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HDTV, DLP VS LCD VS RPTV Please help!!

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Anonymous
October 27, 2004 7:26:00 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

My 53" Sony RPTV is still going after about 10 years of hard use, but it's
time for an upgrade. I'm looking for a set that will be used about 50% of
the time for broadcast T.V. and 50% movies. No computers, games, etc., and
I watch allot of sports and of course I'm looking for the best bang for the
buck.

I've been reading up on the differences between DLP and LCD and both still
seem to have their problems, but to my eyes the DLP looked the best (of the
sets I've seen, and the Samsung was my favorite) and from what I've read is
supposed to be a bit more reliable than the LCD's. A salesman (yeah I know)
told me the LCD start to fade after a few years of use. What I've been
unable to determine is how the new generation of CRT based rear projectors
compare to these new technology's. T.V.'s are on allot in our house and
routinely get 10 hours or more use a day and at this rate I would have to
replace the Bulb in a LCD or DLP set every two or three years at $300-$400 a
pop. As far as I can tell the CRT units still have the convergence issues,
are not as bright, and are bigger and heavier (This doesn't really bother
me). My question is how do the newer CRT's compare picture wise to the
newer technology's? I've read that regardless of how good the CRT's get,
they still cannot match the other formats in realism and the 3D look.

I'm sure several of you have wrestled with this issue and I like to hear how
you chose and why.

Thanks,
Jack

More about : hdtv dlp lcd rptv

Anonymous
October 28, 2004 4:33:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I've looked long and hard at the JVC DILA, Sony LCD, and all the DLP
sets and I still think DLP is the best of the three. I'm probably
going to buy a Mitsubishi this weekend and take advantage of the great
financing they offer and the $300 rebate announced yesterday.

Actually, if you have the real estate, most videophiles still prefer
the rear projection CRT as having the best overall picture once it's
tuned properly. But the newer technologies offer thinner profiles,
low weight, and the PQ is pretty darn good.

As far as the bulb goes, I've heard the bulbs are rated for 8000 hours
but the more you turn the set on and off the quicker it will go. Most
experts suggest leaving the DLP on say... from 5PM to 11PM rather than
flipping them on and off 3-4 times during an evening. That time frame
is just an example.

Tweeter's warranty does not cover the bulb but other stores like
Bernies (CT/MA) do cover the bulb. IMHO, this is probably one time
that a long-term warranty is justified.

Have fun.



On Wed, 27 Oct 2004 15:26:00 GMT, "Jack Dotson" <jdotson@stx.rr.com>
wrote:

>My 53" Sony RPTV is still going after about 10 years of hard use, but it's
>time for an upgrade. I'm looking for a set that will be used about 50% of
>the time for broadcast T.V. and 50% movies. No computers, games, etc., and
>I watch allot of sports and of course I'm looking for the best bang for the
>buck.
>
>I've been reading up on the differences between DLP and LCD and both still
>seem to have their problems, but to my eyes the DLP looked the best (of the
>sets I've seen, and the Samsung was my favorite) and from what I've read is
>supposed to be a bit more reliable than the LCD's. A salesman (yeah I know)
>told me the LCD start to fade after a few years of use. What I've been
>unable to determine is how the new generation of CRT based rear projectors
>compare to these new technology's. T.V.'s are on allot in our house and
>routinely get 10 hours or more use a day and at this rate I would have to
>replace the Bulb in a LCD or DLP set every two or three years at $300-$400 a
>pop. As far as I can tell the CRT units still have the convergence issues,
>are not as bright, and are bigger and heavier (This doesn't really bother
>me). My question is how do the newer CRT's compare picture wise to the
>newer technology's? I've read that regardless of how good the CRT's get,
>they still cannot match the other formats in realism and the 3D look.
>
>I'm sure several of you have wrestled with this issue and I like to hear how
>you chose and why.
>
>Thanks,
>Jack
>
October 28, 2004 7:50:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Somewhere around Wed, 27 Oct 2004 15:26:00 GMT, while reading
alt.tv.tech.hdtv, I think I thought I saw this post from "Jack Dotson"
<jdotson@stx.rr.com>:

>My 53" Sony RPTV is still going after about 10 years of hard use, but it's
>time for an upgrade. I'm looking for a set that will be used about 50% of
>the time for broadcast T.V. and 50% movies. No computers, games, etc., and
>I watch allot of sports and of course I'm looking for the best bang for the
>buck.
>
>I've been reading up on the differences between DLP and LCD and both still
>seem to have their problems, but to my eyes the DLP looked the best (of the
>sets I've seen, and the Samsung was my favorite) and from what I've read is
>supposed to be a bit more reliable than the LCD's. A salesman (yeah I know)
>told me the LCD start to fade after a few years of use. What I've been
>unable to determine is how the new generation of CRT based rear projectors
>compare to these new technology's. T.V.'s are on allot in our house and
>routinely get 10 hours or more use a day and at this rate I would have to
>replace the Bulb in a LCD or DLP set every two or three years at $300-$400 a
>pop. As far as I can tell the CRT units still have the convergence issues,
>are not as bright, and are bigger and heavier (This doesn't really bother
>me). My question is how do the newer CRT's compare picture wise to the
>newer technology's? I've read that regardless of how good the CRT's get,
>they still cannot match the other formats in realism and the 3D look.
>
>I'm sure several of you have wrestled with this issue and I like to hear how
>you chose and why.

My take is that old-fashioned CRT (aka direct view) is still potentially the
best, but I wouldn't buy one - too big and heavy.

Plasma is 2nd best, but the good ones are too expensive for me, plus there
is the potential for burn-in and longevity issues (maybe).

LCD is nice, but too expensive for large size, and not as much contrast or
range of colors as some other formats. The best LCDs are about 800:1
contrast ratio. The newer DLP rear-projection units are 2500:1.

I like DLP, mainly because they are light, fairly thin, and good picture.
I'm about to get a Samsung HLP-4663, 46 inch for about $2600 out the door
price. It weighs 70 lbs, and is about 13" deep. If weight and depth don't
matter, I think almost all rear-projection TVs look pretty good these days.
There is the possibility of burn-in with CRT-based units, though.

I'd consider a Mitsubish DLP, but the protective screen has too much glare.

--
Marty - mjf at leftcoast-usa.com
"Those are my principles, and if you don't like them...
well, I have others." - Groucho Marx
!