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Best Buy Warranty a Must

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Anonymous
October 28, 2004 6:54:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing I
had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of course.
The set was manufactured in January and according to the serial number it
has the modification that was supposed to fix the problem but apparently
the defect isn't really fixed. The Best Buy service guy just came by and
replaced the lamp, it's working now. According to him a new lamp is $410
so I'm already ahead on the warranty which cost $399. At three lamps a
year that $399 warranty is going to buy me $4,800 worth of lamps. BTW he
says that one of the sources of failure is turning off the line power so
that the fans don't have a chance to cool the lamp. The usual reason for
losing line power is that people use the switched outlet on the cable box.
I don't do that, I power the set from a power strip. However I do have
power failures every month which might have been the reason for the lamp
failure. I'm going to put a UPS on the set, I have one on all of my
computers so I might as well put one on the set.

More about : buy warranty

Anonymous
October 28, 2004 11:42:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

The replacement bulb is $199 and this problem has been heavily discussed at
avsforum.com

-Ken

"General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com...
> My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing I
> had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of course.
> The set was manufactured in January and according to the serial number it
> has the modification that was supposed to fix the problem but apparently
> the defect isn't really fixed. The Best Buy service guy just came by and
> replaced the lamp, it's working now. According to him a new lamp is $410
> so I'm already ahead on the warranty which cost $399. At three lamps a
> year that $399 warranty is going to buy me $4,800 worth of lamps. BTW he
> says that one of the sources of failure is turning off the line power so
> that the fans don't have a chance to cool the lamp. The usual reason for
> losing line power is that people use the switched outlet on the cable box.
> I don't do that, I power the set from a power strip. However I do have
> power failures every month which might have been the reason for the lamp
> failure. I'm going to put a UPS on the set, I have one on all of my
> computers so I might as well put one on the set.
>
>
Anonymous
October 28, 2004 11:42:40 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 19:42:39 +0000, K V wrote:

> The replacement bulb is $199 and this problem has been heavily discussed at
> avsforum.com
>
> -Ken
>
> "General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:p an.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com...
>> My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing I
>> had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of course.
>> The set was manufactured in January and according to the serial number it
>> has the modification that was supposed to fix the problem but apparently
>> the defect isn't really fixed. The Best Buy service guy just came by and
>> replaced the lamp, it's working now. According to him a new lamp is $410
>> so I'm already ahead on the warranty which cost $399. At three lamps a
>> year that $399 warranty is going to buy me $4,800 worth of lamps. BTW he
>> says that one of the sources of failure is turning off the line power so
>> that the fans don't have a chance to cool the lamp. The usual reason for
>> losing line power is that people use the switched outlet on the cable box.
>> I don't do that, I power the set from a power strip. However I do have
>> power failures every month which might have been the reason for the lamp
>> failure. I'm going to put a UPS on the set, I have one on all of my
>> computers so I might as well put one on the set.
>>
>>
Even at $199 it's still worth it. A bulb every 4 months pays for the
warranty pretty quickly.
Related resources
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 11:46:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com...
> My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing I
> had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of course.
> The set was manufactured in January and according to the serial number it
> has the modification that was supposed to fix the problem but apparently
> the defect isn't really fixed.

Maybe you just got a bad lamp. Why would you assume that there is something
else that caused it? Even during the period where Sony sets were supposed
to have had the "problem", none of the sets we sold had any lamp failures.
The fact is, some lamps just fail early, some last thousands of hours. It
varies. Every manufacturer has these variations.

>The Best Buy service guy just came by and
> replaced the lamp, it's working now. According to him a new lamp is $410
> so I'm already ahead on the warranty which cost $399. At three lamps a
> year that $399 warranty is going to buy me $4,800 worth of lamps. BTW he
> says that one of the sources of failure is turning off the line power so
> that the fans don't have a chance to cool the lamp.

Actually, every startup cycle ages the lamp some, but turning the fans off
by cutting the standby power is not a problem. The bigger problem would be
restarting the lamp before it cools down. All sets that I know of have a
turn-on delay anyway. I have discussed the matter with several
manufacturers and the answer is the same...don't worry about it, just
minimize on-off cyles in general. When the lamps are started a series of
high voltage pulses are used to get them going, then the voltage drops to
several hundred volts. If the lamp is restarted before cooling it is much
more likely to fail and ages much more quickly. Cooling it down slower by
cutting the fans is itself not a problem. Regardless, the set should not be
plugged in to a switched outlet in most cases.

>The usual reason for
> losing line power is that people use the switched outlet on the cable box.
> I don't do that, I power the set from a power strip. However I do have
> power failures every month which might have been the reason for the lamp
> failure. I'm going to put a UPS on the set, I have one on all of my
> computers so I might as well put one on the set.

A UPS is not a bad idea, but if you are in a lightning prone area make sure
that it has adequate surge suppression and that all incoming lines to the
system are protected. Make sure that your electrical system grounding is in
good condition and that all of the incoming lines are grounded.

Leonard
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 11:51:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.10.28.20.00.41.444277@yahoo.com...
> On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 19:42:39 +0000, K V wrote:
>
> > The replacement bulb is $199 and this problem has been heavily discussed
at
> > avsforum.com
> >
> > -Ken
> >
> > "General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> > news:p an.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com...
> >> My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing I
> >> had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of
course.
> >> The set was manufactured in January and according to the serial number
it
> >> has the modification that was supposed to fix the problem but
apparently
> >> the defect isn't really fixed. The Best Buy service guy just came by
and
> >> replaced the lamp, it's working now. According to him a new lamp is
$410
> >> so I'm already ahead on the warranty which cost $399. At three lamps a
> >> year that $399 warranty is going to buy me $4,800 worth of lamps. BTW
he
> >> says that one of the sources of failure is turning off the line power
so
> >> that the fans don't have a chance to cool the lamp. The usual reason
for
> >> losing line power is that people use the switched outlet on the cable
box.
> >> I don't do that, I power the set from a power strip. However I do have
> >> power failures every month which might have been the reason for the
lamp
> >> failure. I'm going to put a UPS on the set, I have one on all of my
> >> computers so I might as well put one on the set.
> >>
> >>
> Even at $199 it's still worth it. A bulb every 4 months pays for the
> warranty pretty quickly.

If you need to replace a lamp this often then there is a problem with the
set, its operation, or you are getting defective lamps. You should have
been able to get an equivalent warranty for much less than $399, BTW. Best
Buy often is not the best buy. It is good that you feel that you got a good
value, but there are often better deals out there. If you expect to have to
replace a lamp every few months, why would you even own such a product?

Leonard
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 7:41:19 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 07:51:06 -0400, Leonard Caillouet wrote:

>
> "General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:p an.2004.10.28.20.00.41.444277@yahoo.com...
>> On Thu, 28 Oct 2004 19:42:39 +0000, K V wrote:
>>
>> > The replacement bulb is $199 and this problem has been heavily discussed
> at
>> > avsforum.com
>> >
>> > -Ken
>> >
>> > "General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> > news:p an.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com...
>> >> My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing I
>> >> had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of
> course.
>> >> The set was manufactured in January and according to the serial number
> it
>> >> has the modification that was supposed to fix the problem but
> apparently
>> >> the defect isn't really fixed. The Best Buy service guy just came by
> and
>> >> replaced the lamp, it's working now. According to him a new lamp is
> $410
>> >> so I'm already ahead on the warranty which cost $399. At three lamps a
>> >> year that $399 warranty is going to buy me $4,800 worth of lamps. BTW
> he
>> >> says that one of the sources of failure is turning off the line power
> so
>> >> that the fans don't have a chance to cool the lamp. The usual reason
> for
>> >> losing line power is that people use the switched outlet on the cable
> box.
>> >> I don't do that, I power the set from a power strip. However I do have
>> >> power failures every month which might have been the reason for the
> lamp
>> >> failure. I'm going to put a UPS on the set, I have one on all of my
>> >> computers so I might as well put one on the set.
>> >>
>> >>
>> Even at $199 it's still worth it. A bulb every 4 months pays for the
>> warranty pretty quickly.
>
> If you need to replace a lamp this often then there is a problem with the
> set, its operation, or you are getting defective lamps. You should have
> been able to get an equivalent warranty for much less than $399, BTW. Best
> Buy often is not the best buy. It is good that you feel that you got a good
> value, but there are often better deals out there. If you expect to have to
> replace a lamp every few months, why would you even own such a product?
>
> Leonard

I expected to replace it at least twice in the four years of the warranty,
I didn't expect to have to replace it in four months. Two bulbs would be
break even so I figured the warranty was a good bet, however assuming that
I didn't just have a freak experience it looks like the warranty is going
to be a huge win. All of the projection sets use similar lamps so there is
no reason to believe that one brand is likely to be more reliable. If you
buy an HDTV today you can expect that it's going to be massively
unreliable, there aren't any proven technologies yet. The projection sets
all use these light bulbs that cost as much as a convetional TV, the
Plasma sets burn in (something that is explicitly not covered by Best
Buy's extended warranty), the LCDs are probably a bit more reliable but
they aren't big enough to give you an HDTV experience.
Anonymous
October 30, 2004 5:42:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

>If you
> buy an HDTV today you can expect that it's going to be massively
> unreliable, there aren't any proven technologies yet. The projection sets
> all use these light bulbs that cost as much as a convetional TV, the
> Plasma sets burn in (something that is explicitly not covered by Best
> Buy's extended warranty), the LCDs are probably a bit more reliable but
> they aren't big enough to give you an HDTV experience.

I think that's a bit of an overstatement. In general, they are certainly
less reliable than the CRT technology which has had most of a century to be
perfected to a point where they are now as sturdy as toasters. But there is
a huge payoff, IMO, for taking on a reasonable amount of predicted
unreliability. Life is trade-offs.

I can remember when my family got our first TV, in the early 1950's. Those
sets were pretty unreliable. As I child, I went with my father on more than
one occasion when he took all the tubes out of our set and took them down to
the 7-11 to check them on a tube-tester and replace the bad one. He spent
countless hours adjusting the set from behind it, using a mirror propped
against the couch to see the picture. None of this stopped us, or anyone
else, from buying a TV.

(Which is not to say that we might not have been better off had we
resisted.)

mack
austin
October 31, 2004 1:06:24 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In article <f8qgd.92112$tU4.30883@okepread06>,
"Leonard Caillouet" <no@no.com> wrote:

> > Even at $199 it's still worth it. A bulb every 4 months pays for the
> > warranty pretty quickly.
>
> If you need to replace a lamp this often then there is a problem with the
> set, its operation, or you are getting defective lamps. You should have
> been able to get an equivalent warranty for much less than $399, BTW. Best
> Buy often is not the best buy. It is good that you feel that you got a good
> value, but there are often better deals out there. If you expect to have to
> replace a lamp every few months, why would you even own such a product?
>
> Leonard

Wouldn't the Sony warranty have covered it anyways?
Anonymous
October 31, 2004 1:06:25 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 23:06:24 +0000, poldy wrote:

> In article <f8qgd.92112$tU4.30883@okepread06>,
> "Leonard Caillouet" <no@no.com> wrote:
>
>> > Even at $199 it's still worth it. A bulb every 4 months pays for the
>> > warranty pretty quickly.
>>
>> If you need to replace a lamp this often then there is a problem with the
>> set, its operation, or you are getting defective lamps. You should have
>> been able to get an equivalent warranty for much less than $399, BTW. Best
>> Buy often is not the best buy. It is good that you feel that you got a good
>> value, but there are often better deals out there. If you expect to have to
>> replace a lamp every few months, why would you even own such a product?
>>
>> Leonard
>
> Wouldn't the Sony warranty have covered it anyways?

The Sony warranty doesn't cover in home service, I wouldn't want to try
and shlep a 50" TV anywhere. It certainly wouldn't fit in my car. Also the
Sony warranty is only good for a year, the Best Buy warranty lasts for 4
years.
Anonymous
October 31, 2004 12:18:01 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.10.31.00.20.29.892937@yahoo.com...
> On Sat, 30 Oct 2004 23:06:24 +0000, poldy wrote:
>
> > In article <f8qgd.92112$tU4.30883@okepread06>,
> > "Leonard Caillouet" <no@no.com> wrote:
> >
> >> > Even at $199 it's still worth it. A bulb every 4 months pays for the
> >> > warranty pretty quickly.
> >>
> >> If you need to replace a lamp this often then there is a problem with
the
> >> set, its operation, or you are getting defective lamps. You should
have
> >> been able to get an equivalent warranty for much less than $399, BTW.
Best
> >> Buy often is not the best buy. It is good that you feel that you got a
good
> >> value, but there are often better deals out there. If you expect to
have to
> >> replace a lamp every few months, why would you even own such a product?
> >>
> >> Leonard
> >
> > Wouldn't the Sony warranty have covered it anyways?
>
> The Sony warranty doesn't cover in home service, I wouldn't want to try
> and shlep a 50" TV anywhere. It certainly wouldn't fit in my car. Also the
> Sony warranty is only good for a year, the Best Buy warranty lasts for 4
> years.

That's news to me. Have you received a notice from Sony saying that their
warranty has changed? I am a Sony ASC and for as long as I can remember all
big screens have been in-home service. I must have missed that memo.

Seems like you are spending a lot of effort to convince others that your
purchase of the extended warranty was a good value. That's ok. Its your
opinion and you have a right to say whatever you want and I have no problem
with it...until you start spreading information that is WRONG! Please do
your homework.

Leonard
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 10:39:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

> I bought the Sears service contract for my set, so if I have a problem from
> day one to day 1095, I'll just call Sears.
>

From what I have read and heard, Sears seems to have the best warrenty
program around.
I have said it before, but my next TV (probably an HDTV) will come
from these guys. And on the website, it says they have free shipping
(w/ rebate):
http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/vertical.do?BV_UseBVCook...

How can you beat that?
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 11:23:20 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message news:<pan.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com>...
> My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing I
> had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of course.

The set was still under MFG warranty after 4months, therefore the
extended warranty gained you nothing.
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 11:31:33 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Larry Bud" <larrybud2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:5db363e0.0411010823.181e3a9d@posting.google.com...
> General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:<pan.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com>...
> > My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing I
> > had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of
course.
>
> The set was still under MFG warranty after 4months, therefore the
> extended warranty gained you nothing.

Money-wise, the extended warranty does not gain you anything, in theory at
least, until the manufacturer's warranty runs out. You are just
double-paying during that time. But taking advantage of the manufacturer's
warranty may involve calling up the manufacturer and dealing with people
there, then dealing with a local service rep. This could be very easy or
very difficult, depending on your location. With a good extended warranty,
such as that from Sears -- according to their reputation, not personal
experience -- you just make one call to them and they come out and fix your
problem. As always, in theory, of course. For some people the money is
more important, for others the convenience and feeling of security is more
important.

mack
austin
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 11:31:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Mon, 01 Nov 2004 20:31:33 +0000, Mack McKinnon wrote:


> "Larry Bud" <larrybud2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:5db363e0.0411010823.181e3a9d@posting.google.com...
>> General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:<pan.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com>...
>> > My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing
>> > I had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of
> course.
>>
>> The set was still under MFG warranty after 4months, therefore the
>> extended warranty gained you nothing.
>
> Money-wise, the extended warranty does not gain you anything, in theory
> at least, until the manufacturer's warranty runs out. You are just
> double-paying during that time. But taking advantage of the
> manufacturer's warranty may involve calling up the manufacturer and
> dealing with people there, then dealing with a local service rep. This
> could be very easy or very difficult, depending on your location. With
> a good extended warranty, such as that from Sears -- according to their
> reputation, not personal experience -- you just make one call to them
> and they come out and fix your problem. As always, in theory, of
> course. For some people the money is more important, for others the
> convenience and feeling of security is more important.
>
> mack
> austin

The extended warranty is for four years not one. If my experience wasn't a
freak and the and the life expectancy of the bulb is really only 4 or five
months then the exteneded warranty will end up paying for an extra 9
bulbs, i.e. $1800 worth of bulbs. Even if the bulbs last the stated life
time of 4000 hours, that's less than a year if you assume 6 hours/day.
That works out to 3-4 bulbs during the life of the extended warranty (4 if
the first one were to fail in slightly over 12 months from the purchase,
3 if it fails in just under 12 months). Normally extended warranties are a
ripoff, but that assumes that the underlying technology is fundimentally
reliable. The problem with HDTV is that there are no reliable technologies
yet. All of the modern projection sets use the same lamps so they all have
the same achiles heal. In five years the problem will have to be solved
one way or the other, either through a much more reliable lamp technology,
or alternatively though a much cheaper lamp. If the lamps cost $10 instead
of $200 it wouldn't be an issue. But until the lamp price comes down these
extended warranties are a great deal.
Anonymous
November 1, 2004 11:31:35 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Mon, 01 Nov 2004 16:56:29 -0500, General Schvantzkoph wrote:

> On Mon, 01 Nov 2004 20:31:33 +0000, Mack McKinnon wrote:
>
>
>> "Larry Bud" <larrybud2002@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:5db363e0.0411010823.181e3a9d@posting.google.com...
>>> General Schvantzkoph <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
>> news:<pan.2004.10.28.18.54.26.490177@yahoo.com>...
>>> > My 4 month old Sony 50" LCD set died on Friday, worst possible timing
>>> > I had to watch the World Series on my old 25" TV. It was the bulb of
>> course.
>>>
>>> The set was still under MFG warranty after 4months, therefore the
>>> extended warranty gained you nothing.
>>
>> Money-wise, the extended warranty does not gain you anything, in theory
>> at least, until the manufacturer's warranty runs out. You are just
>> double-paying during that time. But taking advantage of the
>> manufacturer's warranty may involve calling up the manufacturer and
>> dealing with people there, then dealing with a local service rep. This
>> could be very easy or very difficult, depending on your location. With
>> a good extended warranty, such as that from Sears -- according to their
>> reputation, not personal experience -- you just make one call to them
>> and they come out and fix your problem. As always, in theory, of
>> course. For some people the money is more important, for others the
>> convenience and feeling of security is more important.
>>
>> mack
>> austin
>
> The extended warranty is for four years not one. If my experience wasn't a
> freak and the and the life expectancy of the bulb is really only 4 or five
> months then the exteneded warranty will end up paying for an extra 9
> bulbs, i.e. $1800 worth of bulbs. Even if the bulbs last the stated life
> time of 4000 hours, that's less than a year if you assume 6 hours/day.

Sorry I did my math wrong, it's two years at 6 hours a day (which is the
average American's TV usage). So it comes our to two bulbs which is break
even. If you use the set more than 6 hours a day or the life expectancy is
really much less than 4000 hours then you win big on the warranty.
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 12:52:49 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:p an.2004.11.01.21.56.27.49351@yahoo.com...
> The extended warranty is for four years not one.

The first year is covered by the manufacturer, so you really have a three
year extended warranty.

> If my experience wasn't a
> freak and the and the life expectancy of the bulb is really only 4 or five
> months then the exteneded warranty will end up paying for an extra 9
> bulbs, i.e. $1800 worth of bulbs. Even if the bulbs last the stated life

Even the most pessimistic estimates would not approach this frequency of
lamp changes.

> time of 4000 hours, that's less than a year if you assume 6 hours/day.
> That works out to 3-4 bulbs during the life of the extended warranty (4 if
> the first one were to fail in slightly over 12 months from the purchase,
> 3 if it fails in just under 12 months). Normally extended warranties are a
> ripoff, but that assumes that the underlying technology is fundimentally
> reliable. The problem with HDTV is that there are no reliable technologies

Simply not true. What makes the extended warranty make sense is that the
cost to repair some failures can be catastrophic in some of the new
technologies. The risk is greater in terms of potential costs, but all of
the new technologies seem to be at least as reliable as CRT based sets, IME.
We have sold many dozens of PDP, LCD, & DLP products and they have been very
reliable. Lamp replacement is an expected cost, of course, and if an
extended warranty covers this, it makes it more likely to be a good value.

> yet. All of the modern projection sets use the same lamps so they all have
> the same achiles heal. In five years the problem will have to be solved
> one way or the other, either through a much more reliable lamp technology,
> or alternatively though a much cheaper lamp. If the lamps cost $10 instead
> of $200 it wouldn't be an issue. But until the lamp price comes down these
> extended warranties are a great deal.

A good deal as long as they cover it. Look for fewer and fewer of them to
do so as the warranty companies figure it out. Many will not cover the lamp
now.

Leonard
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 6:23:55 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote

>I'm going to put a UPS on the set, I have one on all of my
> computers so I might as well put one on the set.

What type/brand of UPS are you going to use for your TV?

mack
austin
Anonymous
November 2, 2004 6:23:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Tue, 02 Nov 2004 03:23:55 +0000, Mack McKinnon wrote:

>
> "General Schvantzkoph" <schvantzkoph@yahoo.com> wrote
>
>>I'm going to put a UPS on the set, I have one on all of my
>> computers so I might as well put one on the set.
>
> What type/brand of UPS are you going to use for your TV?
>
> mack
> austin

I put 900VA Conext on it, Comp USA had them on sale for $99. Conext is
made by APC, I expect it's a Comp USA house branded version of an APC.
!