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Wires Wires Wires!!!!

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March 30, 2007 11:08:57 AM

I just got all of my stuff from newegg and I put all of the components in the case. Simple enough (that is, if I actually did it right!). Now I have like a million wires that aren't connected to anything. I'm not sure where they go to. The power supply alone has like 10 wires coming out of it. I'm guessing that most of them go to things like the floppy, cd rom, hard drive, mobo, etc. but there's no manual that came with the PSU that says where they go...

Is there a place where I can go that says exactly where all of the wires go?

My comp:

Rosewill R6AS5-BK Case
Gigabyte DS3 MOBO
EVGA GeForce 7600GT
OCZ GameStream 600W PSU
E6300 C2D
G.SKILL 2GB DDR2 800
ASUS 16X DVD Burner
Windows XP Media Center Edition

... Thanks for the help!

Pots

More about : wires wires wires

March 30, 2007 11:47:32 AM

The motherboard manual has a lot of pictures and charts saying what wires needs to go where. A good PSU manual would have also, but then again Rosewell :lol: 

Otherwise look for a general DIY PC guide, it will list steps including wires that need to get hooked up.

DO NOT turn any thing on until you know where erevy wire should go and the ones that do not apply in your rig. The life you save will be your PC's 8O
March 30, 2007 12:00:04 PM

DIY PC guide... are there any of those online that I could use that you know of?
Related resources
March 30, 2007 12:24:08 PM

I think there's some good videos on youtube.
March 30, 2007 12:34:06 PM

Here's the quick rundown on what the standard wires do...

That's a 20/24 pin connector that gives most of the power to the motherboard. Only 1.
That's a 12V P4 rail, many better power supplies have 2 of these rails (AKA 12v P8). They are used to give additional power to our processors.
That is a power connector for a Serial ATA drive. Most have between 2 and 8 of these, generally 2-4 on less-expensive models.
That's a 4-pin Molex connector. It's used for legacy drives as well as a standard connection for extra power. You can use converters to change 2 Molex into 1 PCIe, 1 Molex into SATA, etc. They're useful and most have 4 to 8 of these.
That is a mini-Molex connector. It is used for floppy disk drives and sometimes other components like high-end deticated sound systems.
That is a power connector for PCIe. Many PSUs still don't have one, though anything about $40+ should have 1. SLI certified means it has 2 to 4 of these for SLIing most high-end graphics cards (the GeForce 7950GX2 and the GeForce 8800GTX both require 2 each).
March 30, 2007 12:35:14 PM

the plugs are made for murpheys law, that is all i can say :p 
the right plugs only go in the right socket (unless you force them)
March 30, 2007 1:05:18 PM



This is a banana. Be sure to keep these out of your rig :lol: 
March 30, 2007 1:09:28 PM

A couple specific questions:

1. I seem to be missing one of the F_PANEL connectors: the "message LED/Power/Sleep LED" one... is that a problem?

2. What is the difference between the "Chip Fan Power (NB_FAN)" connector and the "CPU Fan (CPU_FAN)" connector on the motherboard? Are there two connectors coming from the fan on the processor that go to both of these?

3. For the F_AUDIO connector on the mobo, where does the wire come from that goes to it? I have a sound card PCI in there right now...

4. For the CD_IN connector, do I not plug the wire from the CD-ROM drive into this since I have an "audio in" on my sound card?

5. I have three F_USB Connectors but seem to only have one USB plug. Do I just plug that one in the F_USB1 and leave the other two alone?

Thanks for the help! :lol: 
March 30, 2007 1:46:31 PM

1. Isn't really an issue, just an extra LED on your case to indicate what power-mode it's in.

2. Each connector will drive a different fan, CPU_FAN for your CPU fan (durr!) and NB_FAN for a northbridge fan (if you have one).

3. For if you have front-audio plugs on your case.

4. Don't bother with this one, a relic :wink:

5. For case USB ports, if your case only has one connector, you can only connect one up :) 
March 30, 2007 3:48:54 PM

an important word of caution:

if you are installing a SATA drive, connect only one power supply connector to the drive. some drives have the legacy connector (4 pin molex) on the hard drive and a new SATA power connector. you can kill the drive if you connect the SATA and the 4-pin molex to the drive at the same time.

I know this because I had to diagnose/fix a rig that this was done to, a new 250gb drive had to be replaced.
March 30, 2007 5:10:47 PM

Everything PseudoPeon said was correct. But I felt maybe you might appreciate a few more details in some cases so here goes ...

Quote:
1. I seem to be missing one of the F_PANEL connectors: the "message LED/Power/Sleep LED" one... is that a problem?
1. Isn't really an issue, just an extra LED on your case to indicate what power-mode it's in.
It seems some cases can provide the more complicated "message LED/Power/Sleep LED" indicator light. Your case does not. (Neither does mine ... don't know of any that do, but I guess they're out there). Just hook up the "power LED" connector and don't worry about the other.

BTW, the lights on the display are LEDs or "Light Emitting Diodes". The key word there is "diode" which is an electrical device which only allows current to flow in (essentially) one direction. Try to correctly match the polarity of the wires to the pins when you connect the LEDs or they won't work. If after you get things assembled and things are working but the power and/or hard drive lights on the case don't work, check to make sure the polarity is correct.

Quote:
2. What is the difference between the "Chip Fan Power (NB_FAN)" connector and the "CPU Fan (CPU_FAN)" connector on the motherboard? Are there two connectors coming from the fan on the processor that go to both of these?
2. Each connector will drive a different fan, CPU_FAN for your CPU fan (durr!) and NB_FAN for a northbridge fan (if you have one).
Hook the CPU fan up to the CPU_FAN connector. I assume you're using the stock heatsink/fan which came with your processor, correct? It has a 4-pin connector which will match the pins on the CPU_FAN header.

The DS3 does not come with a fan for the Northbridge (the heatsink next to the CPU), but some of us still prefer to slap a fan on top of the Northbridge. If you do, then you can connect it to the NB_FAN header. The Scythe Mini-Kaze is a popular choice. Newegg sells it for $3 but will charge you $5 to ship it. :( 

Note 1: Don't freak out if when you turn on the power your CPU fan does not spin or only does an intermittent jerky motion. The default in the DS3 BIOS for the CPU fan are to only run the fan when the detected CPU temperature is "high enough". My suggestion is to go into the BIOS when the system comes up and change the CPU fan settings to use the Intel control method rather than "legacy". If you do this then the fan will always spin at a minimum of 800 RPM.

Note 2: Also don't freak out if when you change something in the BIOS the system powers off and then on again when it reboots ... so long as it only does this once :) . Apparently it is normal. I guess in some cases the BIOS needs a complete power off in order to process changes to some of the BIOS settings.

Quote:
3. For the F_AUDIO connector on the mobo, where does the wire come from that goes to it? I have a sound card PCI in there right now...
3. For if you have front-audio plugs on your case.
It's for the integrated sound on your motherboard. There are probably also connectors on your PCI sound card for this also. I haven't even bothered to try to figure out how to hook this up yet. If you did want to connect it you'd probably need to look at the pin-out diagrams in the DS3's manual. It would be how you would connect the microphone and headphone outputs next to the USB at the base of your case.

Quote:
4. For the CD_IN connector, do I not plug the wire from the CD-ROM drive into this since I have an "audio in" on my sound card?
4. Don't bother with this one, a relic :wink:
By relic, I'm guessing PseudoP means that these days no one even bothers to connect the analog CD_OUT on your optical drive to the analog CD_IN on your sound card or, in this case, motherboard. Instead, the sound signal is extracted and passed directly to the sound subsystem in digital form.

Quote:
5. I have three F_USB Connectors but seem to only have one USB plug. Do I just plug that one in the F_USB1 and leave the other two alone?
5. For case USB ports, if your case only has one connector, you can only connect one up :) 
Yeah. I also have two unused USB connectors. I'm still looking around to try to find a (reasonably priced) way to hook those up. :roll:

According to the specs on newegg, your OCZ GameXStream OCZ600GXSSLI ATX12V 600W PSU has the connectors listed below. I tried to indicate which of them would be connected based on your components.

1 x 20+4-pin ATX Connected.
1 x 4-pin/8-pin CPU Apparently you get two 4-pin connectors. Only one of them would be connected since the DS3 motherboard only has a single 4-pin CPU power socket.
2 x PCI-Express Not connected. Your 7600GT video card doesn't use this.
6 x 4-pin peripheral Your optical drive would use one of these. What do you have (PATA or SATA?) as the hard drive(s)?
2 x 4-pin floppy It looks like you don't have anything that would use these.
6 x SATA Only used if you have one or more SATA hard drives.

I suggest buying some cable ties and tying up the unsed cables and tucking them out of the way. :) 

-john, the ostensibly clueless redundant legacy-in-transition dinosaur
(Edited just to clean up some loose ends. No significant changes. :) )
March 30, 2007 5:37:32 PM

Thanks for adding detail to my post, zjohnr :) 
Was a little short on time when I wrote it :roll:
March 30, 2007 5:56:36 PM

Quote:


This is a banana. Be sure to keep these out of your rig :lol: 


Muahahaha
March 30, 2007 5:59:42 PM

Thanks for the detailed responses!

My hard drive right now is an IDE.

You said my video card (which is PCI-E) doesn't use the PCI-Express plug from the PSU, can you explain this?

Also, once I get everything plugged in and start it up for the first time (man am I going to be nervous...), do I go directly into the BIOS? Do I start it up with the XP disk in it?

Thanks!
March 30, 2007 6:06:53 PM

Quote:
Thanks for the detailed responses!

My hard drive right now is an IDE.

You said my video card (which is PCI-E) doesn't use the PCI-Express plug from the PSU, can you explain this?

Also, once I get everything plugged in and start it up for the first time (man am I going to be nervous...), do I go directly into the BIOS? Do I start it up with the XP disk in it?

Thanks!


The 7600GT is a very power consious card and gets all of its power from teh PCIExpress x16 slot, and doesnt require extra power from a 6 pin.

Good luck
March 30, 2007 6:16:11 PM

All you need to do is pop the WinXP CD in and it should autorun at startup, then you'll be well on your way to wrestling with drivers/updates/WinXP in general! :) 
March 30, 2007 7:03:44 PM

IF YOU CANT BUILD IT, BURN IT!!
March 30, 2007 7:13:49 PM

Quote:
...
Also, once I get everything plugged in and start it up for the first time (man am I going to be nervous...), do I go directly into the BIOS?...

I would do that, just to set the time and date correctly, verify that CPU/other temps look OK (assuming your BIOS has such monitoring), make sure the HD and optical drive were detected correctly, and so forth.
March 30, 2007 8:34:31 PM

Quote:
You said my video card (which is PCI-E) doesn't use the PCI-Express plug from the PSU, can you explain this?
What's to explain about "It doesn't use it"? :)  The 7600GT (thankfully!) doesn't need huge gobs of power to run. This is a good thing, no?

Quote:
Also, once I get everything plugged in and start it up for the first time (man am I going to be nervous...), do I go directly into the BIOS? Do I start it up with the XP disk in it?

My suggestion would be to start very slow and build up gradually. By that I mean start with the bare minimum installed that you need to allow the system to boot. The processor and its HSF, 1 stick of DDR2, and the video card. (Heck, if you had an old/cheap PCI based video card laying around, I'd suggest using it rather than your 7600GT, but that's probably not an option for you).

Before you hit the power button, position a finger of one hand on the PSU rocker switch so you can kill power immediately if you see sparks, smell smoke, whatever. None of us really expect this to happen. It's just a precaution.

When the system comes up, go into the BIOS and poke around a bit to familiarize yourself with it. Also make a note of which version of the BIOS is installed. I'd also suggest changing the options for the fan so it'll run at at least 800 RPM ... tends to make most folks feel better to see the CPU fan spinning. :) 

Once you've booted with the min components and verified the CPU temps look good, you can start adding components. Me, I just swap the RAM sticks to make sure the other stick works on its own. Then I boot with both sticks. The last thing I'd do is to boot with your PATA optical and PATA hard drive connected and powered.

After you boot to the BIOS with all the components connected and verified that the BIOS is correctly recognizing your optical and hard drives, then you can boot the XP install CD, if you want. But you might also want to boot something like Memtest 86+ and run it for a bit, just as a sanity check.

You can also just boot with everything connected the first time. The approach I outlined above is probably more cautious than needed. I may be weird that way. Heck, I didn't actually get the entire system assembled into the case until almost two weeks after I got it. I spent that much time playing around with it with all the components and wires spread out on a workbench (... well, ok, folding table actually). It was that "getting to know you" phase of the relationship and I wanted to make it last. ;) 

-john, the ostensibly clueless legacy-in-transition dinosaur
March 30, 2007 8:47:45 PM

Quote:
John, an easy and cheap way to use those USB0 and USB1 ports on your mobo is something like these ...

Thanks. Yes, something like the rear USB bracket was what I was thinking of, but I was not having any luck coming up with Google search keywords which would turn up sites to buy it from in the US. Thanks for your suggestions. This will help give me ideas on what to look for.

IMO the problem when buying any of this stuff is getting it at a reasonable price once shipping is included. :roll: Oh, well ...

-john
March 30, 2007 11:32:01 PM

ok, got back from work and put a few things together thanks to you guys... it looks like I'm almost done but I have a couple last questions:

1. From my PSU I have two wires that say CPU1 and CPU2 that look like ATX 12V connectors. Where do these go?

2. I also have from my PSU a "Main" connector and a "24" connector the latter being a 12V ATX. Do I have to plug both of these into the mobo? I know where they would go on there, I just don't know if I have to plug BOTH of them in...

3. I have 1 IDE slot on my mobo and I have two IDE drives (my DVD-Burner and my IDE HD). Do I set the HD to Master and my DVD-Burner to Slave? And when I use the same cable, do I plug in the first connector to the Burner, the middle one to my hard drive and the last (blue) one to the mobo? At least that's what looks like the best way to phangle it without twisting the crapola out of the cable!

4. As for my sound card, the only thing I have plugged into it right now is the digital audio output (2 pin thin cord, looks like a jumper) from the DVD-Burner to the card. What else should be connected to the card?

I think that's it right now. I really appreciate your help!!! I'm having a lot of fun and learning a lot (even though anxiety is coarsing through my veins at the same time!)

Thanks - Pots
March 31, 2007 12:29:07 AM

I think I have the answer to #1 in my last post... I'm assuming I just use the first of these two wires and plug it into the mobo...

Still have questions on the other items though :?
March 31, 2007 1:00:32 AM

Quote:


This is a banana. Be sure to keep these out of your rig :lol: 
LMAO!!
March 31, 2007 1:30:19 AM

Check manuals, google and tech support if you have to. Make sure the wires goes the right place otherwise you pc will run backwards.
March 31, 2007 2:53:57 AM

I've checked all of the manuals and they only got me so far... I still am unsure about the questions that I had a few posts back... Any help would be awesome!!!

I also found a wire that comes from the front of the case that has a female AND male component (4 prongs for male and 4 holes for female) and have no idea where that goes...

The manual for the case really stinks. It doesn't say anything at all...
March 31, 2007 3:31:11 AM

Okay, the wires coming from the case. The important ones are the wires for the power switch and reset. It usually comes with the power light indicator and hard drive activity light indicator. This wires connects to the motherboard, these wire are color coded and sometimes tagged with the words indicating what they are for.

Okay:

Power switch wire (P.S.): usually compose of three wire, green, white, black. mostly.

Reset wire: white and black

Power light and hard drive activity indicator: black and red.

Again it's usually color coded and name tagged. The motherboard (male) connectors also may be color coded and have positive(+) and negative(-) sign indicating the wires are to be oriented.

These can also be located with the motherboard and case manuals but like so you said it's not helping.

_____________________________________________________________

PSU wires:

Main: 20 pin or 24 pin or 20+4 pin. This powers the motherboard itself. Also the motherboard may need and extra power which is provided with a molex (4-pin connector).

Molex: Also known as 4-pin connectors, very common. Same voltage as per PSU Standard. These connects to drive bays and hard drives. Also provides additional power to motherboard if needed.

PCI-E: 6-pin connectors goes for graphics card(s).

Floppy: Usually there's only one floppy connector.

These connectors cannot be mixed. So don't try to connect a molex to a graphics card or 6-pin.

Better yet give me some links on that case, motherboard and PSU.
March 31, 2007 4:40:25 AM

Quote:
...
1. From my PSU I have two wires that say CPU1 and CPU2 that look like ATX 12V connectors. Where do these go?

Some newer motherboards require an 8-pin connector which is just 2 ATX12Vs side-by-side. If your MB only has a 4-pin socket, use just one.

Quote:
...2. I also have from my PSU a "Main" connector and a "24" connector the latter being a 12V ATX.

It's important to keep terminology straight. I doubt VERY much that the 4-pin connector is an ATX12V, as I suspect it both has different wire colors and different pin "keying" than an ATX12V, and so wouldn't fit into an ATX12V socket without being forced.
As described above in the excellent post that showed diagrams of the various PS connectors, what you have is likely a 20+4 pin main power connector. The "24" part is used if you have a 24-pin motherboard connector, which you probably do. Both the 20-pin and 4-pin parts only fit one way, so don't force them.

Quote:
...3. I have 1 IDE slot on my mobo and I have two IDE drives (my DVD-Burner and my IDE HD).

This is unfortunate, as it is not a good idea to mix optical and hard drives on the same PATA/IDE cable. I'd buy a SATA version of one or both and attach the remaining drive to the PATA/IDE cable. The rule for connecting devices to the PATA/IDE cable is to connect one end of the cable to the MB connector and the other end (not middle) connector to the "main" drive. If you have an additional drive, you connect that to the middle connector.
In your case, connect the blue end to the MB, the other end to your hard drive, and the middle connector to the burner. Hopefully, it will work without problems. Go ahead and set the HD to master and the dvd to slave.
If/when you buy a SATA hard drive to replace your old one, set the DVD to "master" and put it on the end, getting rid of the PATA hard drive.
...
Quote:
... As for my sound card, the only thing I have plugged into it right now is the digital audio output (2 pin thin cord, looks like a jumper) from the DVD-Burner to the card.
I'm pretty sure you don't even need that on a modern machine (I haven't seen one in a long time); check your sound card's manual to see what (if anything) else should be connected.
March 31, 2007 5:08:22 AM

Below are my best guesses about your wiring questions ... and maybe someone else will do better than I can. Just promise to not force anything into place. All the connectors are "keyed" so you shouldn't be able to hook anything up to the wrong socket unless you force it. ;) 

Quote:
1. From my PSU I have two wires that say CPU1 and CPU2 that look like ATX 12V connectors. Where do these go?
I'm guessing those are the CPU power connectors. Some motherboards ... the DS3 being one of them ... use a 4-pin connector. Others use an 8-pin connector. My guess is that your PSU solves this problem by supplying the 8-pin connector as two separate 4-pin connectors. You only need to plug one of them into the motherboard. The socket they go into is shown on diagrams on pages 21 & 22 of the Gigabyte DS3 manual. It's the 4-pin socket just above and to the left of the CPU socket in the diagram in the manual.

Quote:
2. I also have from my PSU a "Main" connector and a "24" connector the latter being a 12V ATX. Do I have to plug both of these into the mobo?
You are talking about the connector below, correct? If so, then YES you need to connect both "pieces". All 24 pins of the motherboard power connector need to be populated.


Quote:
3. I have 1 IDE slot on my mobo and I have two IDE drives (my DVD-Burner and my IDE HD). Do I set the HD to Master and my DVD-Burner to Slave?
That should work. You could also just set them both to Cable Select (CS). When that setting is used, the device figures out whether it is a master or a slave by which connector is plugged into it.

Quote:
And when I use the same cable, do I plug in the first connector to the Burner, the middle one to my hard drive and the last (blue) one to the mobo?
Yes, the blue end connector goes to the motherboard. The other end connector is intended for the master and the middle for the slave. This is why I prefer setting the jumpers to cable select. That way you can simply hook up the connectors in whatever way is physically easiest without worrying about which is the master/slave.

Quote:
4. As for my sound card, the only thing I have plugged into it right now is the digital audio output (2 pin thin cord, looks like a jumper) from the DVD-Burner to the card. What else should be connected to the card?
Personally, I can't think of anything else. But at any rate, it's not a high priority so you can always come back to this later, no?

Quote:
I also found a wire that comes from the front of the case that has a female AND male component (4 prongs for male and 4 holes for female) and have no idea where that goes...
That sounds like it provides power to a case fan in the front of the case. It's intent is to let you power the fan without completely dedicating a 4-pin molex power connector to the fan.

-john, the ostensibly clueless redundant legacy-in-transition dinosaur
March 31, 2007 5:24:24 AM

Quote:
... it is not a good idea to mix optical and hard drives on the same PATA/IDE cable.

I doubt you'll see any performance problems from having the hard drive share the same cable as the optical except possibly when attempting to burn a DVD. I'd certainly suggest trying to do a test burn before actually risking creating a coaster with this configuration.

Quote:
I'd buy a SATA version of one or both and attach the remaining drive to the PATA/IDE cable.
Yes, you could do that. You could also spend $14 on a PATA-to-SATA converter dongle and then connect your PATA hard drive to one of the SATA ports on your DS3 motherboard. That's how 3 out of the 5 PATA drives I have hooked up in my system are connected to my DS3.

(If you're curious, the three drives using a converter are a 160GB Maxtor, a 250GB Seagate, and a 250GB Western Digital).

-john
March 31, 2007 5:43:35 AM

Get an aftermarket heatsnk for the 7600GT. Great card, probably bad heatsink. I have the VF-700 on my 7600GT, dropped temps 10C, and is really really quiet.
March 31, 2007 2:15:07 PM

Yes, if the budget is there I HIGHLY recommend a great aftermarket HSF for the 7600 like a Zalman VF-700 or VF-900. Drops temps ALOT and is absolutely quiet. Very good cooler.
March 31, 2007 2:53:50 PM

Quote:
Drops temps ALOT and is absolutely quiet. Very good cooler.

Quiet would be nice. My current biggest gripe with the 7600GT is that every now and then for reasons I can't fathom the fan slips into full speed (aka annoying) mode. It's not as though I'm doing anything video intensive when this happens ... just plain vanilla 2D web browsing or watching a video. Oh, well.

Does installing the aftermarket cooler void the eVGA warranty? Don't think I'd want to do that.

-john
March 31, 2007 3:04:20 PM

Not that I'm aware of. There's nothing "bad" involved. Simply disconnect the wire from the stock cooler to the PCB board. Then install the Zalman according to instructions.

If you every need to RMA the card or something, remove the Zalman, then use a hair dryer to heat the memory sinks so the glue is "gooey" and pull them off. Slap a drop of Arctic Silver on the GPU, put the stock cooler back on, connect the wire, and return the card ;) 
March 31, 2007 5:58:10 PM

Okay, got all of the wires connected (except for that one coming from the front of the case that has the male and female connectors...).

Can someone point me to a link where I can get a PATA to SATA converter? Would they sell that at an office place like Staples or Office Max or would I have to order it through newegg?

Also, what would be a good aftermarket heatsink fan for my graphics card (7600GT)?

Thanks again! I think I'm going to try to fire it up soon... I just hope I don't fry it up...

Pots
March 31, 2007 6:36:28 PM

Yeah, for me it was kind of hard to remove the little fan, so I just ripped off the cable. :lol: 

VF-700

VF-900

I think there's no need to go with the VF-900 in your case, but it's your money..spend it wisely. :) 
March 31, 2007 7:15:42 PM

Quote:
Can someone point me to a link where I can get a PATA to SATA converter?

Here's the PATA-to-SATA converter which I prefer. I have two of them. The current price is ~$14 shipped by USPS mail. I also have this Syba version which newegg currently sells for ~$19 shipped by UPS.

Here are some pros and cons as I see them. The main advantage of the Syba version is the plastic case it comes with. What I don't like about the Syba is that it costs a bit more but uses an older chipset, the Silicon Image SIL3611.

The $14 adapter doesn't have the plastic case so you have to be extra gentle when mounting it and attaching/removing cables. The lack of the case also means there are exposed connectors on the back of this adapter. They can be shorted out if the back of the adapter is pushed up against a metal part of a PATA device. My solution to this was to cover the back of the adapter with a piece of paper. I went with paper because it was easy to cut it to fit the area I wanted to cover. I used paper which was about the thickness of a business card. Sorta kludgy, but it has worked fine for me. :) 

While it lacks a case it uses a newer version of the chipset, Silicon Image SIL3811. (Actually it's labeled SunPlus SATA 3811, but I believe SunPlus is licensed by Silicon Image to manufacturer a copy of their SIL3811). It also comes with an adapter power cable that allows you to power both the PATA device and the adapter card using one 4-pin molex connector.

Hope that helps. If you have any other questions, feel free to ask and I'll try to answer if I can. Out of curiosity, what is the make and model of your PATA hard drive? Also, how much "free space" is there behind the PATA connector of your hard drive in your case? You'd need about an inch or so free behind the drive to allow room to plug in the adapter & the power and SATA connector cables.

-john, the ostensibly clueless redundant legacy-in-transition dinosaur
March 31, 2007 7:50:15 PM

VF-700 is good enough. Will work wonders and is QUIET. I've had both the 700 and 900.....700 is just fine.
April 1, 2007 12:00:33 AM

Very nice display. Very good info..well done.
April 1, 2007 12:14:41 AM

Thanks for all the info guys... I'm sure I'll have some questions when I get it up and running...

Till then! Much appreciative...
April 1, 2007 12:37:16 AM

L-M-A-O!!
April 2, 2007 4:35:20 PM

Just bought a SATA HD from newegg yesterday (WD 250GB 16MB Buffer 3MB). Hopefully I'll get it tomorrow. That'll solve the problem of the two IDE drives on the same cable...

How imperative is buying the extra fan for my video card? Is it in real danger of getting too hot without it? Buying the HD maxed out my budget so I'm coined out right now...

"potsofclay wrote:
I also found a wire that comes from the front of the case that has a female AND male component (4 prongs for male and 4 holes for female) and have no idea where that goes...

zjohnr wrote:
That sounds like it provides power to a case fan in the front of the case. It's intent is to let you power the fan without completely dedicating a 4-pin molex power connector to the fan."

I looked at the online manual for the case and it says that it's a front panel LED cable... Am I going to need to use that?

Thanks again...
April 2, 2007 7:54:56 PM

Quote:
How imperative is buying the extra fan for my video card? Is it in real danger of getting too hot without it?

Pots, my understanding is that the main reason to spring for the after-market video card cooling is to get something that is quieter. As an added bonus the card's GPU may also run a degree or three C cooler ... but's that's just a bene, not a need. I'm certainly not worried about my 7600GT getting overheated. But the first time the fan on your 7600 kicks into "full speed" mode ... it happens briefly every time you boot ... you'll know why people are suggesting alternatives to the stock 7600 cooling. ;) 

Of course, I said all the above assuming that you will be using the 7600GT at stock speeds. All bets are off if you decide to try to overclock your GPU. I don't know anything about video overclocking ... and don't want to. I have no need for extra video ooomph. I'd also be worried I might burn out the GPU.

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I looked at the online manual for the case and it says that it's a front panel LED cable... Am I going to need to use that?

Sorry for my ignorance with the suggestion about a possible front case fan. The "Front Panel LED" your owner's manual is talking about is apparently for a back light of the Rosewill logo and of the lower front grille. I have never owned a case which included decorative lighting so this thought never even occurred to me.

Yes, you can certainly live without hooking up the case lighting. It's just there as potential eye candy. OTOH, it's not like we're talking hours of work to get it working either. All you have to do is connect one of your PSU's 4-pin molex connectors to the female connector for the front lighting. You might want to do this at least once just to see what it looks like. :)  (Since this is LED lighting there would not be any significant power loss or heat creation to worry about).

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Just bought a SATA HD from newegg yesterday (WD 250GB 16MB Buffer 3MB). Hopefully I'll get it tomorrow. That'll solve the problem of the two IDE drives on the same cable...

Yeah, that works too.

Out of curiosity, did you actually verify that you have a performance problem when your hard drive and optical drive share the same PATA cable? Every time this subject comes up someone will always post a warning about what a bad idea it is to share cables. I know from direct experience that having two optical drives share the same PATA cable can be a problem if you try to use both drives at the same time. But I'm not convinced the same problem exists when an optical drive shares with a hard drive.

I'll probably just have to hook it up and try it some day to see what happens. Don't have time for it now, but maybe some day ... :) 

-john, the ostensibly clueless redundant legacy-in-transition dinosaur
April 2, 2007 10:26:18 PM

Thanks for the reply...

No, I never checked to see if there was a problem with having them both on the same cable. I figured I would just go with the better HD. I'm assuming I'll get better performance from it as my other one was a "Deathstar" Hitachi... as someone here so aptly called it.

I haven't even powered up my computer yet. I'm waiting to have everything in it first. Probably stupid idea but for some reason I feel more comfortable with it... Because it's the first time I've assembled a computer I'm really nervous that something will go seriously wrong. That's why I've been so anal about where the wires go. I don't want to have something where it's not supposed to be and damage something. That would be unfortunate b/c I put a lot of coin in it (well, a lot of dough to me at least... some people here have rigs that are 3000 bucks...)

I think I'll wait on the fan. I don't care about how loud it is. I usually have my speakers cranked anyways :twisted:
April 3, 2007 2:40:28 PM

Just cut the wires that aren't being used out of the case.

Just kidding...

Get some zip ties and tie them up and hide them towards the top of the case.
April 3, 2007 3:56:36 PM

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I think I'll wait on the fan. I don't care about how loud it is. I usually have my speakers cranked anyways :twisted:

In my experience, that's not really something you can decide about until you've heard the fan ... ;)  But, yes, it's definitely something for the "maybe someday" list as opposed to the "real soon now" list.

I'm tossing it back and forth in my mind. At the moment, the main source of fan noise are my 1600RPM case fans. They seemed like such a good idea until I installed them :oops:  I like the fact that they keep my case (and my hard drives!) cool. I just wish I wasn't so aware that they are running. I've been speculating about a fan controller, but haven't seen anything yet that I'd want to spend money on.

It's pretty much the same thing with the fan on my 7600GT. I think about it, but I'm not ready to do anything yet. What I'll probably do is keep an eye on the recommended VGA coolers and maybe go for one if/when I can get free shipping or some other deal that makes the price more attractive. I'm really not too eager at this time to attempt heat sink surgery on my essentially brand-new 7600GT. :(  Sufficient unto the day are the things that already need to be taken care of and all that.

-john, the ostensibly clueless redundant legacy-in-transition dinosaur
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