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Understanding OEM software

Last response: in Windows XP
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July 1, 2006 3:13:48 AM

I understand OEM software license as follows:

When I install OEM software on a computer, I can't ever move the software to another computer. (Another computer = different motherboard/chipset from the original computer.)

But, I can reinstall the software on the original computer as often and for whatever reason as I please. I can even reinstall the software for any hardware upgrades and/or replacement, except the motherboard (which would be considered as a new computer).

I am thinking about AM2 platform build in the near future using Windoze pro OEM OS. Then, in the future (when AMD releases their 65nm processors), upgrade the CPU without having to replace/repurchase the OS.

Do you have to reinstall Windoze if you change the CPU?

Thanks
July 1, 2006 5:26:26 AM

I think you are right. Windows only cares about major hardware upgrades (i.e. motherboard). I built my parents a socket A PC with an XP 1800+ and then changed it to a 2600+ down the road and never had a problem with Windows.
July 5, 2006 2:17:15 PM

it will work fine with the new cpu
you wont have to reinstall
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July 10, 2006 6:43:28 PM

It's a moot point if your version of Windows is OEM or not.

The main reason you have to reinstall when you change your motherboard is that Windows detects your hardware when installing and tailors itself around your motherboard. It builds itself based off the HAL which fully integrates Windows with your hardware (motherboard). Should you change that motherboard out, most likely you'll end up with blue screens unless you stick to the same chipsets. Even then, your installation wil lbecome unstable in most situations.
July 10, 2006 8:32:16 PM

Quote:
The main reason you have to reinstall when you change your motherboard is that Windows detects your hardware when installing and tailors itself around your motherboard. It builds itself based off the HAL which fully integrates Windows with your hardware (motherboard). Should you change that motherboard out, most likely you'll end up with blue screens unless you stick to the same chipsets. Even then, your installation wil lbecome unstable in most situations.


You can change motherboards (even to a different chipset) rather successfully under Windows XP if you do it right. I've done it several times in the past.

The main issue is configuring Windows on the old motherboard prior to changing it out so that the installation will boot on the new motherboard. There are several similar methods out there, but the following guide is one of the better ones I've seen:

Upgrading a Motherboard without Reinstalling Windows
July 19, 2006 8:22:21 AM

Thanks for the info. I was a little worried with going with OEM since I need the savings.
!