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Dial-up for Linux

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July 22, 2006 3:34:19 PM

I'm using FC5 Linux, but there is no Internet Connection Wizard in my System Tools. I have no idea why the helpful little guy isn't there, but I sure wish he was! :^( Is it still possible for me to get the Wizard on my computer?

Or is there another way for me to manually dial out a connection?

More about : dial linux

a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 5:31:44 PM

Quote:
I'm using FC5 Linux, but there is no Internet Connection Wizard in my System Tools. I have no idea why the helpful little guy isn't there, but I sure wish he was! :^( Is it still possible for me to get the Wizard on my computer?

Or is there another way for me to manually dial out a connection?




Install the system-config-network RPM from your FC5 Install CDs or DVD.

GL :-D
July 22, 2006 5:51:30 PM

Do you happen to know which CD it's on?
Related resources
a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 6:02:30 PM

Quote:
Do you happen to know which CD it's on?



Sorry I do not.


Put each CD in the drive and run

[code:1:c0e6148c31]

find /media/ -iname "system-config-network*"

[/code:1:c0e6148c31]
July 22, 2006 6:48:20 PM

Now I really feel like a Linux noob...

I tried to follow your instructions, but I can't find where to run that line. :^( Do I enter it into a Windows-esque "Run" feature? If so, how do I access it? Or is it more like a command.com prompt (and how would I access this)?

Thank you very much for helping me this far. :^)
a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 7:05:13 PM

Quote:
Now I really feel like a Linux noob...

I tried to follow your instructions, but I can't find where to run that line. :^( Do I enter it into a Windows-esque "Run" feature? If so, how do I access it? Or is it more like a command.com prompt (and how would I access this)?

Thank you very much for helping me this far. :^)



Click Applications -> System Tools -> Terminal at the top left

That will bring up a command prompt where you can run the find command.

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Linux

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Linux_Guide/Using_the_shel...

GL :-D
July 22, 2006 7:31:51 PM

If I were standing next to you right now, I would hug you. :^) THANKS!!!
a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 7:45:16 PM

Quote:
If I were standing next to you right now, I would hug you. :^) THANKS!!!



yw :-D
July 22, 2006 7:57:56 PM

Alright...

I just took a break from reading those links you posted to see what damage I could do to my computer and... I don't have "Terminal" in my System Tools.

:^( Any ideas?
a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 8:16:17 PM

Quote:
Alright...

I just took a break from reading those links you posted to see what damage I could do to my computer and... I don't have "Terminal" in my System Tools.

:^( Any ideas?




yikes!

Ok I guess it's not installed....

hit ALT+CTRL+F1 to break out of the GUI and get to a text-only terminal where you can log in with your username and password to run those commands.

You can return to the GUI by hitting ALT+CTRL+F7
July 22, 2006 8:25:34 PM

What else could go wrong?

It won't let me type in a password in the text interface! I enter my login (Tyler), then it asks for my password but I can't type anything in! I hit a hundred keys all over my keyboard and nothing appears on-screen...

I also tried to log in as "root" with the same results. Do you have any more ideas?

When I installed FC5 (last night), I chose to install every single stinking feature that was available to me. I wonder why something as basic a the shell is missing...

Anyway, thanks for sticking with me this far. :^)

[EDIT]
I've just decided that I'm going to reinstall FC5 if I can't solve this problem by 4:00 (30 minutes from now).

Last time I installed it as a server with ALL the bells and whistles, maybe I'll try something different this time... since everything about this install seems to be missing or broken.
a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 8:34:50 PM

Quote:
What else could go wrong?

It won't let me type in a password in the text interface! I enter my login (Tyler), then it asks for my password but I can't type anything in! I hit a hundred keys all over my keyboard and nothing appears on-screen...

I also tried to log in as "root" with the same results. Do you have any more ideas?

When I installed FC5 (last night), I chose to install every single stinking feature that was available to me. I wonder why something as basic a the shell is missing...

Anyway, thanks for sticking with me this far. :^)




The password is not supposed to appear when you type it.

You were in fact typing in the password but the system is not supposed to display the password or even *'s when you type it for security reasons.

So ALT+CTRL+F1

Type in your username ( case sensitive )
Type in your password ( also case sensitive )

hit enter

if you typed your username and password correctly you will be dropped to a command prompt.

:-D
July 22, 2006 8:36:43 PM

How sneaky.

[EDIT]
The search turned up two files on the first disc, and they're both rpm files. I guess I'll try to install them in GUI mode now.

[EDIT]
Guess what... the packages are already installed. So how the heck do I find my Internet Connection Wizard?!
a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 9:09:57 PM

Quote:
How sneaky.

[EDIT]
The search turned up two files on the first disc, and they're both rpm files. I guess I'll try to install them in GUI mode now.



Or on the command line:


yum localinstall /media/whatever/Fedora/RPMS/something.rpm

# where "/media/whatever/Fedora/RPMS/something.rpm" is the path find produced


# or

rpm -Uvh /media/whatever/Fedora/RPMS/something.rpm
July 22, 2006 9:12:09 PM

Guess what... the packages are already installed. So how the heck do I find my Internet Connection Wizard?!

(thought I should post this again in case you didn't see me edit)

Give me a little while, I'm going to try to configure all this crap manually since my wizard is on vacation. I'll post back with my results (hopefully I'll be posting from my Linux computer!)
a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 9:42:01 PM

Quote:
Guess what... the packages are already installed. So how the heck do I find my Internet Connection Wizard?!

(thought I should post this again in case you didn't see me edit)

Give me a little while, I'm going to try to configure all this crap manually since my wizard is on vacation. I'll post back with my results (hopefully I'll be posting from my Linux computer!)




Try Desktop -> Run # I think

/usr/bin/internet-druid


Also Right click next to the spreadsheet icon on the top bar select "+ Add to Panel..."

There you add things to your panel like buttons to bring up a terminal, a logout button, a screenshot button, a lock button, etc
July 22, 2006 10:56:52 PM

Thank you so much for sticking with me all this time.

Unfortunately, the run command you gave me didn't work. So I checked the directory /usr/bin... and there was no "internet-druid." Next I searched my system for a file named "internet-druid" and no results were displayed. :^( A search for "druid" also turned up nothing.

I tried to set up my network manually but was halted before I began...

I put in my modem and I can't figure out how to get Linux to recognize that it exists (I rebooted several times and it's never said a thing about new hardware or anything). I checked the network configuration and it only recognizes my two eth ports... so I don't know what the hell to do.
a b 5 Linux
July 22, 2006 11:24:16 PM

Quote:
Thank you so much for sticking with me all this time.

Unfortunately, the run command you gave me didn't work. So I checked the directory /usr/bin... and there was no "internet-druid." Next I searched my system for a file named "internet-druid" and no results were displayed. :^( A search for "druid" also turned up nothing.

I tried to set up my network manually but was halted before I began...

I put in my modem and I can't figure out how to get Linux to recognize that it exists (I rebooted several times and it's never said a thing about new hardware or anything). I checked the network configuration and it only recognizes my two eth ports... so I don't know what the hell to do.




What kind of modem is it?

What country are you located in?

Do you or your neighbors have access to cable, DSL or any other kind of broadband connection?
July 23, 2006 12:14:26 AM

Quote:
What kind of modem is it?


I'm not sure, I'm trying to check its compatibility with Linux now but I need your help. Can you tell me what this means?

[code:1:b9e8fc1bae]To make it executable:
chmod +x scanModem
Run diagnositics with:
./scanModem[/code:1:b9e8fc1bae]

I need to do whatever that is to the program "scanModem" before I can use it to scan my modem.


Quote:
What country are you located in?


USA

Quote:
Do you or your neighbors have access to cable, DSL or any other kind of broadband connection?


I think DSL is in our area, but we haven't upgraded yet. And I'm borrowing my mom's dial-up connection to do this so any option of switching is, unfortunately, out of the question.
a b 5 Linux
July 23, 2006 12:22:24 AM

Quote:
What kind of modem is it?


I'm not sure, I'm trying to check its compatibility with Linux now but I need your help. Can you tell me what this means?

[code:1:D 6dc32666e]To make it executable:
chmod +x scanModem
Run diagnositics with:
./scanModem[/code:1:D 6dc32666e]

I need to do whatever that is to the program "scanModem" before I can use it to scan my modem.


Quote:
What country are you located in?


USA

Quote:
Do you or your neighbors have access to cable, DSL or any other kind of broadband connection?


I think DSL is in our area, but we haven't upgraded yet. And I'm borrowing my mom's dial-up connection to do this so any option of switching is, unfortunately, out of the question.



just run:

[code:1:D 6dc32666e]
lspci
[/code:1:D 6dc32666e]

that will tell you what kind of modem it is

lspci will list all your devices

no need to run scanModem or anything


Many modems are very unfriendly and may not work very well under Linux.

If you have a windoze PC you can enable internet connection sharing and build a small LAN so both your Linux and Windoze boxes can get on at the same time ( via the windoze box ).
July 23, 2006 12:29:37 AM

I will run lspci as soon as I'm through posting this.

But could you please tell me how to use this scanModem thing? I think they even have Linux drivers for some winmodems, so I have to run this scan to be absolutely sure if I can use it or not... right?
a b 5 Linux
July 23, 2006 12:33:07 AM

Quote:
I will run lspci as soon as I'm through posting this.

But could you please tell me how to use this scanModem thing? I think they even have Linux drivers for some winmodems, so I have to run this scan to be absolutely sure if I can use it or not... right?




Where did you get this scanModem thing? You shouldn't install or run software from random sources.


It is true you can use some winmodems under Linux however do not expect everything to work 100% correctly ( they do not work right under windoze either ).

You may have a even more significant problem. Many ISPs are windoze only so even if you get your modem to work you may not be able to connect to your ISP if they restrict you to windoze.

There may be ways around that.

Of course it varies from ISP to ISP.... who is your ISP anyway?

GL :-D
July 23, 2006 12:48:11 AM

I got the scanModem program from Linmodems and my ISP is Earthlink.

Running lspci didn't work, the file doesn't exist (I even searched). I think it's a feature of the pciutils.rpm package (which I don't have installed), is that on the FC5 install discs?

But I did find the box my modem came in! It's a Zoom V.92 (Model 3025). For Windows XP, ME, 2000, 98, and 95. :^)
a b 5 Linux
July 23, 2006 12:53:27 AM

Quote:
I got the scanModem program from Linmodems and my ISP is Earthlink.

Running lspci didn't work, the file doesn't exist (I even searched). I think it's a feature of the pciutils.rpm package (which I don't have installed), is that on the FC5 install discs?

But I did find the box my modem came in! It's a Zoom V.92 (Model 3025). For Windows XP, ME, 2000, 98, and 95. :^)




Yes you need to rpm -Uvh pciutils-2.2.1-1.2.rpm from the FC5 CDs

If the version on the CDs is slightly older don't worry about it.


You can also

yum localinstall pciutils-2.2.1-1.2.rpm


Both commands assume the rpm is in the current directory


If you have the disk space I would suggest you copy all RPMs from all of the CDs to your hard drive and then

yum localinstall ..........

all the packages you need

:-D
July 23, 2006 1:13:04 AM

I was wrong, I already have the pciutils rpm. So what am I doing wrong? Why can't I find lspci or internet-druid?

Can you give me step-by-step instructions of EXACTLY how you would go about running lspci if you had to?

I'm just opening up the "run application" command line and telling it to run "lspci," but that's obviously wrong wrong wrong.
a b 5 Linux
July 23, 2006 1:16:15 AM

Quote:
I was wrong, I already have the pciutils rpm. So what am I doing wrong? Why can't I find lspci or internet-druid?

Can you give me step-by-step instructions of EXACTLY how you would go about running lspci if you had to?

I'm just opening up the "run application" command line and telling it to run "lspci," but that's obviously wrong wrong wrong.



Try /sbin/lspci

Not sure about internet-druid
July 23, 2006 1:20:24 AM

Okay, I did that. This time it didn't say the file doesn't exist, but really nothing happened. The command line closed, and that's it. No program ever started up.

I'll ask you one last time to please tell me how to run that scanModem program. I thank you for your help thus far, but I'm really getting tired of this and this is my last resort (before buying a new modem).
a b 5 Linux
July 23, 2006 1:30:15 AM

Quote:
Okay, I did that. This time it didn't say the file doesn't exist, but really nothing happened. The command line closed, and that's it. No program ever started up.

I'll ask you one last time to please tell me how to run that scanModem program. I thank you for your help thus far, but I'm really getting tired of this and this is my last resort (before buying a new modem).




You have to open a terminal:

/usr/bin/gnome-terminal

and run:

[code:1:c50fce1035]

wget http://linmodems.technion.ac.il/packages/scanModem.gz

gzip -d scanModem.gz

chmod +x scanModem

./scanModem
[/code:1:c50fce1035]
July 23, 2006 1:46:18 AM

I thank you again for your continued help.

But I guess I'm still not getting the hang of using the terminal. When I type anything like "gzip -d scanModem.gz" or "gunzip scanModem.gz" it says the file or directory was not found...

I have the file "scanModem.gz" on my desktop, how do I get the terminal to gunzip it?

[EDIT]
Nevermind, I'm done tinkering with it.
a b 5 Linux
July 23, 2006 1:50:30 PM

Quote:
[code:1:0e10fe56c6]
wget http://linmodems.technion.ac.il/packages/scanModem.gz

gzip -d scanModem.gz

chmod +x scanModem

./scanModem
[/code:1:0e10fe56c6]


Unfortunately, I don't believe the "wget" part will work as we don't have a network connection (unless I missed something).

Instead, download it on the machine you use to post here and put it on some sort of removable media (usb flash drive? burn to cd?)

Also, in regards to the modem itself: I did some quick searching and it seems as though this modem is indeed a stand-alone, serially-connected affair. Am I right? If it is, things have gotten much simpler to do. If not (i.e. it is in fact a so-called "winmodem" and it offloads much of the modulate/demulate work to the host system) unfortunately you are trying to do one of the most difficult desktop-related setups in all of Linux-dom, the dial-up internet connection on a win-modem.

Looking at the documentation here I believe you are indeed in luck. We need to get a serial comm program up and running on your system and use one of a few apps to talk with the modem making setup easy. But first, can you verify that the modem described in the pdf link is indeed the one you have? (Also note in the user guide linked to there is a section for Linux... good news)
a b 5 Linux
July 23, 2006 5:44:40 PM

Unfortunately you're correct wget isn't going to work since there is no network connectivity :cry:  Duh!
July 23, 2006 9:52:31 PM

I figured that about wget, I had already burnt it to disc and transfered it. :^)

Quote:

If you have the disk space I would suggest you copy all RPMs from all of the CDs to your hard drive and then

yum localinstall ..........

all the packages you need

Would I have to install each package individually? Or can I use the yum localinstall command line to install all of them with one command?

Quote:

Also, in regards to the modem itself: I did some quick searching and it seems as though this modem is indeed a stand-alone, serially-connected affair. Am I right?

I don't know, the modem documentation has very little information about the modem and it doesn't say anything about this. But let's assume your research is correct just to see what happens. ;^)

Quote:
Looking at the documentation here I believe you are indeed in luck. We need to get a serial comm program up and running on your system and use one of a few apps to talk with the modem making setup easy. But first, can you verify that the modem described in the pdf link is indeed the one you have? (Also note in the user guide linked to there is a section for Linux... good news)

I think that guide is meant for my modem... but it doesn't give specific model numbers or anything in the guide so I can't be 100% sure.

Alright, the guide says I need to verify that my modem is working by issuing an AT command (with the use of a program use as Minicom). I have no idea what any of this means and I pray that you guys will continue to assist me. :^)

And I want to thank both of you for helping me despite my obvious level of... *stupid* on this subject.
a b 5 Linux
July 24, 2006 12:41:29 AM

Well, is the modem inside your PC or connected to the PC via a serial cable?

Edit Ijust looked at it again, the guide I linked to was for the wrong model line. It is a winmodem. As such, it's spiraled into the realm of really difficult. I don't have any answers right now, but I'll keep looking into this.
July 24, 2006 1:33:52 AM

The modem is installed on a PCI port on the motherboard.
a b 5 Linux
July 26, 2006 3:40:20 PM

Well, after looking around for a coupla days off and on, it definately seems like you've stepped into one of the most difficult things to accomplish in linux (at least for a desktop user). I already knew setting up a WINmodem was bad, I just didn't realize how bad.

The paths I see are as follows:

1) Difficult, lengthy, and possibly won't work. Preferably find a system where you can chat from (as this will avoid forum-clutter and delays), have either linux_0 (if he's up for it), myself, or both help you through the persnickety process of getting ill-supported hardware running. There are some drivers/apps out there that theoretically can get things rolling, but it's going to take some jostling.

2) Medium, costs money, should work. A company called linuxant sells and supports a linux driver for conexant-based winmodems. I am 95% sure, looking through the documentation I found for your modem that this driver would work. The software itself is free to download, but you would need a license that's $20 and transferable.

3) Medium, costs (possibly more) money, will work. Get a new or used full hardware modem. It does not need to be external, but that is a sure sign that it is a full hardware modem. The Zoom 2948 seems to be a popular one that you can find for as little as $40 in the states (after a quick search, I found it here.

4) Easy, costs more money, other benefits, will work. Upgrade to an ethernet-based ISP. This means broadband. Of course, not always an option.

5) Medium, free to low cost, requires a second Windows machine, will work. Setup a Windows machine to connect with it's modem, implement connection sharing. Both machines would need a NIC card and either a crossover cable or a switch and two patch cables to setup a small LAN. If you don't have another Windows machine, avoid this.

Basically, those are the most plausible options I see.
a b 5 Linux
July 26, 2006 8:48:37 PM

Quote:
Well, after looking around for a coupla days off and on, it definately seems like you've stepped into one of the most difficult things to accomplish in linux (at least for a desktop user). I already knew setting up a WINmodem was bad, I just didn't realize how bad.

The paths I see are as follows:

1) Difficult, lengthy, and possibly won't work. Preferably find a system where you can chat from (as this will avoid forum-clutter and delays), have either linux_0 (if he's up for it), myself, or both help you through the persnickety process of getting ill-supported hardware running. There are some drivers/apps out there that theoretically can get things rolling, but it's going to take some jostling.

2) Medium, costs money, should work. A company called linuxant sells and supports a linux driver for conexant-based winmodems. I am 95% sure, looking through the documentation I found for your modem that this driver would work. The software itself is free to download, but you would need a license that's $20 and transferable.

3) Medium, costs (possibly more) money, will work. Get a new or used full hardware modem. It does not need to be external, but that is a sure sign that it is a full hardware modem. The Zoom 2948 seems to be a popular one that you can find for as little as $40 in the states (after a quick search, I found it here.

4) Easy, costs more money, other benefits, will work. Upgrade to an ethernet-based ISP. This means broadband. Of course, not always an option.

5) Medium, free to low cost, requires a second Windows machine, will work. Setup a Windows machine to connect with it's modem, implement connection sharing. Both machines would need a NIC card and either a crossover cable or a switch and two patch cables to setup a small LAN. If you don't have another Windows machine, avoid this.

Basically, those are the most plausible options I see.




Excellent suggestions! Great job bmouring :-D


I would like to add a couple of options -- not necessarily good ones but here goes:

0. I am not a huge fan of DSL but many telcos are now offering DSL broadband for about $14.99 + tax for 6 months to a year which is pretty much the price of dialup.

1. find a friend or neighbor within line of sight with broadband and use 802.11g to setup a wireless network and share their broadband connection. This is insecure but it would work.

2. find a friend or neighbor within 333ft about 110yards ( 100m ) with a broadband connection and run a couple of strands of CAT5e so you can share their broadband connection.

3. bmouring already suggested this, I'm just adding to it -- find a good old 33.6kbps US Robotics external hardware modem on ebay for a few bux and hook it up to your PC via serial port. I have seen old hardware sell dirt cheap you just have to work on it.

GL :-D
July 27, 2006 3:20:26 PM

What's wrong with DSL?

:p 
a b 5 Linux
July 27, 2006 6:47:46 PM

Quote:
1. find a friend or neighbor within line of sight with broadband and use 802.11g to setup a wireless network and share their broadband connection. This is insecure but it would work.

2. find a friend or neighbor within 333ft about 110yards ( 100m ) with a broadband and run a couple of strands of CAT5e so you can share their broadband connection.


Excellent suggestions, why didn't I think of those :D 
a b 5 Linux
July 27, 2006 7:40:57 PM

Quote:
1. find a friend or neighbor within line of sight with broadband and use 802.11g to setup a wireless network and share their broadband connection. This is insecure but it would work.

2. find a friend or neighbor within 333ft about 110yards ( 100m ) with a broadband and run a couple of strands of CAT5e so you can share their broadband connection.


Excellent suggestions, why didn't I think of those :D 



Hehe :-D

Missing ( and somewhat ridiculous ) options:

4. buy some good old surplus 100Mbps FDDI equipment on ebay cheap and run fiber to your neighbors ( up to 124mi or 200km ).

5. Use single or multimode fiber and run it for 1-2km to the nearest point with broadband.

I know these are a bit extreme but I've rigged some strange stuff in my day :lol: 
a b 5 Linux
July 27, 2006 11:15:43 PM

Three word: IBM Token Ring :) 
a b 5 Linux
July 27, 2006 11:33:13 PM

Quote:
Three word: IBM Token Ring :) 



:lol:  :lol: 

Token Ring :lol: 

Back to ether for a min 10Base5 goes out to 500m about 546 yards or 1640ft. but that would be crazy so I left it out :wink:


PS there are other options but none very good so I left them out. There's always SONET but I doubt one could afford it :-D
a b 5 Linux
July 28, 2006 5:21:57 PM

Like TCP/CP, or Transimission Control Protocol over Carrier Pigeon. A professor of mine actually used that as an example on a test question.
a b 5 Linux
July 28, 2006 5:44:57 PM

Quote:
Like TCP/CP, or Transimission Control Protocol over Carrier Pigeon. A professor of mine actually used that as an example on a test question.




Ah yes! RFC 1149 :-D

IP over Avian Carriers
!