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Plasmas: how many hours before fade sets in

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Anonymous
October 20, 2004 2:04:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I was recently told by a salesperson that "recent studies" have shown that a
plasma has 30,000 hours of viewing before it starts to fade. This is contrary
to everything I have read up to this point.

Does anyone know how long a plasma is expected to last before it begins to
fade? And how long it will last before it is so faded as to be unwatchable?

Thanks in advance.
Anonymous
October 20, 2004 2:46:36 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

crabbefan@aol.comnospam (crabbefan) wrote in
news:20041019180447.16740.00002206@mb-m11.aol.com:

> I was recently told by a salesperson that "recent studies" have shown
> that a plasma has 30,000 hours of viewing before it starts to fade.
> This is contrary to everything I have read up to this point.
>
> Does anyone know how long a plasma is expected to last before it
> begins to fade? And how long it will last before it is so faded as to
> be unwatchable?
>
> Thanks in advance.
>

Copied this out

Panasonic: States that the monitor is good for 20,000 to 30,000 hours.
They also state that these plasma displays measure 50% brightness
(phosphor ignition may be a better term) at 50,000 hours.

Fujitsu: States that the panel lasts 20,000 to 25,000 hours

Pioneer: States that the 50" PDP 502MX (or 505HD) measures half
brightness (phosphor ignition) at 30,000 hours of use. They also state
the newer model 503CMX (or Pro 1000HD) with a deeper pixel structure
will last even longer though they do not have numbers.

Sharp: States that plasma panels only last 10,000 to 20,000 hours


My understanding is it is quite expensive to replace the light in the
plasma. The LCD has the big advantage here it has a much longer lifespan
and then only an inexpensive bulb needs to be replaced. The LCD is the
future, but prices need to come down. Sharp is really pushing the LCD.
Anonymous
October 20, 2004 2:46:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"manager" <manager@aol.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9587B4DB4894DLiving@24.93.43.121...
crabbefan@aol.comnospam (crabbefan) wrote in
news:20041019180447.16740.00002206@mb-m11.aol.com:

> I was recently told by a salesperson that "recent studies" have shown
> that a plasma has 30,000 hours of viewing before it starts to fade.
> This is contrary to everything I have read up to this point.
>
> Does anyone know how long a plasma is expected to last before it
> begins to fade? And how long it will last before it is so faded as to
> be unwatchable?
>
> Thanks in advance.
>

Copied this out

Panasonic: States that the monitor is good for 20,000 to 30,000 hours.
They also state that these plasma displays measure 50% brightness
(phosphor ignition may be a better term) at 50,000 hours.

Fujitsu: States that the panel lasts 20,000 to 25,000 hours

Pioneer: States that the 50" PDP 502MX (or 505HD) measures half
brightness (phosphor ignition) at 30,000 hours of use. They also state
the newer model 503CMX (or Pro 1000HD) with a deeper pixel structure
will last even longer though they do not have numbers.

Sharp: States that plasma panels only last 10,000 to 20,000 hours

------
20,000 hours is 2.28 years of non-stop watching. If you only watch four
hours a day, that's over nine years.

Bill
Related resources
Anonymous
October 20, 2004 5:07:22 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

crabbefan wrote:
> I was recently told by a salesperson that "recent studies" have shown that a
> plasma has 30,000 hours of viewing before it starts to fade. This is contrary
> to everything I have read up to this point.
>
> Does anyone know how long a plasma is expected to last before it begins to
> fade? And how long it will last before it is so faded as to be unwatchable?
>
> Thanks in advance.

The official specs for the current Panasonic models are 60,000 hours
to 1/2 brightness, 50,000 hours for Samsung, and I believe Pioneer is
claiming 100,000 hours for their new Elite models. In the last several
generations of plasmas, the issue of the lifespan of the screen display
has become a moot one. Once you get a lifespan beyond the 30,000 hour
range (over 8 years at 10 hrs/day), the improvements in display
technology combined with falling prices will seriously obsolete the TV
before you have to replace it. 30,000 hours were considered pretty good
lifespan numbers for CRTs not too long ago. The electronics in the
plasma and LCD TVs are likely to fail before the screen displays.
Although with LCD (direct view), there is less long term experience with
really big LCDs with multiple lamps so we may eventually read about
uneven LCD screen brightness.

And no you cannot "recharge" the plasma TV. The plasma cells are
sealed in the manufacturing process.
Anonymous
October 20, 2004 11:45:37 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Alan Figgatt" <afiggatt@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:4175F28A.2040101@comcast.net...
> crabbefan wrote:
> > I was recently told by a salesperson that "recent
studies" have shown that a
> > plasma has 30,000 hours of viewing before it starts to
fade. This is contrary
> > to everything I have read up to this point.
> >
> > Does anyone know how long a plasma is expected to last
before it begins to
> > fade? And how long it will last before it is so faded as
to be unwatchable?
> >
> > Thanks in advance.
>
> The official specs for the current Panasonic models are
60,000 hours
> to 1/2 brightness, 50,000 hours for Samsung, and I believe
Pioneer is
> claiming 100,000 hours for their new Elite models. In the
last several
> generations of plasmas, the issue of the lifespan of the
screen display
> has become a moot one. Once you get a lifespan beyond the
30,000 hour
> range (over 8 years at 10 hrs/day), the improvements in
display
> technology combined with falling prices will seriously
obsolete the TV
> before you have to replace it. 30,000 hours were
considered pretty good
> lifespan numbers for CRTs not too long ago. The
electronics in the
> plasma and LCD TVs are likely to fail before the screen
displays.
> Although with LCD (direct view), there is less long term
experience with
> really big LCDs with multiple lamps so we may eventually
read about
> uneven LCD screen brightness.
>
> And no you cannot "recharge" the plasma TV. The plasma
cells are
> sealed in the manufacturing process.

And how long before logos and other stuff get burned in on
plasma sets? :) ) ...tonyC
Anonymous
October 20, 2004 8:15:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

crabbefan wrote:

> I was recently told by a salesperson that "recent studies" have shown that a
> plasma has 30,000 hours of viewing before it starts to fade. This is contrary
> to everything I have read up to this point.

It is also contrary to expected behavior. A plasma panel will start
fading the very first time it is turned on. 30,000 hours is the expected
time for the output of the panel's phosphors to reduce to half of what
it was when new.

> Does anyone know how long a plasma is expected to last before it begins to
> fade? And how long it will last before it is so faded as to be unwatchable?

So faded as to be unwatchable could be at less than 10,000 to 100,000
hours or more. That is an subjective measurement. How much fade can any
particular person put up with? 50% output is an objective measurement.

The real issue isn't the fade rate as now noticeable differential fading
(AKA burn in) is. Time to 50% output is not a very good indicator of
differential fading unless the fade rate is linear and equal for all
three phosphors, which I would expect it not to be.

Matthew
Anonymous
October 20, 2004 11:58:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Lets run some numbers.

Lets say you sit in front of the TV 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, all year
long.

30,000 / 24 = 1250 Days, or 3.42 years.

Now, lets be more realistic, suppose your TV is on 8 hours a day (which is
probably comparable to real world usage for most people).

30,000/8 = 3750 days, or 10.27 years.

I figure 8 hours/day is normal, and I feel 10 years to be an acceptable
lifespan for a TV.

--Dan

"crabbefan" <crabbefan@aol.comnospam> wrote in message
news:20041019180447.16740.00002206@mb-m11.aol.com...
> I was recently told by a salesperson that "recent studies" have shown that
a
> plasma has 30,000 hours of viewing before it starts to fade. This is
contrary
> to everything I have read up to this point.
>
> Does anyone know how long a plasma is expected to last before it begins to
> fade? And how long it will last before it is so faded as to be
unwatchable?
>
> Thanks in advance.
Anonymous
October 21, 2004 12:29:23 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> done wrote:

> Now, lets be more realistic, suppose your TV is on 8 hours a day
> (which is probably comparable to real world usage for most people).

If this is true, then no wonder the world is going to shits... I mean, I
like watching TV as much as the next guy, but come on... 8 hours a day on
average?

--
Stein

.... but what about the children?
October 21, 2004 2:23:11 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On 20 Oct 2004 20:29:23 GMT, Stein Hals <stein.news@gmail.com> wrote:

>"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> done wrote:
>
>> Now, lets be more realistic, suppose your TV is on 8 hours a day
>> (which is probably comparable to real world usage for most people).
>
>If this is true, then no wonder the world is going to shits... I mean, I
>like watching TV as much as the next guy, but come on... 8 hours a day on
>average?

No kids?
Thumper
To reply drop XYZ in address
Anonymous
October 21, 2004 11:01:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Stein Hals wrote:

> "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> done wrote:
>
>
>>Now, lets be more realistic, suppose your TV is on 8 hours a day
>>(which is probably comparable to real world usage for most people).
>
>
> If this is true, then no wonder the world is going to shits... I mean, I
> like watching TV as much as the next guy, but come on... 8 hours a day on
> average?
>

I watch less than three hours of TV a day. My wife leaves the TV on for
company when I'm at work. It's on about 12 hours a day.

Matthew
Anonymous
October 22, 2004 10:41:55 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

It sounds bad at first, but I think it is probably true. I probably only
WATCH 2 to 3 hours of TV a day, and that is at night from 8-10pm. But my
wife works at home and often likes to have the TV on while she works, mostly
listening to the audio of movies or tv shows. 8 hours a day of being ON is
realistic for my home, not necessarily watching.

I once heard on the radio that people on average open their refrigerator 22
times a day. I thought that was crazy, but ever since then I notice myself
opening the refrigerator and I think 22 times a day is realistic.

--Dan

"Stein Hals" <stein.news@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:Xns9588A7BE2C13Celvisisking@130.133.1.4...
> "dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> done wrote:
>
> > Now, lets be more realistic, suppose your TV is on 8 hours a day
> > (which is probably comparable to real world usage for most people).
>
> If this is true, then no wonder the world is going to shits... I mean, I
> like watching TV as much as the next guy, but come on... 8 hours a day on
> average?
>
> --
> Stein
>
> ... but what about the children?
Anonymous
October 22, 2004 10:57:52 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"dg" <dan_gus@hotmail.com> done wrote:

> It sounds bad at first, but I think it is probably true. I probably
> only WATCH 2 to 3 hours of TV a day, and that is at night from 8-10pm.

That's about my pattern as well, about 2 hours a day. In addition my kid
watches about 30 minutes to an hour in the mornings, and about 30 minutes
in the afternoon. So, on average my TV is on maybe 4 hours a day.

> But my wife works at home and often likes to have the TV on while she
> works, mostly listening to the audio of movies or tv shows. 8 hours a
> day of being ON is realistic for my home, not necessarily watching.

If all she does is listening to the audio, I wouldn't waste my plasma set
(if I had one) on that, and either get her a cheapo separate TV for that
purpose, or just have her listen to the audio through the stereo with the
TV off.

> then I notice myself opening the refrigerator and I think 22 times a
> day is realistic.

That's probably on the low-end for me. I guess we all have our vices :) 

--
Stein

.... but what about the children?
!