Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Some technical advice an HDTV newbie

Last response: in Home Theatre
Share
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 5:58:27 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

I think I've decided on my choice of LCD TV - the 26" Sharp Aquos LC-26GA4U.

Please have a look at this link:
http://www.sharpusa.com/products/ModelLanding/0,1058,13...

This is part of the description on the website: "Additionally, the LC-26GA4U
is an HDTV Monitor, which means it is compatible with 1080i and 720p signals
from HDTV sources (separate DTV decoder required)."

Does this mean that I need an HDTV decoder in additional to the HD cable
box? Or will the HD receiver that Comcast will give be enough to get HD?

I'm in San Francisco and I know that HBO, Discovery HD and a couple of other
channels are broadcast in HD.

So I wasn't sure whether I would need the TV, a decoder and the Comcast box
or just the TV and the Comcast box to get HD.

Also, if I use a progressive scan DVD player will I be able to see the
movies in HD?
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 9:22:04 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 13:58:27 -0700, "Schizoid Man" <schiz@sf.com>
wrote:

>Does this mean that I need an HDTV decoder in additional to the HD cable
>box? Or will the HD receiver that Comcast will give be enough to get HD?

The HD cable box is sufficient.

>I'm in San Francisco and I know that HBO, Discovery HD and a couple of other
>channels are broadcast in HD.

But does your cable company carry them in HD?

>Also, if I use a progressive scan DVD player will I be able to see the
>movies in HD?

Nope. Currently, DVDs are not HD but you will be able to enjoy them,
as I do, with improved clarity. However, some displays do the
conversion (interlaced-to-progressive) better than some players. Try
it both ways.

Kal
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 9:22:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Kalman Rubinson" <kr4@nyu.edu> wrote in message

> On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 13:58:27 -0700, "Schizoid Man" <schiz@sf.com>
> wrote:
>
> >Does this mean that I need an HDTV decoder in additional to the HD cable
> >box? Or will the HD receiver that Comcast will give be enough to get HD?
>
> The HD cable box is sufficient.
>
> >I'm in San Francisco and I know that HBO, Discovery HD and a couple of
other
> >channels are broadcast in HD.
>
> But does your cable company carry them in HD?
>
> >Also, if I use a progressive scan DVD player will I be able to see the
> >movies in HD?
>
> Nope. Currently, DVDs are not HD but you will be able to enjoy them,
> as I do, with improved clarity. However, some displays do the
> conversion (interlaced-to-progressive) better than some players. Try
> it both ways.
>
> Kal

Thanks, Kal. One more question - the TV set that I am considering is a 720p
(as opposed to a 1080i). Is that a problem?
Related resources
Anonymous
October 29, 2004 9:22:05 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

"Kalman Rubinson" <kr4@nyu.edu> wrote in message...
> On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 13:58:27 -0700, "Schizoid Man" <schiz@sf.com>
> wrote:
>
> >Does this mean that I need an HDTV decoder in additional to the HD cable
> >box? Or will the HD receiver that Comcast will give be enough to get HD?
>
> The HD cable box is sufficient.
>
> >I'm in San Francisco and I know that HBO, Discovery HD and a couple of
other
> >channels are broadcast in HD.
>
> But does your cable company carry them in HD?
>
> >Also, if I use a progressive scan DVD player will I be able to see the
> >movies in HD?
>
> Nope. Currently, DVDs are not HD but you will be able to enjoy them,
> as I do, with improved clarity. However, some displays do the
> conversion (interlaced-to-progressive) better than some players. Try
> it both ways.
>
> Kal

My mistake, Kal. This unit supports both 1080i and 720p.
Anonymous
October 30, 2004 3:12:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 14:30:44 -0700, "Schizoid Man" <schiz@sf.com>
wrote:

>
>"Kalman Rubinson" <kr4@nyu.edu> wrote in message
>
>> On Fri, 29 Oct 2004 13:58:27 -0700, "Schizoid Man" <schiz@sf.com>
>> wrote:
>>
>> >Does this mean that I need an HDTV decoder in additional to the HD cable
>> >box? Or will the HD receiver that Comcast will give be enough to get HD?
>>
>> The HD cable box is sufficient.
>>
>> >I'm in San Francisco and I know that HBO, Discovery HD and a couple of
>other
>> >channels are broadcast in HD.
>>
>> But does your cable company carry them in HD?
>>
>> >Also, if I use a progressive scan DVD player will I be able to see the
>> >movies in HD?
>>
>> Nope. Currently, DVDs are not HD but you will be able to enjoy them,
>> as I do, with improved clarity. However, some displays do the
>> conversion (interlaced-to-progressive) better than some players. Try
>> it both ways.
>>
>> Kal
>
>Thanks, Kal. One more question - the TV set that I am considering is a 720p
>(as opposed to a 1080i). Is that a problem?
>

My panasonic's 1080i is superior to 720 and I watch all broadcasts at
1080i.

I'm also in San Francisco but dumped comcast for directtv. Comcast
offered 1 station on HBO and 1 station on SHO in HD. So does
directtv. Comcast offered PBS, NBC and KGO in hidef. Directtv did
not. Directtv offered Discovery HD, HDNet, HDM and Bravo in hidef,
Comcast did not (not sure about Bravo, it was recently added to
satellite).

The big difference was in the SamSung receiver for DirectTv. It
accepted as input satellite, OTA(off the air) and cable inputs. I
hooked the OTA to a rabbit ear antenna and get FOX, NBC, ABC, PBS and
CBS hidef. On the old comcast recevier I couldn't input the OTA
signal. The OTA's carry the football games which are stunning in
hidef.
Anonymous
October 30, 2004 5:29:10 PM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

A 26" screen is so small that you are not going to really realize the value
of HDTV. One of the great things about HD is that because there are so many
more pixels to convey the information, you can spread the picture out over a
huge screen and it is still very sharp. Unless you have space
considerations that are such that you have to settle for this tiny screen
size, why not go larger so you can see HDTV in its full glory?

mack
austin



"Schizoid Man" <schiz@sf.com> wrote in message
news:cluatk$pg9$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
> I think I've decided on my choice of LCD TV - the 26" Sharp Aquos
LC-26GA4U.
>
> Please have a look at this link:
> http://www.sharpusa.com/products/ModelLanding/0,1058,13...
>
> This is part of the description on the website: "Additionally, the
LC-26GA4U
> is an HDTV Monitor, which means it is compatible with 1080i and 720p
signals
> from HDTV sources (separate DTV decoder required)."
>
> Does this mean that I need an HDTV decoder in additional to the HD cable
> box? Or will the HD receiver that Comcast will give be enough to get HD?
>
> I'm in San Francisco and I know that HBO, Discovery HD and a couple of
other
> channels are broadcast in HD.
>
> So I wasn't sure whether I would need the TV, a decoder and the Comcast
box
> or just the TV and the Comcast box to get HD.
>
> Also, if I use a progressive scan DVD player will I be able to see the
> movies in HD?
>
>
>
Anonymous
October 31, 2004 2:28:47 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

Kalman Rubinson wrote:


>>Also, if I use a progressive scan DVD player will I be able to see the
>>movies in HD?
>
>
> Nope. Currently, DVDs are not HD but you will be able to enjoy them,
> as I do, with improved clarity. However, some displays do the
> conversion (interlaced-to-progressive) better than some players. Try
> it both ways.
>
> Kal

Also remember that by default the DVD unit may be set to interlaced ....
go into setup and change. My Pioneer reverts to interlaced every time
the power is interrupted.

Kurt.




--
** Remove '5555' from address when replying!!!!
Anonymous
October 31, 2004 6:16:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.tv.tech.hdtv (More info?)

In order to appreciate the true value of HDTV you should try and sit
away from the screen at a distance of between 3 and 4 times the screen
height. So, if you had a 27" widescreen tv, the optimal viewing distance
would be 13 inches times 3 or 4. If you are viewing the screen closer
than 3 or 4 feet you would see too many imperfections (artifacts). And
if you were viewing from a distance of 5 feet or greater, your eye would
not be able to perceive the fine resolution displayed. If you are
definately viewing from 6 feet or more and can only buy a 27 inch
display, I would recommend not buying a HDTV - save you money and buy a
more economical SD TV.

Best of luck,
Dave - N2LAK

Mack McKinnon wrote:

> A 26" screen is so small that you are not going to really realize the value
> of HDTV. One of the great things about HD is that because there are so many
> more pixels to convey the information, you can spread the picture out over a
> huge screen and it is still very sharp. Unless you have space
> considerations that are such that you have to settle for this tiny screen
> size, why not go larger so you can see HDTV in its full glory?
>
> mack
> austin
>
>
>
> "Schizoid Man" <schiz@sf.com> wrote in message
> news:cluatk$pg9$1@geraldo.cc.utexas.edu...
>
>>I think I've decided on my choice of LCD TV - the 26" Sharp Aquos
>
> LC-26GA4U.
>
>>Please have a look at this link:
>>http://www.sharpusa.com/products/ModelLanding/0,1058,13...
>>
>>This is part of the description on the website: "Additionally, the
>
> LC-26GA4U
>
>>is an HDTV Monitor, which means it is compatible with 1080i and 720p
>
> signals
>
>>from HDTV sources (separate DTV decoder required)."
>>
>>Does this mean that I need an HDTV decoder in additional to the HD cable
>>box? Or will the HD receiver that Comcast will give be enough to get HD?
>>
>>I'm in San Francisco and I know that HBO, Discovery HD and a couple of
>
> other
>
>>channels are broadcast in HD.
>>
>>So I wasn't sure whether I would need the TV, a decoder and the Comcast
>
> box
>
>>or just the TV and the Comcast box to get HD.
>>
>>Also, if I use a progressive scan DVD player will I be able to see the
>>movies in HD?
>>
>>
>>
>
>
>
!