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advice on a tri mode phone?

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Anonymous
December 28, 2004 4:57:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

I'm pretty sure I'll be switching from Verizon to Cingular and was
advised to get a tri mode phone because I can't seem to get reception
in my own house. I also need a phone that can be used as a modem with
my laptop (mobile office kit must be available)
Any advice or experiences with Cingular's phones as to what my best bet
would be?

Thanks in advance,

Monica

More about : advice tri mode phone

Anonymous
December 28, 2004 9:12:03 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

I guess I really don't fully understand the technology and the people
at Verizon have told me so many untruths I don't even ask
anymore...which is why I want a new carrier. I don't know what GAIT is.
I'm confused as to why a phone that works with 4 bands is available and
not one with three. I was just told that I need to be able to get
analog because the signal is stronger.
Let me stress that I don't need cameras, video, bluetooth or anything
fancy at all. Speakerphone would be nice but not necessary. Color
screen not even a necessity. Speed when connecting to my laptop is fine
being slow, I would only require it a couple of times a month and
mostly on weekends so minutes aren't an issue. I just need a reliable
phone that first and formost will actually work in my house. I've had
to stand out on my front steps for years now (2 most recent phones were
Audiovox CDM9500 and MotoT720) just so the call won't be dropped. Being
in real estate, most clients call me on my cell first thinking I am out
and about, but quite often I'm in the home office and the phone just
doesn't ring. (verizon says there is a tower very close too)

Thanks for your comments.

Monica

John Navas wrote:
> [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
>
> In <1104271053.855063.44090@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> on 28 Dec
2004
> 13:57:33 -0800, "njrealtor@rcn.com" <njrealtor@rcn.com> wrote:
>
> >I'm pretty sure I'll be switching from Verizon to Cingular and was
> >advised to get a tri mode phone because I can't seem to get
reception
> >in my own house. I also need a phone that can be used as a modem
with
> >my laptop (mobile office kit must be available)
> >Any advice or experiences with Cingular's phones as to what my best
bet
> >would be?
>
> There are no "tri-mode" GSM phones currently available. (GAIT is the
only
> such option.) What you really need is a dual-band (850 and 1900)
phone. For
> data you'll need to choose between CSD (slow, uses minutes) and
GPRS/EDGE
> (faster, charged by the byte, unlimited costs $20/mo). Arguably the
best bet
> at the moment is the quad-band (includes non-US frequencies)
EDGE-capable
> Motorola V551.
>
> --
> Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
> John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular&gt;
December 28, 2004 10:49:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

verizon has dual and single and tri mode phones, that means they have AMPS,
TDMA and CDMA, they do not use GSM.
cingular has GSM phones.. GSM works on bands, 850, 900, 1800 and 1900..
cingular uses 850 and 1900.
most tri-BAND gsm phones are 900, 1800, and 1900 leaving off the 850mhz.
most areas this is ok, but you will not get the best signal everywhere.. you
are looking for a dual-BAND 850, 1900 or a guad-BAND 850, 900, 1800, 1900
phone..

so far the best phone for what your looking for, getting online with your
laptop would have EDGE.. IE highspeed internet..
only 2 phones popular for cingular that has edge is the nokia 6230b and the
motorola v551.

the nokia is a tri-band phone and the motorola is a quad-band phone..
they both have their differences, you can search for the specs and check
them out.

you would want to get the unlimited gprs package and use edge for highspeed
interenet.

<njrealtor@rcn.com> wrote in message
news:1104286323.820709.320530@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> I guess I really don't fully understand the technology and the people
> at Verizon have told me so many untruths I don't even ask
> anymore...which is why I want a new carrier. I don't know what GAIT is.
> I'm confused as to why a phone that works with 4 bands is available and
> not one with three. I was just told that I need to be able to get
> analog because the signal is stronger.
> Let me stress that I don't need cameras, video, bluetooth or anything
> fancy at all. Speakerphone would be nice but not necessary. Color
> screen not even a necessity. Speed when connecting to my laptop is fine
> being slow, I would only require it a couple of times a month and
> mostly on weekends so minutes aren't an issue. I just need a reliable
> phone that first and formost will actually work in my house. I've had
> to stand out on my front steps for years now (2 most recent phones were
> Audiovox CDM9500 and MotoT720) just so the call won't be dropped. Being
> in real estate, most clients call me on my cell first thinking I am out
> and about, but quite often I'm in the home office and the phone just
> doesn't ring. (verizon says there is a tower very close too)
>
> Thanks for your comments.
>
> Monica
>
> John Navas wrote:
> > [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
> >
> > In <1104271053.855063.44090@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> on 28 Dec
> 2004
> > 13:57:33 -0800, "njrealtor@rcn.com" <njrealtor@rcn.com> wrote:
> >
> > >I'm pretty sure I'll be switching from Verizon to Cingular and was
> > >advised to get a tri mode phone because I can't seem to get
> reception
> > >in my own house. I also need a phone that can be used as a modem
> with
> > >my laptop (mobile office kit must be available)
> > >Any advice or experiences with Cingular's phones as to what my best
> bet
> > >would be?
> >
> > There are no "tri-mode" GSM phones currently available. (GAIT is the
> only
> > such option.) What you really need is a dual-band (850 and 1900)
> phone. For
> > data you'll need to choose between CSD (slow, uses minutes) and
> GPRS/EDGE
> > (faster, charged by the byte, unlimited costs $20/mo). Arguably the
> best bet
> > at the moment is the quad-band (includes non-US frequencies)
> EDGE-capable
> > Motorola V551.
> >
> > --
> > Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
> > John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular&gt;
>
Related resources
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 1:40:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

[POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

In <1104271053.855063.44090@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> on 28 Dec 2004
13:57:33 -0800, "njrealtor@rcn.com" <njrealtor@rcn.com> wrote:

>I'm pretty sure I'll be switching from Verizon to Cingular and was
>advised to get a tri mode phone because I can't seem to get reception
>in my own house. I also need a phone that can be used as a modem with
>my laptop (mobile office kit must be available)
>Any advice or experiences with Cingular's phones as to what my best bet
>would be?

There are no "tri-mode" GSM phones currently available. (GAIT is the only
such option.) What you really need is a dual-band (850 and 1900) phone. For
data you'll need to choose between CSD (slow, uses minutes) and GPRS/EDGE
(faster, charged by the byte, unlimited costs $20/mo). Arguably the best bet
at the moment is the quad-band (includes non-US frequencies) EDGE-capable
Motorola V551.

--
Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular&gt;
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 4:02:06 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

>verizon has dual and single and tri mode phones, that means they have AMPS,
>TDMA and CDMA, they do not

Verizon has absolutly NO TDMA handsets nor TDMA service.

Once again - If you don't know what you are talking about don't talk. It is
always better to let people think you are an idiot than to open your mouth and
prove it.

--
John S.
e-mail responses to - john at kiana dot net
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 7:01:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <uYCdnfMmw--ztU_cRVn-hw@comcast.com>, aarons6@hotmail.com
says...
> cingular uses 850 and 1900.
> most tri-BAND gsm phones are 900, 1800, and 1900 leaving off the 850mhz.
> most areas this is ok, but you will not get the best signal everywhere.. you
>
>
Ok in most areas? No. Cingular and AT&T use 850 in the areas that
converted from TDMA to GSM--I'm fairly sure that's a larger area than
the old 1900 PCS areas--plus all the smaller carriers that will be
converting from TDMA to GSM will be on 850 also. Best signal? In areas
where both Cingular and AT&T converted, such as here, if you don't have
850 you won't have ANY signal (without roaming on T-Mobile). Getting a
GSM phone that doesn't have both 850 and 1900 for use in the US would be
a huge mistake.
--
Jud
Dallas TX USA
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 8:18:07 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <1104286323.820709.320530@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
njrealtor@rcn.com says...
> anymore...which is why I want a new carrier. I don't know what GAIT is.

GAIT phones have all the technologies that Cingular uses--GSM850,
GSM1900, TDMA850, and AMPS. They were built for Cingular to help
customers "transition" from TDMA to GSM during their conversion, when
one Cingular area might be TDMA with others GSM. Cingular considers
that conversion over so they no longer offer the GAIT phones--a mistake
IMHO since many if not most of their roaming partners HAVE NOT converted
from TDMA yet--so I'll be hanging onto mine for awhile. There were only
2 models--the Nokia 6340i and the Sony Ericsson T62u--neither of which
had all the bells and whistles of current GSM phones. (There was
actually a 6340 without the "i" which didn't have the 850mhz Cingular
needs--someone probably lost their job over that one.)

> I'm confused as to why a phone that works with 4 bands is available and
> not one with three.

Actually there ARE 3 band phones--and be carefull because some of them
will bite you. You need both 850mhz and 1900mhz for use on Cingular in
the US--basically 850 in the areas that have recently converted from
TDMA and 1900 in the areas that have been GSM from the beginning. The
Nokia 6230 Aaron mentioned has 850, 1800 and 1900mhz--that would work
fine in the US. BUT there are other 3 band phones that have 900, 1800,
and 1900--and would be a paperweight in some areas in the US. Quad-band
models solve the whole issue by having every GSM band needed anywhere.

> I was just told that I need to be able to get
> analog because the signal is stronger.

Analog is going to depend on what areas you visit. If you stick to
large cities then analog isn't going to buy you anything--those areas
have all moved to GSM. A lot of the rural areas and small towns are
still using TDMA/AMPS. My GAIT phone will use TDMA in those areas,
falling back to AMPS if there is nothing else. In the last couple of
years in Texas I don't think I've seen it use analog at all but others
from other states have reported that some rural areas still have only
analog. BUT if you don't have a GAIT phone, then a GSM+AMPS phone would
allow still allow you to roam into those non-GSM areas using analog,
whereas with a GSM-only phone you'd have no signal in those areas. That
make sense?

Verizon depends on roaming on AMPS systems when out of a CDMA area.
They'd better hurry up with an alternative such as CDMA+GSM.
AMPS/analog is supposed to stay around until 2007--at that time the rule
"sunsets" and the carriers can drop it totally if they want to. Rumor
has it that some carriers, AT&T especially, have been pulling AMPS off
towers--but that's dangerous since their license is tied to AMPS--the
FCC "could" actually pull that tower away from them. It's safer for
them to just decrease AMPS support to the bare bones.

> Speed when connecting to my laptop is fine
> being slow, I would only require it a couple of times a month and
> mostly on weekends so minutes aren't an issue. I just need a reliable

The GPRS phones Aaron mentions would give you fairly fast access but
you'd be paying by usage. If all you need is email and such then CSD is
also an option--the laptop "dials" an ISP (via cord, ir, or bluetooth)
like a landline modem and the time comes out of your minutes. It's
still available *if* you talk to the right person. Search this group
for "CSD". As a Realtor I'm surprised you don't need max speed though--
then EDGE would help. Or use a pccard with a Verizon data-only plan.
--
Jud
Dallas TX USA
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 8:24:41 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

[POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

In <MPG.1c3c91168daf09e598985d@news.dallas.sbcglobal.net> on Wed, 29 Dec 2004
16:01:26 GMT, Jud Hardcastle <l5i5changethistodash5rbo@xemaps.removethis.com>
wrote:

>In article <uYCdnfMmw--ztU_cRVn-hw@comcast.com>, aarons6@hotmail.com
>says...
>> cingular uses 850 and 1900.
>> most tri-BAND gsm phones are 900, 1800, and 1900 leaving off the 850mhz.
>> most areas this is ok, but you will not get the best signal everywhere.. you
>>
>Ok in most areas? No. Cingular and AT&T use 850 in the areas that
>converted from TDMA to GSM--I'm fairly sure that's a larger area than
>the old 1900 PCS areas--plus all the smaller carriers that will be
>converting from TDMA to GSM will be on 850 also. Best signal? In areas
>where both Cingular and AT&T converted, such as here, if you don't have
>850 you won't have ANY signal (without roaming on T-Mobile). Getting a
>GSM phone that doesn't have both 850 and 1900 for use in the US would be
>a huge mistake.

Certainly a 1900-only phone won't get as good coverage as a dual-band 850-1900
phone, but it will still work well in metro areas and along major roads thanks
to 1900 roaming agreements.

--
Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular&gt;
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 8:58:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

[POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

In <uYCdnfMmw--ztU_cRVn-hw@comcast.com> on Tue, 28 Dec 2004 19:49:20 -0800,
"Aaron" <aarons6@hotmail.com> wrote:

>verizon has dual and single and tri mode phones, that means they have AMPS,
>TDMA and CDMA, they do not use GSM.

Verizon has only single (CDMA only) and dual-mode (CDMA and AMPS) phones;
i.e., no tri-mode phones -- it does not have TDMA (IS-136). It also has the
dual-mode quad-band Samsung a790 global phone (CDMA and GSM).

>cingular has GSM phones..

Also TDMA (IS-136). Likewise ATTWS (now part of Cingular).

>GSM works on bands, 850, 900, 1800 and 1900..

Also 450. <http://www.gsacom.com/news/gsa_046.php4&gt;

>cingular uses 850 and 1900.
>most tri-BAND gsm phones are 900, 1800, and 1900 leaving off the 850mhz.

True, but there are also tri-band GSM phones with 850, 1800, and 1900; e.g.,
Sony Ericsson Z500a.

>most areas this is ok, but you will not get the best signal everywhere.. you
>are looking for a dual-BAND 850, 1900 or a guad-BAND 850, 900, 1800, 1900
>phone..

Or a tri-band 850, 1800, 1900 phone.

>so far the best phone for what your looking for, getting online with your
>laptop would have EDGE.. IE highspeed internet..
>only 2 phones popular for cingular that has edge is the nokia 6230b and the
>motorola v551.

Also Nokia 6200 and 6820, as well as Sony Ericsson Z500a.
Coming soon: Sony Ericsson S710a.

>the nokia is a tri-band phone and the motorola is a quad-band phone..
>they both have their differences, you can search for the specs and check
>them out.

Nokia 6200: EDGE Class 2 (slowest)
Nokia 6230: EDGE Class 10 (fastest available)
Nokia 6820: EDGE Class 6 (slower)
Motorola V551: EDGE Class 4 (slower)
Sony Ericsson Z500a: EDGE Class 10 (fastest available)
Sony Ericsson S710a: EDGE Class 10 (fastest available)

>you would want to get the unlimited gprs package and use edge for highspeed
>interenet.

That package is called MEdia Works, and includes lots of text and picture
messages.

><njrealtor@rcn.com> wrote in message
>news:1104286323.820709.320530@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
>> I guess I really don't fully understand the technology and the people
>> at Verizon have told me so many untruths I don't even ask
>> anymore...which is why I want a new carrier. I don't know what GAIT is.
>> I'm confused as to why a phone that works with 4 bands is available and
>> not one with three. I was just told that I need to be able to get
>> analog because the signal is stronger.
>> Let me stress that I don't need cameras, video, bluetooth or anything
>> fancy at all. Speakerphone would be nice but not necessary. Color
>> screen not even a necessity. Speed when connecting to my laptop is fine
>> being slow, I would only require it a couple of times a month and
>> mostly on weekends so minutes aren't an issue. I just need a reliable
>> phone that first and formost will actually work in my house. I've had
>> to stand out on my front steps for years now (2 most recent phones were
>> Audiovox CDM9500 and MotoT720) just so the call won't be dropped. Being
>> in real estate, most clients call me on my cell first thinking I am out
>> and about, but quite often I'm in the home office and the phone just
>> doesn't ring. (verizon says there is a tower very close too)
>>
>> Thanks for your comments.
>>
>> Monica
>>
>> John Navas wrote:
>> > [POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]
>> >
>> > In <1104271053.855063.44090@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com> on 28 Dec
>> 2004
>> > 13:57:33 -0800, "njrealtor@rcn.com" <njrealtor@rcn.com> wrote:
>> >
>> > >I'm pretty sure I'll be switching from Verizon to Cingular and was
>> > >advised to get a tri mode phone because I can't seem to get
>> reception
>> > >in my own house. I also need a phone that can be used as a modem
>> with
>> > >my laptop (mobile office kit must be available)
>> > >Any advice or experiences with Cingular's phones as to what my best
>> bet
>> > >would be?
>> >
>> > There are no "tri-mode" GSM phones currently available. (GAIT is the
>> only
>> > such option.) What you really need is a dual-band (850 and 1900)
>> phone. For
>> > data you'll need to choose between CSD (slow, uses minutes) and
>> GPRS/EDGE
>> > (faster, charged by the byte, unlimited costs $20/mo). Arguably the
>> best bet
>> > at the moment is the quad-band (includes non-US frequencies)
>> EDGE-capable
>> > Motorola V551.
>> >
>> > --
>> > Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
>> > John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular&gt;
>>
>

--
Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular&gt;
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 9:29:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

[POSTED TO alt.cellular.cingular - REPLY ON USENET PLEASE]

In <MPG.1c3ca30769ae778698985e@news.dallas.sbcglobal.net> on Wed, 29 Dec 2004
17:18:07 GMT, Jud Hardcastle <l5i5changethistodash5rbo@xemaps.removethis.com>
wrote:

>In article <1104286323.820709.320530@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com>,
>njrealtor@rcn.com says...

>> I'm confused as to why a phone that works with 4 bands is available and
>> not one with three.
>
>Actually there ARE 3 band phones--and be carefull because some of them
>will bite you. You need both 850mhz and 1900mhz for use on Cingular in
>the US--basically 850 in the areas that have recently converted from
>TDMA and 1900 in the areas that have been GSM from the beginning. The
>Nokia 6230 Aaron mentioned has 850, 1800 and 1900mhz--that would work
>fine in the US. BUT there are other 3 band phones that have 900, 1800,
>and 1900--and would be a paperweight in some areas in the US.

Tri-band 900-1800-1900 phones work well in metro areas and along major roads
thanks to GSM 1900 roaming agreements (e.g., Suncom, T-Mobile)

>Quad-band
>models solve the whole issue by having every GSM band needed anywhere.

True.

>Verizon depends on roaming on AMPS systems when out of a CDMA area.
>They'd better hurry up with an alternative such as CDMA+GSM.

Dual-mode quad-band Samsung a790 global phone (CDMA and GSM)

>> Speed when connecting to my laptop is fine
>> being slow, I would only require it a couple of times a month and
>> mostly on weekends so minutes aren't an issue. I just need a reliable
>
>The GPRS phones Aaron mentions would give you fairly fast access but
>you'd be paying by usage. ...

Unlimited usage is only $20/month.

--
Best regards, HELP FOR CINGULAR GSM & SONY ERICSSON PHONES:
John Navas <http://navasgrp.home.att.net/#Cingular&gt;
Anonymous
December 29, 2004 10:42:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <tLBAd.15206$_3.175801@typhoon.sonic.net>, spamfilter0
@navasgroup.com says...
>
> Certainly a 1900-only phone won't get as good coverage as a dual-band 850-1900
> phone, but it will still work well in metro areas and along major roads thanks
> to 1900 roaming agreements.
>
Would a Cingular GSM customer be ALLOWED to roam on another carrier
(TMobile etc) *IF* Cingular has native GSM coverage in the same area
albeit on another band? You're probably right--seems like that would be
no different roaming-agreement-wise than my old Cingular TDMA/AMPS-only
phone roaming on another TDMA carrier in a Cingular GSM area. Still
better to avoid the problem in the first place and get a phone with both
bands.
--
Jud
Dallas TX USA
Anonymous
December 30, 2004 7:52:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

> Verizon has absolutly NO TDMA handsets nor TDMA service.
>
> Once again - If you don't know what you are talking about don't talk. It
> is
> always better to let people think you are an idiot than to open your mouth
> and
> prove it.
______________________________________________

Not the original "idiot," but wondering what the three modes are on my
Audiovox CDM 9500 - used on Verizon?

Just curious. Imagine it has something to do old networks or roaming - eh?

ds
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 2:07:52 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

DFS wrote:
>>Verizon has absolutly NO TDMA handsets nor TDMA service.
>>
>>Once again - If you don't know what you are talking about don't talk. It
>>is
>>always better to let people think you are an idiot than to open your mouth
>>and
>>prove it.
>
> ______________________________________________
>
> Not the original "idiot," but wondering what the three modes are on my
> Audiovox CDM 9500 - used on Verizon?

Verizon's tri-mode phones support AMPS 800 (the original mobile network
standard in the United States) and CDMA 800 / CDMA 1900. Verizon's
current phones that are not tri-mode support CDMA 800 and CDMA 1900.

Cingular (and AT&T) also had tri-mode phones, only they used TDMA
instead of CDMA. AFAIK there were no dual-band TDMA phones, but there
were phones that supported TDMA and GSM (some also had AMPS support, but
some did not).

> Just curious. Imagine it has something to do old networks or roaming - eh?

Old networks: yes.
Anonymous
December 31, 2004 2:07:53 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

In article <41D48A4D.8020800@example.net>,
Tropical Haven <user@example.net> wrote:

> DFS wrote:
> >>Verizon has absolutly NO TDMA handsets nor TDMA service.
> >>
> >>Once again - If you don't know what you are talking about don't talk. It
> >>is
> >>always better to let people think you are an idiot than to open your mouth
> >>and
> >>prove it.
> >
> > ______________________________________________
> >
> > Not the original "idiot," but wondering what the three modes are on my
> > Audiovox CDM 9500 - used on Verizon?
>
> Verizon's tri-mode phones support AMPS 800 (the original mobile network
> standard in the United States) and CDMA 800 / CDMA 1900. Verizon's
> current phones that are not tri-mode support CDMA 800 and CDMA 1900.
>
> Cingular (and AT&T) also had tri-mode phones, only they used TDMA
> instead of CDMA. AFAIK there were no dual-band TDMA phones, but there
> were phones that supported TDMA and GSM (some also had AMPS support, but
> some did not).
>

Cingular and ATT sold Tri-Band GSM phones in their GSM service areas.
What kind of tri-band TDMA phones did they sell?
Anonymous
January 1, 2005 3:56:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.cingular (More info?)

>>Verizon's tri-mode phones support AMPS 800 (the original mobile network
>>standard in the United States) and CDMA 800 / CDMA 1900. Verizon's
>>current phones that are not tri-mode support CDMA 800 and CDMA 1900.
>>
>>Cingular (and AT&T) also had tri-mode phones, only they used TDMA
>>instead of CDMA. AFAIK there were no dual-band TDMA phones, but there
>>were phones that supported TDMA and GSM (some also had AMPS support, but
>>some did not).
>>
>
>
> Cingular and ATT sold Tri-Band GSM phones in their GSM service areas.
> What kind of tri-band TDMA phones did they sell?

Tri-*band* GSM phones are referring to the frequencies used. For
example, three frequency *bands* on a tri-band could be 850/1800/1900
mHz, or 900/1800/1900 mHz. Many phones are dual-band and operate at
850/1900. There are also quad-band phones that operate at
850/900/1800/1900. I also know of single-band phones that operate only
at 900. Likewise with 1900.

Tri-*mode* phones are actualy dual-band phones (800 / 1900 mHz) with two
modes (AMPS and TDMA). However, because AMPS never operated at 1900 mHz
in the United States, the phones would not work with AMPS 1900 which is
theoretically possible. Therefore, each "mode" (AMPS 800 + TDMA 800 +
TDMA 1900) consitutes a frequency/technology combination.

Both Cingular and AT&T Wireless offered phones that are referred to as
GAIT phones. These phones worked with TDMA and GSM, and some with AMPS
analog. The most popular were the Sony Ericsson T62u and Nokia 6340i,
that worked with AMPS 800/TDMA 800/TDMA 1900/GSM 850/GSM 1900. *If* the
naming scheme were consistent, these would probably be "quint-mode" phones.

I hope this cleared the confusion.

I think it would have been beneficial to create phones that would work
with GSM (850/900/1800/1900) and TDMA (800/1900) and even AMPS....which
would essentially be the GAIT phone with quad-band GSM instead of
dual-band GSM. However, the resources available (chipsets, for example)
have advanced greatly in the days since GAIT was first available, and
GAIT does not seem to economically feasible to continue.
!