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Best CPU for video editing? AMD or Intel?

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March 30, 2007 5:10:11 AM

Hey guys. I need some help. I have been searching around Google for some advice on which CPU is best for video editing, but every forum link it directed me to was out of date. I figured I need some updated advice.

I use Adobe Premiere, After Effects, and Audition. It is only used for video editing nothing else. I had a dual P3 1.8 ghz total system but my motherboard died and couldn't find one( actually i found the STL2 but I couldnt find the correct power supply) So I decided to upgrade.

I am between the AMD Athlon 64 X2 4600+ or the Intel Core 2 Duo E6300? I have a budget of $300 including the motherboard. Any suggestions? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.
March 30, 2007 5:16:58 AM

The AMD Athlon X2 4600+ and the Intel Core 2 Duo E6300 are very close But in many Video Applications the Core 2 Duo's have seem to be spanking AMD

So the E6300 is a Recommendation from YO_KID37
(Would you ever consider to overclock ?)
March 30, 2007 5:10:41 PM

I'd rather not. I've never overclocked and really i'm afraid of burning the chip. My budget really wont allow it. Plus i'll be working on the machine about four hours non stop every day.
Related resources
March 30, 2007 5:41:38 PM

I'd go with the Core 2, they are fairly similar performance wise but the Core 2 has a definite known good upgrade path while the X2 isn't assured an upgrade path at all.
March 30, 2007 6:25:00 PM

I realize this isnt really what you asked, but if you can then buy a 6400 or wait till late this months when price drops come out and possibly the 6420 with 4mb of cache. The E6400 will smoke the 4600+, but the 4600+ and e 6300 will trade blows in alot of different areas. Its generally only around $25 more or so I believe. If your not OC'ing then I really do think its worth it. Note that in my Sig, I have the Xeon equivalent of the 6300!

Best,

3Ball
March 31, 2007 4:25:11 AM

what do you mean price drops?[/quote]
March 31, 2007 11:54:45 AM

Price Drops, as in In Q3(July or so) There are expected to be 266$ Quad Cores and the price of the ALlendales 4XXX SEries are supposed to hit rock bottom, On anticipation of a Bloody fight to the death With AMD's New CPU's

The one he's referring to are the ones next Month In the first Weeks of April for Core 2 Duo processors, they'll drop down a little bit in price.
March 31, 2007 4:05:56 PM

Thanks for the replies guys i really appreciate it. Any idea on the best motherboard for a core 2 duo?
March 31, 2007 4:06:58 PM

Quote:
Thanks for the replies guys i really appreciate it. Any idea on the best motherboard for a core 2 duo?


The absolute best is the 680i, not sure which manufacturer tho.

Best price/performance ratio is the Gigabyte DS3.
March 31, 2007 4:21:12 PM

I do have a price range though. 150 dollars max. thats breaking my budget to be honest but i'll beg-borrow-steal for this workstation to be up and running.
March 31, 2007 5:17:52 PM

Quote:
I do have a price range though. 150 dollars max. thats breaking my budget to be honest but i'll beg-borrow-steal for this workstation to be up and running.


Then the DS3 is DEFINETLY the motherboard for you.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

$122 and can get FSB of around 450 and has plenty of features and is very well built!
March 31, 2007 5:21:26 PM

Mike, I also work with the same programs, Production Studio CS2, 3dMax 9, etc. Have a small "farm" for rendering. 2 AMD X2 3800's and 2 E6300's all with 4 gigs and running at stock. My main system is a E6600 on an Abit AW9D-Max with 4 gig of OCZ Plat memory, running at 420 x 8. Of course my main system smokes the rest, but the 63's smoke the 38's. Done some benchmarks of my own, rendering a 30 second AE project with moving text, animated bug, 3d animated background, cc effects, etc. The 63's beat the 38's by 25 to 30% easily.
As to future proofing, the C2D's will be much better than AMD as most 775 mobos will support the new quads etc. AMD is changing their mobo requirements again.
You don't need a 680i or even a 650i chipset if you are not going to be using SLI or Crossfire. Go with either a 975 or 965 chipset mobo.
As to overclocking, most C2D mobo's have a automatic overclocking feature build in. The C2D's will overclock by 30% easily with out the need for much additional voltage, such that you get the performance of a 6600 for the price of a lower cost cpu. And you need not worry about life expectancy when overclocking at those levels.
Question for you, what video card are you using? I'm running X1900XTX with a Crossfire as the master. Three 21" monitors to work with. Thinking of going to Matrox or Quatro setup.
March 31, 2007 6:10:04 PM

core2duo are indeed faster in graphic design ( photoshop ) and video editing..
but for "coding" , the ATI and Nvidia hardware based coders are faster :o 
but not sure if they support the video formats you want o_O
March 31, 2007 6:28:57 PM

Really I'm still a student in high school and most projects I work on don't require the maximum specs. But soon i'll have to edit hours of footage.(movies) My video card would probably be the one on the motherboard. Not sure if that's a good idea, really not a computer geek. As far as overclocking goes i've never tried it, and really don't know how to do it. and I am afraid I might burn the cpu, but again I don't know the risks involved in overclocking either. Mayby there is nothing to be worried about but I wouldn't know that. Basically I'm looking for the best dual processor sytem at an affordable price.
March 31, 2007 7:27:01 PM

Mike2021, my apologies for asking a question inside your topic... but Im afraid mobo57 wont be anywhere else since he just has 3 posts :( 

Quote:
As to future proofing, the C2D's will be much better than AMD as most 775 mobos will support the new quads etc. AMD is changing their mobo requirements again.
You don't need a 680i or even a 650i chipset if you are not going to be using SLI or Crossfire. Go with either a 975 or 965 chipset mobo.

Just a little thing... 775 is the latest socket from Intel right? So this means Intel has no plans in the "close" future to change it? That's what you mean isnt it?
About chipsets Im a bit confused... since I usually buy AMDs so I just look at the socket type and that's it, but now I guess with Intel I have to take care of the chipsets...
And do chipsets matter thinking about upgrading? (Lets pretend Im buying a quad-core in 6 months, but if I have a 775 socket MoBo with a 650i chipset I wont be able to upgrade or...?).

Thanks, and Im sorry once again Mike2021 please dont hate me :( 
March 31, 2007 8:04:51 PM

Yes everything changes, after all you don't think these manufacturers want you keeping the equipment you buy and not upgrading every so often. Think Intel would be the giant they are if people didn't think a 5 year old system is a dinosaur? As to Intel's and AMD's future plans, near and far, I am not an expert, but do know a little. Intel has released quad cpu's that do run on the 775 socket and the 9XX chip set and the derivatives there of, such as the 6XX etc. This is great for people like me that can really benefit from the quad cores as I do not have to buy a new motherboard or memory. If I wanted to upgrade my X2's to quad, I'll have to buy a new motherboard and new memory. That's not to say that Intel well be producing cores that will not use the 775 socket and DDR2 memory, as a matter of fact they do plan to, but not in the near future.
Point is, if mike buys now, going Intel does have an upgrade path. AMD is much more limited, especially on his budget. While quad core Intels are rather expensive right now, once AMD releases it's mid to lower quads, you will see releases and price cuts by Intel that will put the lower quads into just about everybody's price range.
mike, as to overclocking, most of the board manufactures have some sort of automatic overclocking utility build in, whether thru the bios or included software in Windo$e. On my farm machines, the mobos for the C2D's are P5WDH Deluxe, and via the bios and the included Asus utility I can overclock to 30% automatically without any voltage changes. IMO as long as you do not raise the voltages by a significant amount, oc'ing does not appreciably reduce the life of the chip by that much as long as you keep it reasonably cool. I have a AMD Barton 2500 clocked at 3200 speed on a media center that gets daily use. Has a Thermaltake Big Typhoon cooler on it to keep it cool and quiet. Been running that way for around five years now.
Regarding video cards, yes the onboard graphics will work, but using a dedicated card is better. If your budget is low, look up the Goodwill Computer stores. i just bought a TI 4200 for Grandma's system there for 14$. That would be much better than most integrated graphics.
March 31, 2007 8:17:11 PM

Mobo, i'm not sure where you are getting your information regarding upgradability, but i'd suggest you look to other sources. I'm sorry to say, but you simply are wrong. All AMD ddr2 based systems will accept next gen cpu's, including quad core. Just as %99 of s939 based systems were compatible with dual core versions. I won't comment on Intel's upgrade path as i'm sure others can and will.
March 31, 2007 9:39:55 PM

pie, I did not say you cannot upgrade an AMD dually to a quad. I stated that I would have to. My X2's are first gener's using ddr memory, etc. As long as the mobo is a socket F or AM2, then yes there is an upgrade path. How clear and how far that will go is anybodies guess. Based on that and the current state of things, AMD's Quad FX platform, and the limitations the current set of motherboards that exist that will support the Barcelona, I think my statement is correct. For example regarding the Barcelona, there is already discussion in the wild as to the lack of support as to some of the features of the core by current mobos that cannot be addressed by a bios update.
Point is, purchasing an entry level Intel based system has two advantages right now, 1. Real world tested and mature chip set platforms. 2. Known and fully supported upgrades from dual to quad cores on a majority motherboards.
And finally, the big question is, can AMD compete on a cost/performance basis on the desktop quads? Seeing as Intel has had a headstart at recovering their development costs, I would not be surprised to see Intel get aggressive with it's pricing when AMD enters the ring. There already are rumors of the Q6600 at a 400$ or less point by year end.
March 31, 2007 10:02:45 PM

the best is intel quad core 6700exteme edition
April 1, 2007 3:42:38 AM

It's o.k minty i completely understand. Besides im actually learning off of it too. :)  A question for mobo, if i buy the ds3 motherboard, will that have the auto oc as well? and will i have to buy a better cooling system?
April 1, 2007 5:23:22 AM

If you are thinking of the Gigabyte yes to "intelligent oc" and you should for the cooling but.....
In reverse order, the C2D's run fairly cool. It's not uncommon to see 40% over clocks using the stock cooling solution. The stock HSF that comes in the retail package is decent. I rarely buy retail, prefer OEM and then get a decent after market cooling solution. But that is my choice.

The retail cooler does a decent job and you should be able to get by with it just fine. Just get some AS5 or similar, then save up your pennies for a decent cooler like a 9700 or something like that later.
As to the mobo, it does have settings for newbie over clocking and is a Very good board. One problem though, if you are working with video and need to transfer with IEE 1394 you will have to get a add-on card.

Last, save some money and don't get waste it on Ultra Low Latency Gold Plated, Fully Illuminated Hyper Cooled Plasma Etched 6400 speed memory. 5400 speed will do just fine as long as you get decent latency and good quality. My AMD's all have Patriot. Intels are all OCZ. All the Intels have 6400 but it is a waste for the slower machines, never reach that speed.
Just remember to get as much memory you can afford up to 4 gigs. Amazing how quickly AE eats up memory if you forget to purge, and even if you do, it's nothing to need over 2 gigs and amazing how fast your system goes from blazing fast to a turtle with bad feet.
April 13, 2007 5:07:16 PM

Hey guys, I'm new to this forum but I think this isn't really off-topic. I'm also looking for a system that's ideal for video editing. I'll be capturing analog video, editing, and converting. The thing is, I'm looking to buy a system off-the-shelf, although I was an avid DIY-er in a past life. The question is am I better off with a gaming-oriented pc or a workstation class?

If I look at Dell, for example, there's the XPS line I can get with E6600, 2GB RAM, 2x250MB HD RAID 0, and 256MB video card. Then there's the Precision workstation series with Xeon 5140, although graphics cards are much more expensive for same MB. I can basically get what I want in either system for a little over $2k. The workstation has much more expandability, e.g. memory, SAS HD, dual cpu.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.
April 13, 2007 5:31:10 PM

maybe you should check out the nividia quadro series of video cards? i belive they are the fx's.. i THINK those are geared more towards video editiing??? but when i think about it.. even onboard video graphics should be suitable for moderate video editing?? i dunoo just some of my rambling...
April 13, 2007 5:40:23 PM

Quote:
I have a budget of $300 including the motherboard.
Did you save some of that budget for ram, or have a seperate budget for ram? You'd want a gig or 2, and you may not be able to squeeze that in with a 300 dollar total budget. You probably need to go with a lower end AMD x2 and mobo to squeeze at least a gig of ram into that.
edit, oops. just noticed the original post date :oops:  that'll teach me to not post while still sleepy :lol: 
April 13, 2007 7:23:14 PM

The price drops I was refering to are happening on the 22nd of this month and also the 6420 should be releasing from what I here. I would get that, the E6420 with 4mb of cache and OC to 3.2ghz! it will be around $185 most likely.

Best,

3Ball
April 13, 2007 7:25:38 PM

Quote:
The price drops I was refering to are happening on the 22nd of this month and also the 6420 should be releasing from what I here. I would get that, the E6420 with 4mb of cache and OC to 3.2ghz! it will be around $185 most likely.

Best,

3Ball


The 6420 is out some people already have it their dirty* little hands!

* I have no evidence that their hands are dirty
April 13, 2007 8:16:42 PM

Quote:
Hey guys. I need some help. I have been searching around Google for some advice on which CPU is best for video editing, but every forum link it directed me to was out of date. I figured I need some updated advice.

I use Adobe Premiere, After Effects, and Audition. It is only used for video editing nothing else. I had a dual P3 1.8 ghz total system but my motherboard died and couldn't find one( actually i found the STL2 but I couldnt find the correct power supply) So I decided to upgrade.

I am between the AMD Athlon 64 X2 4600+ or the Intel Core 2 Duo E6300? I have a budget of $300 including the motherboard. Any suggestions? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.


Don't forget that you are going to have to buy new ram, PSU and if you want to use a video card you will need to buy one of those as well. The only thing that you could reuse from you old system is disk drives (hard, floppy, CD/DVD), case, and whatever PCI cards you may have.

I think you need to raise your budget somehow.

One more thing; your old system is a dual 900mhz P3 and you can't look at it in the respect of being 1.8ghz. It just does not work that way. If I was to have 2 cars that top out at 150mph, that does not make a 300mph race team.
April 13, 2007 9:11:39 PM

dwarshow, depends on the programs you will be using but if you are going to be doing serious video editing, go with the work station. A gaming comp will also work, but the w-s will be much better in the long run. Not sure what work station you are looking at, but something with a quad core, 4 gigs of memory, and a lot of storage are best. My working system has two RAID 0's, 600 gig each and 1 500 SATAII. System and program files are on one RAID. Working files are on the other, and the single is my scratch disk. I do nightly backups to an external 500 gig RAID 1.
Don't know what programs you will be using, but I would not concern your self with Windoze 64 bit.
As to the video card, a decent gaming card will do o.k., but certain programs will utilize the pro cards, like the Matrox and Nvidia pro cards.
April 13, 2007 9:46:17 PM

if you haven't thought of this already.... the video card in your old P3 system won't work in the new mobo's if it's an AGP card. You would need to get one of the ASROCK mobo's if you don't have budget to get a PCIE vid card.
April 14, 2007 3:25:49 AM

Quote:
Hey guys. I need some help. I have been searching around Google for some advice on which CPU is best for video editing, but every forum link it directed me to was out of date. I figured I need some updated advice.

I use Adobe Premiere, After Effects, and Audition. It is only used for video editing nothing else. I had a dual P3 1.8 ghz total system but my motherboard died and couldn't find one( actually i found the STL2 but I couldnt find the correct power supply) So I decided to upgrade.

I am between the AMD Athlon 64 X2 4600+ or the Intel Core 2 Duo E6300? I have a budget of $300 including the motherboard. Any suggestions? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.


What matter more in editing is RAM and HDD speed. The CPU will play as fast as data is streamed from HDD to RAM then to HDD.. Because file are usually bigger that the whole memory of the system

So, I would have a look at the Asus M2A-VM HDMI. it is 89$ US, . Then, get at least 2 gigs of RAM, and I've seen 2 gigs for about 110$. And then, the best X2 CPU you can afford for this board. If you feel to spend more, here is some suggestion. Get 2 SATA HDD and RAID0 them. I've seen 160 GB drive for 50$. RAID0 will make going thru big video file abit faster. Add a nice 500w PSU. .

This board has integrated video that is the best out there. And HDMI support will be nice if you get a higher end display panel with HDCP.. And integrated sound and LAN will make you very happy. Even if it is AMD, it will serve you very well. Because you may not be able to reuse the video card from your old computer.. 2 gigs RAM will make the editing smoother, because some memory will be used by integrated video. don't reall need more than 64 megs for editing thou.. An you won't be able to reuse your RAM too, so you have to get new one..

You'll probably need a PSU too. your old one won't have the necessary wire to connect to the newer motherboard.

You should not care about "future upgradability" as some other stated. When this computer will be obsolete, then every that exist NOW that could be put on any motherboard will be obsolete too, so a complete rebuild will be necessary anyway. Just get nice component now, for now. Later, is later and no one know about whet will be available or not.
April 14, 2007 4:37:47 AM

With all honesty Pat thanks a bunch. You totally put things into perspective. Now i have a $400 budget. Any suggestions?
April 14, 2007 5:24:09 AM

What matters most for video editing is ram and cpu speed. For video editing, HD speed has very little if anything to do with the project. As long as the HD can feed or capture data at the needed rate, and just about every HD today can do easily, there is no problem.
The need for ram is obvious, video work eats up ram. The need for CPU speed is just as necessary. 15 to 20% increase in CPU speed may not seem like a lot, but when you are rendering a 20 minute video with titles, AE's etc., you can quickly end up with a door stop for a computer for well over an hour while it renders.
April 14, 2007 11:21:16 AM

Quote:
With all honesty Pat thanks a bunch. You totally put things into perspective. Now i have a $400 budget. Any suggestions?


x2 3600+ would be a great chip for you. RAID0 some HDDs if possible. Either 1 or 2gb of RAM (i've seen in some US vendors that you can get 2gb as cheap as $110!). A cheap motherboard will do you fine as you're not overclocking.

x2 3600+ $80.
2 x 160GB HDDs $110
2gb RAM $120
Motherboard with intergrated graphics ~$80?

That is slightly over budget BUT you will have a very capable video editing machine. You can just reuse your old Case/PSU and CD drive. If you have to get a new Case and PSU you can get a really cheap one such as this:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Which is $40 for the case and a PSU.

Don't listen to the preachers on here saying "You need to spend $70 on your PSU or your computer will dieeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee", it's just a load of bullcrap. For the power requirements of your system a cheapo 400W PSU that came with the case is more than sufficient.
April 14, 2007 1:12:05 PM

Quote:
With all honesty Pat thanks a bunch. You totally put things into perspective. Now i have a $400 budget. Any suggestions?


what kind of editing you do?

You plan to reuse your HDD? And what size you have?
April 14, 2007 1:34:24 PM

Quote:


Don't listen to the preachers on here saying "You need to spend $70 on your PSU or your computer will dieeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee", it's just a load of bullcrap. For the power requirements of your system a cheapo 400W PSU that came with the case is more than sufficient.


No, not a cheapo 400w. I've seen so many cheapo PSU coming with a case to fail or cause instability. I've seen cheap PSU killing HDD. He should get a seasonic, enermax, fortron or silverstone. While 400w will be enough for basic system, it will limit a bit the possibility to upgrade the video card if he ever need.
April 14, 2007 10:54:34 PM

Quote:
dwarshow, depends on the programs you will be using but if you are going to be doing serious video editing, go with the work station. A gaming comp will also work, but the w-s will be much better in the long run. Not sure what work station you are looking at, but something with a quad core, 4 gigs of memory, and a lot of storage are best. My working system has two RAID 0's, 600 gig each and 1 500 SATAII. System and program files are on one RAID. Working files are on the other, and the single is my scratch disk. I do nightly backups to an external 500 gig RAID 1.
Don't know what programs you will be using, but I would not concern your self with Windoze 64 bit.
As to the video card, a decent gaming card will do o.k., but certain programs will utilize the pro cards, like the Matrox and Nvidia pro cards.


Thanks Mobo57. This is very helpful. I'm leaning toward the workstation with Xeon 5140. THere's the option for 18GB RAM, dual CPU, SAS HD, etc. I think in order to use more than 4GB RAM, you need 64bit OS, and I have no ideal about backward compatibility of apps.
April 15, 2007 4:30:13 AM

What editing programs are you going to be using? There is only a few that have 64 bit versions, 3ds Max etc. I have both 32 and 64 on my system. the 32 bit side is faster. Adobe does not support running it's vid products on 64X. I tried, missed up my burner drivers, could not use them in 64.
With 4 gigs of memory, the only time I ever max the physical memory is when I create a complicated scene with a large layer with frame specific effects. Then it's not uncommon to see task manager showing a meg or two of physical memory available and page file at 7 or 8 gigs. Had one 30 second shot that took almost an 90 minutes to render, even with my 6600 running at 3.4 g. I also think that the Adobe products are memory hogs.
April 15, 2007 12:45:57 PM

Quote:


Don't listen to the preachers on here saying "You need to spend $70 on your PSU or your computer will dieeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee", it's just a load of bullcrap. For the power requirements of your system a cheapo 400W PSU that came with the case is more than sufficient.


No, not a cheapo 400w. I've seen so many cheapo PSU coming with a case to fail or cause instability. I've seen cheap PSU killing HDD. He should get a seasonic, enermax, fortron or silverstone. While 400w will be enough for basic system, it will limit a bit the possibility to upgrade the video card if he ever need.

We obviously have conflicting experiences here. Every case and PSU combo i have used has always worked fine! The PSU has never died/caused instability and i've made around 30 PCs using Case + PSU combos.
April 15, 2007 2:56:35 PM

For replying to the OP for the best CPU would be a Quad Core if you have tons of money otherwise i would go with a e4300 with a gigabyte P965 board DS3 and with a good cpu fans for overclocking it to 2.5-3ghz range. If you wait a bit you can get the e6300 or e4300 with 4mb cache for about the same price. If i was you i would wait for the 4Mb cpu because you are doing Video Editing.
April 15, 2007 6:13:16 PM

Im sticking with the core 2 duo. Now i need to know the best motherboard. It's going to be either the E6300 or E6400. I don't know the best brand of ram out there but right now i have 2 667mhz 512 mb of crucial in mind. Also i have no idea what kind of power supply to buy, especially for the ds3 motherboard everybody seems to love.
April 15, 2007 6:42:42 PM

Honestly it depend, if you going to have a DS3 board then dont go with a e6300 and forget the e6400. If you plan to overclocking with those processor there is like 2% risk go with the e4300 because its been made for overclocker and you can Oc it to 3ghz and more with the DS3 Board and it outperform a Quad Core Prossesor ( really good for video encoding ) If you dont going for overclocking then take the cheapest motherboard for 775 it will do the job fine. For the ram get a 677 for non-overclocking and 800 for overclocking, there is a lots of brand but corsair is pretty good for the price, the corsair 1gb at 59$ CAD beat my OCZ Platinum Series in the benchmark and there is like 40-60$ price range, so i suggest you go check the benchmark over the net before choosing a brand of price, doesn't mean the price is high mean its the best.
April 17, 2007 1:36:20 AM

What about the e6420 chip? I like the sound of 4 mb cache.
April 17, 2007 6:37:28 AM

Quote:
What about the e6420 chip? I like the sound of 4 mb cache.


In gaming (which (i believe) is what most people looking into this kind of thing do) you will not notice any performance difference between the two. However if you buy an E4400 and put the FSB up to the same as the E6420 you would effectivly have an E6700 with 2MB cache for less than half the price.
February 6, 2009 1:35:48 PM

Pat,
I read your post and wonder if you can help suggest a good motherboard for a AMD Quad core processor that I want to use for video editing work.
Thank you
Winston
my email is: replyme@comcast.net

pat said:
Quote:
Hey guys. I need some help. I have been searching around Google for some advice on which CPU is best for video editing, but every forum link it directed me to was out of date. I figured I need some updated advice.

I use Adobe Premiere, After Effects, and Audition. It is only used for video editing nothing else. I had a dual P3 1.8 ghz total system but my motherboard died and couldn't find one( actually i found the STL2 but I couldnt find the correct power supply) So I decided to upgrade.

I am between the AMD Athlon 64 X2 4600+ or the Intel Core 2 Duo E6300? I have a budget of $300 including the motherboard. Any suggestions? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks.


What matter more in editing is RAM and HDD speed. The CPU will play as fast as data is streamed from HDD to RAM then to HDD.. Because file are usually bigger that the whole memory of the system

So, I would have a look at the Asus M2A-VM HDMI. it is 89$ US, . Then, get at least 2 gigs of RAM, and I've seen 2 gigs for about 110$. And then, the best X2 CPU you can afford for this board. If you feel to spend more, here is some suggestion. Get 2 SATA HDD and RAID0 them. I've seen 160 GB drive for 50$. RAID0 will make going thru big video file abit faster. Add a nice 500w PSU. .

This board has integrated video that is the best out there. And HDMI support will be nice if you get a higher end display panel with HDCP.. And integrated sound and LAN will make you very happy. Even if it is AMD, it will serve you very well. Because you may not be able to reuse the video card from your old computer.. 2 gigs RAM will make the editing smoother, because some memory will be used by integrated video. don't reall need more than 64 megs for editing thou.. An you won't be able to reuse your RAM too, so you have to get new one..

You'll probably need a PSU too. your old one won't have the necessary wire to connect to the newer motherboard.

You should not care about "future upgradability" as some other stated. When this computer will be obsolete, then every that exist NOW that could be put on any motherboard will be obsolete too, so a complete rebuild will be necessary anyway. Just get nice component now, for now. Later, is later and no one know about whet will be available or not.

a b à CPUs
February 7, 2009 1:27:01 AM

necro?
February 7, 2009 6:39:14 AM

amdfangirl said:
necro?


We seem to have a number of people resurrecting threads from 2 years ago today...
a b à CPUs
February 7, 2009 9:09:22 AM

threads older than 6months should be auto-locked
!