converting vinyl to digital

Hello everyone. I have a Tascam US-122 interface, can someone tell me in the simplest way how/if i can convert my vinyl (from my record decks) to sound files on my laptop. Thanks.
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More about converting vinyl digital
  1. With the first option, make sure that:

    1. Your turntable has a built-in RIAA pre-amp or

    2. You feed the turntable into an amplifier first and feed the tape out into the box.
  2. so i could go from record deck to my mixer to my hi-fi amp to the box (ripper) you suggested
  3. im not going to repeat everything i said here

    click on me for some info

    whatever was said there applies to desktop pc's as well as laptops - though i think you will get better results with a desktop with a nice sound card

    and yes it will work from turntable --> mixer --> line level inputs of usb interface --> pc software - since the mixer probably has a phono stage with RIAA equalisation/pre-amplification

    id also suggest recording them in wav. format and then to save space after whatever processing yo want to do ie declicking and pop and hiss reduction etc then thereafter converting to mp3 or wma or ogg vorbis or whichever file you prefer to store your music in
  4. ok, thanks
  5. I do a lot of DJ'ing and the way I have mine set up is this:
    Sorry if I repeat something that someone said earlier, but here it is...

    RCA's out of mixer -> adapter from rca male to 1/8" male.
    Plug 1/8" male plug into line in connector on audio card.
    Now, you can use sound recorder that came from Windows, or your audio card might have come with some recording software (Creative has the Recording Center or whatever).
    When you record your sound, it's best to do it in WAV format at the highest setting to preserve the sound and FEEL of the vinyl. You will hear the hisses and pits in the record, for instance.
    After you record it into a WAV file (yeah, I know they're huge...) just take it to an MP3 encoder and let it do it's thing if you want, or if you want to keep the recording pure, just burn it off onto CD and it will stay in good shape.
    Your audio card DOES make a difference with the quality of the sampling. Yeah, you can record at 96khz on any audio card, but if you are a true audiophile, you can tell the subtle differences. An Audigy Platinum with the Audigy Drive is what I use so that I have pre-amp 1/4" inputs also for adding guitars, mics, etc...

    I'm not too familiar with the Tascam Us-122, but I know that the best way to hook up anything in a studio is with the analog line connectors, but only pretty high dollar audio card/ PC interfaces will accept them.
  6. thanks Jumbles
  7. no problem
  8. Quote:
    I do a lot of DJ'ing and the way I have mine set up is this:
    Sorry if I repeat something that someone said earlier, but here it is...

    RCA's out of mixer -> adapter from rca male to 1/8" male.
    Plug 1/8" male plug into line in connector on audio card.
    Now, you can use sound recorder that came from Windows, or your audio card might have come with some recording software (Creative has the Recording Center or whatever).
    When you record your sound, it's best to do it in WAV format at the highest setting to preserve the sound and FEEL of the vinyl. You will hear the hisses and pits in the record, for instance.
    After you record it into a WAV file (yeah, I know they're huge...) just take it to an MP3 encoder and let it do it's thing if you want, or if you want to keep the recording pure, just burn it off onto CD and it will stay in good shape.
    Your audio card DOES make a difference with the quality of the sampling. Yeah, you can record at 96khz on any audio card, but if you are a true audiophile, you can tell the subtle differences. An Audigy Platinum with the Audigy Drive is what I use so that I have pre-amp 1/4" inputs also for adding guitars, mics, etc...

    I'm not too familiar with the Tascam Us-122, but I know that the best way to hook up anything in a studio is with the analog line connectors, but only pretty high dollar audio card/ PC interfaces will accept them.


    I do the same procedure for my X-fi card. Mostly just to put mixes and stuff onto my ipod. I'm using the Creative Recorder also. Try to minimize the number of different connections the audio must travel through.
    Turntable>Mixer>RCA to 1/8">Sound Card/Audio input seems the easiest.
    They have those fancy turntables with digital output or a preamp standard also.
  9. I realize that digitizing your vinyl records is a great thing to do in order archive the music, but I wonder how many people here know how good vinyl can sound. There are so few people who have heard the imaging and a good soundstage that vinyl can provide. It is sad. I wish you could all sit in a darkened room and hear the piano in the foreground, the drum kit in the background, the bass off to the right and the singer off to the left. Sometimes it is so palpable and coherent that it makes the hair on your neck stand up. Some cds can now do this, but it takes a good (do not necessarily think expensive) system. MP3s are comparatively a blurring, distant picture through a haze. If you must encode please try FLAC or OGG.
  10. i haven't tried those media types. Maybe i will.
    But i still listen to my vinyl at home straight off the needle. Its only when i'm on the road, or at work i use mp3.
  11. http://www.cdfreaks.com/news/Vinyl-sales-up-as-music-lovers-get-fed-up-with-DRM.html


    With the DRM situation I am half seriously considering restricting my music purchases to vinyl instead of CD. At the least it is something to think about doing.
  12. Thats a great article for the digital vs analog debate. Down with DRM!! :twisted:
    I buy vinyl all the time. Old and new.
  13. The tascam is the usb audio interface? It is much better to plug the phono out through an analog preamp before the a/d converter. Just plugging the phonograph into the line in preamp with an adapter and adjusting the master volume down and the line in volume to get the sound you like can work. If you have the rest of the stereo and a good preamp, you will get a recording more like what you want. Many wave editors have an riaa equalization to flatten the frequency response of a direct from cartridge recording that will have very low bass frequency levels.
  14. Thank god someone realizes what MP3's do to music. The only portable music player I'd get is the Zune because it will allow you to store WMA files on it. I've never heard of FLAC or OOG but I'll have to look into those.
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