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Help -E6300 or E4300 ? Not OC'd before

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  • CPUs
  • Western Digital
  • Cooling
  • Product
Last response: in CPUs
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March 31, 2007 11:24:46 AM

Would like to save a few quid and get E4300, and do a small OC on that with a stock cooler without raising temps too much, not interested in running it flat out and posting scores etc

Is this possible? I figure i can save £10-15 quid buying and do a safe low temp OC to maybe 2.1GHZ+? Buying a CPU cooler is out the question at the moment by the way.

Rest of system:

Asus 650i
GSKILL 2GIG 800MHZ CAS5
Xclio Greatpower 750W
8800 GTS 320MB
1 Optical drive
200GIG WD SATA

Case NZXT ZERO with 3 120MMM fans, 1 of which is on a fan controller up to 2400RPM.

Remember, a safe, low temp OC, with a stock cooler is what i'm after, not spending £40 on a cooler and thrashing the arse off it past a E6600.

Thanks guys.


PS Just out of interest, what stable speed could i OC a E4300 toowith a proper cooler?

Cheers!

More about : e6300 e4300

March 31, 2007 12:07:01 PM

i would recommend E4300, because it has higher multipliers, you don't need to increase CPU base frequency too much to achieve overclock.

personally i only OC E6300 before, but i heard people reaching 1333FSB (333*4), which results in 2.3Ghz overclock (333*9), with stock voltage and stock cooler.

what you can do is, upon starting the system, just simply set everything at stock voltage and frequency, and bump FSB to 1333Mhz. you should be able to get a stable overclock. if you do, try to lower the voltage, until you achieve the lowest stable voltage. this will dramatically reduce CPU's heat.

you should probably wait until the end of april, when Intel is dropping their C2D price. then you can have E4320 for 120 USD or so.
March 31, 2007 12:34:02 PM

I'd definetly go with the E4300. I used the stock cooler and got it running stable at 3.6ghz (400FSB!) with only a mild voltage increase.
Related resources
March 31, 2007 12:56:10 PM

So what causes heat when OC'ing?

Is it increasing voltage?

I know nothing about OC'ing to be honest.
March 31, 2007 1:35:59 PM

Quote:
So what causes heat when OC'ing?

Is it increasing voltage?

I know nothing about OC'ing to be honest.


Basically the more work the CPU does per cycle the more heat it produces. So a CPU at a higher clockspeed will give off more heat than a CPU on the same uArch at a lower clockspeed.
March 31, 2007 2:39:10 PM

you can safely do 366 on stock cooling, if you got a good chip, however i would settle for 334 (nice round number and its lower, lol)
March 31, 2007 2:45:35 PM

What's this 334 number?
March 31, 2007 2:59:05 PM

Quote:
What's this 334 number?


He's talking about the Front Side Bus speed.
March 31, 2007 4:05:31 PM

Quote:
i would recommend E4300, because it has higher multipliers, you don't need to increase CPU base frequency too much to achieve overclock.

personally i only OC E6300 before, but i heard people reaching 1333FSB (333*4), which results in 2.3Ghz overclock (333*9), with stock voltage and stock cooler.

what you can do is, upon starting the system, just simply set everything at stock voltage and frequency, and bump FSB to 1333Mhz. you should be able to get a stable overclock. if you do, try to lower the voltage, until you achieve the lowest stable voltage. this will dramatically reduce CPU's heat.

you should probably wait until the end of april, when Intel is dropping their C2D price. then you can have E4320 for 120 USD or so.


333*9 = 2.997 ghz :?:
March 31, 2007 4:54:59 PM

set your fsb to 1500-1575 set memory to 667 or 800 (which ever it is)- tune your latencies last
set the mem/fsb to unlinked

it should boot right up at 1.35-1.4v for Vcore.

you can increase the Vcore and FSB after you tune the memory latencies

e6600 = 3.37ghz at 1500fsb - i shipped 2 systems this week with p5n-e with that speed. i highly recommend the e6600 for another $120

you should tune the nb voltage last - auto is ok but a setting the voltage is better.

do not use spread spectrum or sli memory unless you want problems!

IMPORTANT: you need to add a 40mm fan the right side of the nb heatsink it eliminate "almost" all problems with this mobo. thread the screws into the heat sink fins use a sheet metal screw about 3/4" long - i use cooler master "blue lighted" fans, removed from chipset cooler.

you may want to add a memory cooler it helps cool the mobo. i use stock intel heatsinks why waste money! they work fine if you keep the voltage under 1.45v

when you load windows set all items to defult - u may want to increase the memory voltage slightly if you using really low end memory at 1.8v stock settings.
March 31, 2007 5:28:45 PM

Quote:
i would recommend E4300, because it has higher multipliers, you don't need to increase CPU base frequency too much to achieve overclock.

personally i only OC E6300 before, but i heard people reaching 1333FSB (333*4), which results in 2.3Ghz overclock (333*9), with stock voltage and stock cooler.

what you can do is, upon starting the system, just simply set everything at stock voltage and frequency, and bump FSB to 1333Mhz. you should be able to get a stable overclock. if you do, try to lower the voltage, until you achieve the lowest stable voltage. this will dramatically reduce CPU's heat.

you should probably wait until the end of april, when Intel is dropping their C2D price. then you can have E4320 for 120 USD or so.


333*9 = 2.997 ghz :?:
oops.. my bad :oops:  :oops:  :oops:  :oops: 
time to go back to elementary school to learn multiplication :oops:  :oops: 
March 31, 2007 9:21:16 PM

Quote:
set your fsb to 1500-1575 set memory to 667 or 800 (which ever it is)- tune your latencies last
set the mem/fsb to unlinked

it should boot right up at 1.35-1.4v for Vcore.

you can increase the Vcore and FSB after you tune the memory latencies

e6600 = 3.37ghz at 1500fsb - i shipped 2 systems this week with p5n-e with that speed. i highly recommend the e6600 for another $120

you should tune the nb voltage last - auto is ok but a setting the voltage is better.

do not use spread spectrum or sli memory unless you want problems!

IMPORTANT: you need to add a 40mm fan the right side of the nb heatsink it eliminate "almost" all problems with this mobo. thread the screws into the heat sink fins use a sheet metal screw about 3/4" long - i use cooler master "blue lighted" fans, removed from chipset cooler.

you may want to add a memory cooler it helps cool the mobo. i use stock intel heatsinks why waste money! they work fine if you keep the voltage under 1.45v

when you load windows set all items to defult - u may want to increase the memory voltage slightly if you using really low end memory at 1.8v stock settings.

There is a lot of bullshit in this post. Does anyone want to play Point It Out?
!