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New Mobo, New OS... GREAT!!!....not

Last response: in Windows 7
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July 25, 2011 3:45:09 PM

I made the mistake of buying a HP Compaq computer some time ago and when it came time for me to buy a GPU I take a look at the mobo and discover all I have is MINI PCI slots. I raged hard. I've found a new mobo to go with (Gigabyte) but since the mobo I have now is tattooed I need to re-install my Windows 7.

HP didn't give me the original Windows installation disc so I've been looking online for ISO's and I've found their are 2 versions of the x64 bit version: OEM and Retail.

So my questions are: What are the main differences between the two? will I be able to use my current Windows activation code with my new windows? (does OEM or Retail matter in that case?)

Explanation of this would be greatly appreciated! Hopefully from experience, I don't like taking risks :non: 

More about : mobo great

July 25, 2011 4:11:01 PM

In this case, OEM means that once you install the OS on that machine, the activation code/serial for the OS is tied to that computer. So, if you wanted to transfer that OS to a different machine, you'd have to call the manufacturer and explain the change.

With retail though, you're also given a box, manual and tech support. And you pay more money. BUT, you're given the freedom of uninstalling and reinstalling that OS on different machines without having to answer to that manufacturer.

So, my recommendation would be to buy the retail, not the OEM; unless you plan on never using that OS for other machines too. And to answer your question, yes, you would be able to use your pre-existing activation code, but only if you called MS and explained the situation.

I hope this helped!
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a b α HP
a b $ Windows 7
July 25, 2011 5:19:23 PM

+1 swapping a motherboard shouldn't stop you reactivating, M$ has to accept that models change even from big OEM's like HP.
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July 25, 2011 5:27:57 PM

So I should download Retail and call microsoft and tell them my motherboard fried and i bought a replacement :p  (even though it was to get a motherboard that ACTUALLY had a PCI slot for a GPU upgrade)
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a b α HP
a c 401 $ Windows 7
July 25, 2011 8:59:35 PM

What is the difference between the OEM, and the Retail version of Windows 7?

There are 3 major differences between these 2 items. The physical DVD disks themselves contain exactly the same content.


1. OEM copies of Windows 7 come in either 32, or 64 bit flavors. You must decide which version you want, and make sure you purchase that copy. With a retail copy, you get both 32 and 64 bit Windows 7 DVD’s in the same box.

2. OEM copies cannot be transferred from one PC to another. Once you install an OEM copy of Windows 7 on a PC it must remain with that PC forever, unless upgraded to a newer version of Windows in the future. Retail versions can be moved from PC to PC, but your retail copy of Windows 7 cannot be installed on more than one PC at any given time
.

3. OEM copies do not come with any support from Microsoft. If you need to call Microsoft for support with Windows 7, you must pay a fee to do so. Retail copies come with a phone support incident included in the price.



Microsoft recently made a change to the licence agreement saying that a new motherboard is equal to a new computer, hence you need to purchase a new Windows licence. Here is what Microsoft has to say: "An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a 'new personal computer' to which Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from another computer. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created and the license of new operating system software is required." Please note that this does not go for retail copies of Windows, but only for OEM versions.

You need to purchase a new license.

OEM and Retail versions can be found here!
http://www.newegg.com/Store/SubCategory.aspx?SubCategor...
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July 25, 2011 9:17:28 PM

mcH4Mmer said:
So I should download Retail and call microsoft and tell them my motherboard fried and i bought a replacement :p  (even though it was to get a motherboard that ACTUALLY had a PCI slot for a GPU upgrade)



Just buy a retail version and do a clean install. Problem solved!
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a b α HP
a c 401 $ Windows 7
July 25, 2011 9:18:06 PM

PLUS 1 ^
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a b $ Windows 7
July 25, 2011 10:11:40 PM

On the OEM version and transfering to New MB. This is allowable if the MB dies.

Note area51's comment:
quote
If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created and the license of new operating system software is required
end quote

Hard to argue that MB did NOT have a defect if it Died. Also Note if you buy a OEM version - YOU are the manufacture.
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July 25, 2011 10:35:32 PM

Not having a PCI slot is a defect in my opinion, so I'll call up microsoft and see what they say, if not I'll call back and say it fried lol
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July 25, 2011 10:36:31 PM

calmstateofmind said:
Just buy a retail version and do a clean install. Problem solved!


But can't I just use the serial code I already have..?
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July 25, 2011 11:08:35 PM

RetiredChief said:
Also Note if you buy a OEM version - YOU are the manufacture.


+1 to that.

OEM is somewhat tricky (not really, but definitely more complicated than it needs to be), as there are conditions in which ownership may be different in different scenarios. But that's aside the point...


mcH4Mmer said:
But can't I just use the serial code I already have..?


Well, in your OP you stated that you no longer have the OS disc, no? If that's true, then how would you do an install? HP might have a recovery feature included on their driver disc, or whatever, but that just restores the PC to factory settings, not install a new/different version of Windows.

So with you changing the mobo, as a previous poster stated, that would no longer be the factory created system and I'm not sure if the restore would be successful. It sounds to me that your only course of action is to buy a new, retail version of Windows. That way you won't have this problem in the future, or ones alike...
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a b α HP
a c 401 $ Windows 7
July 25, 2011 11:17:36 PM

They make low profile video cards ,so your computer is not defective!
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a b $ Windows 7
July 25, 2011 11:53:38 PM

I was having problems installing the operating system on to a new Agility III for my new SB notebook - finally gave up. Stuck my intel G2 in to the laptop, grabbed my upgrade ver of windows 7 and loaded the operating system (requires a custom instal, registry edit and a reset of arm bit). (NOTE did NOT use the recovery disk). After satisfied that installation was good, entered the Key that came with the laptop, not the Key for the Upgrade. - Activated without a hitch. ALSO NOTE this would have worked even if I did not have the orginal installation disk.

Difference here is Two fold (1) I used the Key that was for the intended system. (2) the OP's MB did not Die, he chose to upgrade the MB. Therefore to try this method in the OP's case would be illegal and Unethical.
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July 26, 2011 12:00:47 AM

RetiredChief said:
...would be illegal and Unethical.


Isn't that the same thing in this world? :na: 
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July 26, 2011 4:46:48 AM

Thanks for all the replies guys! I appreciate the feedback! But here is a much-needed list of what I'm trying to do with my PC to clear everything up to you guys...

Here is my plan:
Step 1: Recieve new (replacement) Mobo & GPU.
Step 2: Download Windows 7 Installation ISO (Retail im guessing) then burn to DVD.
Step 3: Install replacement Mobo.
Step 4: Reinstall Windows (Clean Install) to wipe all the HP software or whatever it is that is making the computer only work with the (pre-installed) OEM Mobo.
Step 5: Activate Windows with my CURRENT activation serial (the one that came with the PC).
Step 6: (If Step 5 dosent work as intended) Call Microsoft and tell them my Mobo is defective/fried (whatever) and get my Windows authorized (I guess they give me a new serial in exchange for the one I have now?)

Please don't give me an "this is illegal" answer... Not having a PCI slot in your Mobo should be illegal!
Give me something enthusiastic. :hello:  Like a step I should do differently for complete success! :wahoo: 

Thanks in advance!
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a b α HP
a c 401 $ Windows 7
July 26, 2011 12:42:26 PM

Microsoft recently made a change to the licence agreement saying that a new motherboard is equal to a new computer, hence you need to purchase a new Windows licence. Here is what Microsoft has to say: "An upgrade of the motherboard is considered to result in a 'new personal computer' to which Microsoft OEM operating system software cannot be transferred from another computer. If the motherboard is upgraded or replaced for reasons other than a defect, then a new computer has been created and the license of new operating system software is required." Please note that this does not go for retail copies of Windows, but only for OEM versions.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 26, 2011 3:04:06 PM

^ 2nded
You are Upgrading a "working" MB so Not allowed.

calmstateofmind - Unethical is not always llegal as Unethical can be based on moral beliefs. Some would say that a 70 year old man marring a 18 Year old lady so he can have LEGAL sex would be Unethical but not Illegal.

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a b α HP
a c 354 $ Windows 7
July 26, 2011 3:52:55 PM

Using a Retail Windows 7 disk with an OEM key will not work. Just contact HP and get a recovery disk sent that will work with the key on the case. The you'll have to use new drivers for the system since you have a new motherboard. If you system is still running, there should be a way to make recovery disks. The system would either have come with the disks, a recovery partition and/or a utility to make restore disks.

You can get a 1x PCIe video card also, they just won't be very powerful. But I'm guessing the power supply in your system is not very powerful either so you don't want a high end or medium range video card anyway. Unless you mean to say you don't have any PCIe slots at all and just have PCI slots.
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a b $ Windows 7
July 26, 2011 5:16:17 PM

^ "Using a Retail Windows 7 disk with an OEM key will not work" Should read may or may not - Worked for me and Did Not even have to call MS.

"Just contact HP and get a recovery disk" Recovery disk from HP, unless they provide a generic OEM version, will not work. Normal recovery disk will check system and not work on a NON-HP system. He swapped out the MB. So if he were to contact them he would need to clearly stat that he swapped out the MB and would their recovery disk work.

YES on PSU comment.

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a b α HP
a c 401 $ Windows 7
July 26, 2011 6:03:46 PM

OEM (major PC manufacturer) This is, by far, the cheapest way to purchase Windows 7. The top 20 or so PC makers (sometimes called “royalty OEMs”) collectively sell millions of PCs per month with Windows already installed on them. When you start up that PC for the first time, you accept two license agreements, one with the manufacturer and one with Microsoft. Here’s what you need to know about this type of license agreement:

Your Windows license agreement is between you and the PC maker, not between you and Microsoft.
The OEM uses special imaging tools to install Windows on PCs they manufacture. When you first turn on the PC, you accept a license agreement with the OEM and with Microsoft.
The PC maker is required to provide support for Windows. Except for security issues, Microsoft will not provide free support for any issues you have with Windows purchased from an OEM.

Your copy of Windows is locked to the PC on which you purchased it. You cannot transfer that license to another PC.
You can upgrade any components or peripherals on your PC and keep your license intact. You can replace the motherboard with an identical model or an equivalent model from the OEM if it fails. However, if you personally replace or upgrade the motherboard, your OEM Windows license is null and void.
Windows activation is typically not required when Windows is preinstalled by a royalty OEM. Instead, these copies are pre-activated at the factory. Your copy of Windows will be automatically reactivated if you reinstall it using the media or recovery partition from the PC maker, it will not require activation.
At the time you purchase an OEM copy of Windows 7 to be preinstalled on a new PC, you must choose either 32-bit or 64-bit Windows. Your agreement with the OEM determines whether you can switch to a different version; some PC makers support only a single version with specific PC models and will not allow you to switch from 32-bit to 64-bit (or vice versa) after purchase.
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July 26, 2011 7:58:53 PM

Retail version...you do what the flip you want. :kaola: 
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a b $ Windows 7
July 26, 2011 9:13:19 PM

The key you have on the side of your computer will work with an OEM copy of Windows 7... so if you want to save money, that is the way to go.

If you don't mind purchasing retail, then you'll get another key anyway.
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July 27, 2011 12:05:07 AM

I have a PSU for the upgrade.

So If I use the OEM version of the Windows Installer (ISO) my key will work?
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July 27, 2011 12:15:32 AM

mcH4Mmer said:
I have a PSU for the upgrade.

So If I use the OEM version of the Windows Installer (ISO) my key will work?


No. Unless you have identical hardware from when you first purchased the PC, the key will not work. If you want to change out the motherboard for a different one that has a PCIe slot, you must purchase a different key.

And, given your current situation and taking into account the future, it would be smarter to purchase a retail version so this doesn't happen again, and so if/when you buy a new computer, you won't be forced to buy another key (if it doesn't come with a full OS already on it). But then as well, if you want to change out parts in that PC, you'll need to get yet another unique key (if you don't have a retail version OS on that machine).

Make sense?
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July 27, 2011 12:44:27 AM

Yeah it makes sense...it's all just really disapointing
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a b α HP
a c 401 $ Windows 7
July 27, 2011 12:47:39 AM

It sounds lame , but that is the way Microsoft handles their OEM keys!
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July 27, 2011 12:59:26 AM

mcH4Mmer said:
Yeah it makes sense...it's all just really disapointing



Indeed. Best of luck though, hopefully you'll be satisfied with the system after you install the new graphics card. :D 
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