecture.

The Netra X4200 M2 supports a wide array of operating systems, including the Solaris 10 OS, Red Hat and SUSE Linux, and Windows. Sun says that the Netra X4200 M2 server can be used to create solutions such as media servers, voice over IP, signaling gateway controllers, element management systems, network traffic analysis systems, operation management systems and data management systems. Siemens Networks is deploying Netra X4200 M2 servers to run its VoIP applications.

Linkage #1

The Gigabyte - Asus alliance is officially over;
Quote:

This week during a press conference in Taiwan the joint venture between ASUS and Gigabyte was officially dissolved. Both companies this week announced that the partnership in Gigabyte United was no longer, and while the branding and company would still be there, the two companies would no longer keep the partnership. DailyTech had the opportunity to sit down with Tomas Lee, marketing manager for Gigabyte, and ask a few questions concerning the direction and future of Gigabyte United.

According to Lee, many thought that ASUS was the one that pulled out of the partnership, but in fact it was Gigabyte that decided to call off the partnership. "ASUS really wanted this alliance but it's us that's pulling out. I think ultimately this will benefit Gigabyte in the long run," said Lee. It appears that Gigabyte analyzed its situation in the partnership, and came to the conclusion its stock would be affected negatively and that its motherboard and VGA business would have long term drawbacks with a 49% ownership by ASUS. "Gigabyte would have 49% less revenue from motherboard and VGA sales. For the amount that ASUS invested in, it didn't seem justified," said Lee.

Linkage #2

And Intel confirms that it will be manufacturing 300nm wafers in China. I believe we had a thread stating that the US government was blocking such. Well apperantly, something changed.
Quote:
Intel officially announced that its newest China facility will be called Fab 68. Located in the northeast region of China in the province of Liaoning, Fab 68 will be a full 300mm wafer facility. Intel also indicated Fab 68 will be its first 300mm in China and expects the investment to yield the possibility of further facilities down the road in the region.

"We welcome Intel and other multinational companies to invest and cooperate with China," said Zhang Xiaoqing, vice chairman of the National Development and Reform Commission.

When Fab 68 is operational, it will be Intel's eighth 300mm wafer manufacturing plant around the world. Intel currently has a number of fabs located in the U.S., Ireland and Israel. Intel stated however that it believes China will play a significant role down a few years from now, both for consumers and manufacturers. The facility will begin its first production wafers in 2010.

"China is our fastest-growing major market and we believe it's critical that we invest in markets that will provide for future growth to better serve our customers," said CEO Paul Otellini.

At the same time as the erection of Fab 68, Intel announced earlier this year that it would be closing a number of its facilities in Israel that focus on NOR flash memory products. Intel expects it will spend a total of $2.5 billion USD to fully construct and get Fab 68 to its full capacity.

Linkage #3

From my screen to yours, its DaNews. Now bring on the one starers. :p 

More about : danews sun amd gigabyte quits intel confrims china

March 28, 2007 3:59:46 PM

Anyone in the networking world should know that the NEBS3 chassis is immensely popular. These chassis are much smaller and compact than a traditional layout. This is an interesting niche for AMD and SUN to be involved in.

Im still adamantly opposed to the export of tech from the US to other countries, especially those like China that continually butt heads with export laws and don't follow the rules and regulations that are set forth by the international community. The US is rapidly becoming a worthless service economy and we really need to hold onto the few manufacturing jobs we have left. Not to rag on Intel or anything as I'm sure other companies have been eyeballing this idea for quite some time.
March 28, 2007 4:07:00 PM

That first story is just another win for AMD. Acer also jst announced Socket F systems that I'm sure are going to feature K10. IBM also recntly said that Power 7 will slot into 1207+.

Gateway also recently said they were selling an Opteron blade. AMD has nothing but wins with Opteron and nothing but problems being taken as a serius CPU/platform company.

I'm sure K10 will only change it slightly and if Penryn overtakes we're then waiting for Shanghai.

It's amazng how wthnews like this peple think AMD needs equity help. No one beleives anything they say for sme reason and this after Opteron X2, Dell, Lenovo, etc.
March 28, 2007 4:37:05 PM

This news while favorable for AMD doesn't solve any equity problem AMD has. This is a smart play by Sun to be able to use Barclona if it shows up and overtakes Core2Duo performance.
March 28, 2007 4:58:50 PM

Quote:


Im still adamantly opposed to the export of tech from the US to other countries...


Ditto! We should keep all the computers for ourselves! No one else from any other country should have access to anything beyond an abacus! :roll:
March 28, 2007 5:14:22 PM

Quote:
Im still adamantly opposed to the export of tech from the US to other countries, especially those like China that continually butt heads with export laws and don't follow the rules and regulations that are set forth by the international community.


You mean like the US? The US rarely follows international conventions on trade laws and regulations.
March 28, 2007 5:23:03 PM

Now lets not make this a US vs the world pissing match.

@Baron
AMD needs all the help it can get. Sun is a traditionally AMD based corp, if I can remember correctly so this is basically like Sun reaffirming their stand with AMD.
March 28, 2007 5:27:03 PM

You're right, my bad... It was grossly over-exaggerated as well.

What I was really trying to say is that, protectionism will not work well for the US. Quite simply, you (and us), need access to these sorts of markets to stimulate the economy.

It's quite natural for Intel to have a plant in China.
March 28, 2007 5:46:19 PM

haha, yeah
March 28, 2007 5:55:08 PM

Quote:
Now lets not make this a US vs the world pissing match.

@Baron
AMD needs all the help it can get. Sun is a traditionally AMD based corp, if I can remember correctly so this is basically like Sun reaffirming their stand with AMD.


Why do they need all the help they can get? If they hav ethe cash to last, the premium they WILL charge for K10 will quickly dig them out.

The price war just enabled them to release at a higher price.
March 28, 2007 5:58:14 PM

Quote:
Now lets not make this a US vs the world pissing match.

@Baron
AMD needs all the help it can get. Sun is a traditionally AMD based corp, if I can remember correctly so this is basically like Sun reaffirming their stand with AMD.


Why do they need all the help they can get? If they hav ethe cash to last, the premium they WILL charge for K10 will quickly dig them out.

The price war just enabled them to release at a higher price.

If they charge too much of a premium and the performance isn't what they're touting it to be they won't sell as many as you'd like to believe.
March 28, 2007 6:14:21 PM

Quote:
Ditto! We should keep all the computers for ourselves! No one else from any other country should have access to anything beyond an abacus! :roll:

You do realize you look like a complete moron when you say stuff like this. Your point is absolutely foolish as chips are exported on a daily basis. I believe Chinas CPU market is currently running on a better than 90% Intel margin.

Quote:
What I was really trying to say is that, protectionism will not work well for the US. Quite simply, you (and us), need access to these sorts of markets to stimulate the economy.

Coming from someone outside the US your personal statements as to what the US economy should do quite frankly doesn't mean a damn thing to me.

Besides there is no shortage of outgoing PC's and CPU's to other nations, so you have all the "access" that you need. There is little need for any chip manufacturer to locate to another country as there is no direct competitor in the market. Perhaps when the rest of the world develops a real competitor as they have done in the automobile market then the US will do whats right for OUR economy and outsource the chip market.

Until then, we developed it and we should have the benefits for all the hard work WE put into it.
March 28, 2007 6:16:01 PM

Quote:
That first story is just another win for AMD. Acer also jst announced Socket F systems that I'm sure are going to feature K10. IBM also recntly said that Power 7 will slot into 1207+.

Gateway also recently said they were selling an Opteron blade. AMD has nothing but wins with Opteron and nothing but problems being taken as a serius CPU/platform company.

I'm sure K10 will only change it slightly and if Penryn overtakes we're then waiting for Shanghai.

It's amazng how wthnews like this peple think AMD needs equity help. No one beleives anything they say for sme reason and this after Opteron X2, Dell, Lenovo, etc.
I don't think that's totally true. Most people in the know,realize that Opterons do very well in server, but AMD's biggest challenge lies in DT and Mobile.
March 28, 2007 6:22:13 PM

Quote:

Coming from someone outside the US your personal statements quite frankly don't mean a damn thing to me.

Besides there is no shortage of outgoing PC's and CPU's to other nations, so you have all the "access" that you need. There is little need for any chip manufacturer to locate to another country as there is no direct competitor in the market. Perhaps when the rest of the world develops a real competitor as they have done in the automobile market then the US will do whats right for OUR economy and outsource the chip market.

Until then, we developed it and we should have the benefits for all the hard work WE put into it.


It wasn't a personal statement, it was a statement of fact.

And.... maybe you should do some research before you spout crap. YOUR market is intertwined with the rest of the world. Read up on NAFTA and the WTO, along with other trade agreements that the US has signed.

The reason Intel will build a plant in China is not to usurp any competitor, but rather to have a presence in an emerging market. A market, I might add, that will out pace the North American market very soon.
March 28, 2007 6:26:59 PM

Quote:
Now lets not make this a US vs the world pissing match.

@Baron
AMD needs all the help it can get. Sun is a traditionally AMD based corp, if I can remember correctly so this is basically like Sun reaffirming their stand with AMD.


Why do they need all the help they can get? If they hav ethe cash to last, the premium they WILL charge for K10 will quickly dig them out.

The price war just enabled them to release at a higher price.

If they charge too much of a premium and the performance isn't what they're touting it to be they won't sell as many as you'd like to believe.

In one of the interviews with Hector he stated "the price of original Dual Core Opteron."
March 28, 2007 6:27:06 PM

Quote:
Sun is a traditionally AMD based corp, if I can remember correctly so this is basically like Sun reaffirming their stand with AMD.

I thought Sun was traditionally a SPARC company. :p 

If I remember correctly, and Im sure someone will, I think Sun only recently made the jump to AMD just a few years ago when old badge number 1 took control of the company again.
March 28, 2007 6:29:59 PM

Quote:
That first story is just another win for AMD. Acer also jst announced Socket F systems that I'm sure are going to feature K10. IBM also recntly said that Power 7 will slot into 1207+.

Gateway also recently said they were selling an Opteron blade. AMD has nothing but wins with Opteron and nothing but problems being taken as a serius CPU/platform company.

I'm sure K10 will only change it slightly and if Penryn overtakes we're then waiting for Shanghai.

It's amazng how wthnews like this peple think AMD needs equity help. No one beleives anything they say for sme reason and this after Opteron X2, Dell, Lenovo, etc.
I don't think that's totally true. Most people in the know,realize that Opterons do very well in server, but AMD's biggest challenge lies in DT and Mobile.

My point is why are they so "screwed" when Opteron is the darling? Opterons still demand a premium for mission critical servers and X2 still runs games as fast as they did before Core 2 and now they are 50% or more cheaper. Seems like someone will get a much better deal than I did.


Hector's motto should be "Don't Worry, Be Happy."
March 28, 2007 6:36:53 PM

Quote:
And.... maybe you should do some research before you spout crap. YOUR market is intertwined with the rest of the world. Read up on NAFTA and the WTO, along with other trade agreements that the US has signed.

The reason Intel will build a plant in China is not to usurp any competitor, but rather to have a presence in an emerging market. A market, I might add, that will out pace the North American market very soon.

What the hell does NAFTA and WTO have to do with outsourcing chip manufacturing plants? I think you need to read-up yourself.

I've read enough about this supposed Chinese market explosion for quite some time and to date it just hasnt happened. Sorry but the government of China isnt very keen on capitalism and although they are moving to this point the Chinese government is doing everything in its power to make sure the road is a very long one.

China has some serious issues that it needs to be resolve before it can become a global leader. Like the 2 millions deaths it averages a year. And the fact that other than the coast line of China the vast internal sections of China are filled with extremely poor and a backward society.
March 28, 2007 6:53:00 PM

So you're fine with them selling the chips to China, you just want them manufactured in the US?

What about all the other Intel plants around the world, and the all the international scientists that develop the technology?

Or is it just a anti-China thing?
March 28, 2007 7:01:17 PM

I have no problems with Ireland/Israel/Germany producing chips. Neither would I be opposed to a manufacturing plant in say Canada or other European nations. We have good working relations with those nations and the likelyhood of the said exported technology coming back to bite us in the ass by way of improved guidance system on a nuclear missle or other military devices is minimal with those nations.

This has more to do with societal issues that need to be addressed. If those were addressed and China actually became a more open society, prosecuted crimes against other nations by its own citizens, and ended the Socialist propaganda like the people of their nation so desperately want their government to do, then I wouldn't have any problem with a Chinese plant.

*Edit
This isnt an Anti-China thing. I do lots of programming and work with a lot of people of Chinese decent. Even they agree with me on these social issues. Although they still want the chip plant :lol: 
March 28, 2007 7:09:35 PM

I can appreciate your stance on this. It boils down to advanced technology falling into the wrong hands. However, I doubt that the level of technology used in the Chinese plant would be beyond their capabilities anyhow.

Intel is a publicly traded company that has to invest in new markets in order to please the investors.
March 28, 2007 7:20:18 PM

Quote:
I have no problems with Ireland/Israel/Germany producing chips. Neither would I be opposed to a manufacturing plant in say Canada or other European nations. We have good working relations with those nations and the likelyhood of the said exported technology coming back to bite us in the ass by way of improved guidance system on a nuclear missle or other military devices is minimal with those nations.

This has more to do with societal issues that need to be addressed. If those were addressed and China actually became a more open society, prosecuted crimes against other nations by its own citizens, and ended the Socialist propaganda like the people of their nation so desperately want their government to do, then I wouldn't have any problem with a Chinese plant.


And production plants get China what? Apart from saving intel shipping costs and allowing cheap access to labor, China is not gaining engineering expertise in next generation chip design because the service part of the industry (design) is still located here. China can buy millions of intel processors on the open market and design all kinds of guidance systems. Having a fab won't help them in that regard. Incidentally, you should be much more worried about the PS3 being built in China, because it is capable of 20x improvement in CFD calculations over typical CPUs, and that is what is needed to model nuclear blasts and stealth effectiveness among other things.

I want my nation to stop spouting propaganda too, but I don't see anyone trying to kick intel out of the US. If you're worried about exported technology, worry about Chinese government operatives purchasing US military equipment from Uncle Sam then sending it back to China to reverse engineer it.

You argue for protectionism and against 'the loss of manufacturing jobs', then claim you're really worried about national security, then about the spread of red communism. Which is it?
March 28, 2007 7:32:38 PM

Give a man a fish and he survives for a day. Teach a man to fish and he's set for life.

Selling them a CPU and watching as they toil over reverse engineering it versus teaching them how to build an efficient 90nm CPU that completely obliterates anything they have manufactured thus far are two completely different things.

Yet again, selling off old equipment versus teaching them how to make it are entirely different animals.

To answer your last question... Both. Simplicity doesn't fit this situation.
March 28, 2007 7:47:43 PM

Quote:
Sun is a traditionally AMD based corp, if I can remember correctly so this is basically like Sun reaffirming their stand with AMD.

I thought Sun was traditionally a SPARC company. :p 

If I remember correctly, and Im sure someone will, I think Sun only recently made the jump to AMD just a few years ago when old badge number 1 took control of the company again.
I stand corrected. Thanks.
March 28, 2007 8:49:09 PM

Interesting post. Thanks for the news man.
!