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SATA or IDE DVD/CD drive?

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April 3, 2007 3:21:27 AM

I plan on running 2 SATA HDD’s and 2 DVD/CD RW drives on a Gigabyte 965G DS3. Should I buy SATA DVD/CD drives (they only seem to cost about $5 more)?

More about : sata ide dvd drive

a b G Storage
April 3, 2007 3:38:17 AM

Yes, Forget about IDE drives altogether. Eventually Parallel ports on motherboards, and PATA drives will disappear.We will be left with SATA devices, in all their glory.
April 9, 2007 11:24:24 AM

Quote:
Yes, Forget about IDE drives altogether. Eventually Parallel ports on motherboards, and PATA drives will disappear.We will be left with SATA devices, in all their glory.


Are there any issues with using SATA instead of IDE for optical devices? I've read a few Newegg reviews that say this but they didn't explain why.
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April 9, 2007 12:24:46 PM

Hi,

I have buy a liteon sata dvd-rom and dvd-rw, and have no problem with them on my Asus P5W DH.

No difference, and can boot from them like any ide dvd/dvdrw.

Brad
April 9, 2007 1:13:19 PM

I thought that optical drives still cant achieve a data rate higher then IDE can handle, so there is no real performance benifit.
April 9, 2007 1:14:51 PM

Performance is not the reason, clean cable routing is!
April 9, 2007 1:17:18 PM

Ok but why not use rounded cables?
April 9, 2007 1:23:51 PM

SATA drives are cooler!
Literally... smaller cable gives more space for air to move around... otherwise there is no actual difference. Might as well go ahead and get SATA though as eventually IDE will be gone altogether from chipset architecture.
April 9, 2007 2:12:43 PM

No performance benefit, but future proof benefit as a poster above mentioned.
April 9, 2007 2:57:31 PM

Quote:
Ok but why not use rounded cables?
:Then you would be addding 5$ to $10 to the total cost of the drive.Stick with SATA.
April 9, 2007 3:00:40 PM

I run an ASUS SATA drive on that board and it installs windows fine. It is kind of loud. I herd the sony and pioneer are better and cost the same.
April 9, 2007 3:41:32 PM

Quote:
Are there any issues with using SATA instead of IDE for optical devices? I've read a few Newegg reviews that say this but they didn't explain why.


You are starting to see that with IDE devices now. Since some of the newer chipsets no longer include IDE, they've had to add chips that seem to be causing problems.

Quote:
I thought that optical drives still cant achieve a data rate higher then IDE can handle, so there is no real performance benifit.


Most of the impressive bandwidth/data stuff we here about SATA are burst rates, there really is still no vast overall performance improvement here despite some impressive sounding math. It still more comes down to how fast those plates start up, and how fast they keep spinning. Or how fast the dvd spins, in this case.

The real major benefit of SATA as it pertains to most of us, is the cooling benefit of smaller cables, and cheapness of integrated RAID found on even the most basic of modern chipsets through SATA. That is ultimately it.
As it stands the bandwidth potential is largely unused and limited to the problems above... at least with traditional storage. That extra bandwidth is great for solid-state or other non-moving storage solutions.
April 9, 2007 5:42:30 PM

while it is probably pointless to bring this up....

a SATA drive is still "IDE" just as a PATA drive is still "IDE", the difference is in how the data and control signals are applied. Optical drives used to be refered to as ATAPI drives but have been bastardized into "IDE" due to the interface (PATA) they connect to.

(all of the above has nothing to do with SCSI drives which require a SCSI controller interface card and proper termination in most cases)
April 9, 2007 7:49:12 PM

While true, I didn't bother with such technicalities since it would be easier to use the IDE vs SATA terminology in the OP so we would all understand each other since, for marketing purposes, and thus sales, the 40pin older PATA interface is typically sold as "IDE" or still "EIDE" interface.
April 11, 2007 7:43:32 PM

Quote:
Are there any issues with using SATA instead of IDE for optical devices? I've read a few Newegg reviews that say this but they didn't explain why.


You are starting to see that with IDE devices now. Since some of the newer chipsets no longer include IDE, they've had to add chips that seem to be causing problems.

Quote:
I thought that optical drives still cant achieve a data rate higher then IDE can handle, so there is no real performance benifit.


Most of the impressive bandwidth/data stuff we here about SATA are burst rates, there really is still no vast overall performance improvement here despite some impressive sounding math. It still more comes down to how fast those plates start up, and how fast they keep spinning. Or how fast the dvd spins, in this case.

The real major benefit of SATA as it pertains to most of us, is the cooling benefit of smaller cables, and cheapness of integrated RAID found on even the most basic of modern chipsets through SATA. That is ultimately it.
As it stands the bandwidth potential is largely unused and limited to the problems above... at least with traditional storage. That extra bandwidth is great for solid-state or other non-moving storage solutions.

The only *real* reason for using PATA as opposed to SATA is lack of support in the OS (either for SATA directly or the chipset the motherboard uses). However, this is a non-issue with Intel chipsets since the ICH5R and SR southbridges brought SATA support mainstream, or for nVidia chipsets since nForce 3 (again, SATA support is included at the chipset level). With the chipsets of both companies and Windows Vista, there is even less of a reason for sticking with PATA, especially in new contruction (or in the case of upgrading an existing Windows XP PC), as this operating system, like Windows XP with Service Pack 1 and later, not only explicitly supports SATA, but most of the SATA 3G feature set. Also, unlike PATA, SATA is a true point-to-point connection protocol (no more master and slave), which eliminates a major sticking point when adding a new drive (optical or otherwise). Finally, in addition to the dearth of PATA interfaces on new motherboards (the Q965 chipset from Intel doesn't have any!), there is a veritable *surplus* of SATA interfaces (not necessarily RAID, either) on newer motherboards (nForce 680i Reference designs, such as the EVGA nF-68-T1, have *six* SATA ports, none of which are RAID-specific, while all six *can* be used for RAID; this compares to my current ASUS P4C800E-Deluxe, which has four SATA ports, of which two can only be used for SATA RAID, and was new in 2004)
April 29, 2007 5:43:19 AM

Get the SATA. Though there really isn't a 'speed' advantage to this (for optical drives), it certainly will free up some space in your case.
April 25, 2009 5:48:43 AM

djbrad007 said:
Hi,

I have buy a liteon sata dvd-rom and dvd-rw, and have no problem with them on my Asus P5W DH.

No difference, and can boot from them like any ide dvd/dvdrw.

Brad



Can you please tell me how to hook up two SATA cd's to the P5WDH MOBO. I currently have 4 SATA hard drives installed one as a boot drive and three hooked up as a raid five. That only leaves the two backup SATA ports, but how does one configure them to recognize the SATA CD drives? Any help would be appreciated.

T
April 28, 2009 5:54:37 AM

Some early SATA motherboards did not play nice with some SATA burners. Be careful.
March 21, 2013 4:13:44 PM

Tiger39 said:
djbrad007 said:
Hi,

I have buy a liteon sata dvd-rom and dvd-rw, and have no problem with them on my Asus P5W DH.

No difference, and can boot from them like any ide dvd/dvdrw.

Brad



Can you please tell me how to hook up two SATA cd's to the P5WDH MOBO. I currently have 4 SATA hard drives installed one as a boot drive and three hooked up as a raid five. That only leaves the two backup SATA ports, but how does one configure them to recognize the SATA CD drives? Any help would be appreciated.

T


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