Lost my XP Home CD but still have the registration key

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

-- I Lost my XP Home CD but still have the registration key is there any way
to get or download a replacement from MS without purchasing new software?
Eagle IT
5 answers Last reply
More about lost home registration
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:C76D8622-2D67-4AC3-AD15-77B35A1BBFB1@microsoft.com,
    Eagle IT <EagleIT@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    > -- I Lost my XP Home CD but still have the registration key is
    > there
    > any way to get or download a replacement from MS without
    > purchasing
    > new software? Eagle IT

    If yours was a retail version, see
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;[ln];326246.


    But if it was an OEM version, Microsoft won't support it and
    you're probably out of luck. However it doesn't hurt to try
    asking the OEM you bought it from if they can replace it.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Hi

    If the XP CD is a Retail one, try here:

    "How to replace lost, broken, or missing Microsoft software or hardware"
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=KB;en-us;326246

    If the CD is an OEM version, you will have to contact your supplier.

    --

    Will Denny
    MS-MVP Windows Shell/User
    Please reply to the News Groups


    "Eagle IT" <EagleIT@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C76D8622-2D67-4AC3-AD15-77B35A1BBFB1@microsoft.com...
    >
    > -- I Lost my XP Home CD but still have the registration key is there any
    > way
    > to get or download a replacement from MS without purchasing new software?
    > Eagle IT
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:OhJm%23fTQFHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> had this to say:

    My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

    > In news:C76D8622-2D67-4AC3-AD15-77B35A1BBFB1@microsoft.com,
    > Eagle IT <EagleIT@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >
    >> -- I Lost my XP Home CD but still have the registration key is
    >> there
    >> any way to get or download a replacement from MS without
    >> purchasing
    >> new software? Eagle IT
    >
    > If yours was a retail version, see
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;[ln];326246.
    >
    >
    >
    > But if it was an OEM version, Microsoft won't support it and
    > you're probably out of luck. However it doesn't hurt to try
    > asking the OEM you bought it from if they can replace it.

    Here's a good place for me to ask my burning question. The license was the
    key? For all intents and purposes? If the OP lost his key could he legally
    copy a friends CD and use that copy of the CD with HIS OWN legit license
    without violating the law? (The EULA isn't "law" but rather what Microsoft
    wants us to do, it's never been tried in court AFAIK thus isn't absolute.)
    Don't get me wrong, I'm not condoning piracy. I'm just trying to understand.
    Failure of the OP to make a backup copy of the work on their own is their
    own fault and to have done so would have been within their legal rights even
    according to the EULA. (Microsoft even has somewhere on their site the
    directions for slipstreaming SP2 I think. So they're not against burning
    copies for your own use and for installation on a single PC according to the
    EULA.)

    This does really beg to be asked and if it has been then I missed it. I
    probably should have brought this to DTS but I'm curious and want to know.
    I'm not expecting anyone from Microsoft to even touch this question in a
    public forum (and I don't blame them.)

    Two questions really. The OP bought the license to the software (we'll
    assume non-OEM for this if you'll allow me that liberty as that's a whole
    other bowl of worms) and the license really wasn't for the medium the data
    was stored on but rather for the actual key. They lost the original
    installation media disc and may have a friend who has another non-OEM
    version of the same identical OS. Is there anything illegal if they copy
    their friends CD and use their own license? If it's not known if it's legal
    or not then does anyone really care if the above case is as stated? I
    carefully avoid the OEM subject in these questions as that just opens up too
    many different possibilities so please allow me the assumption that in the
    disks are full retail products.

    Galen
    --
    Signature changed for a moment of silence.
    Rest well Alex and we'll see you on the other side.
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:O%23h7imeQFHA.1500@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    Galen <galennews@gmail.com> typed:

    > In news:OhJm%23fTQFHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    > Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> had this to say:
    >
    > My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:
    >
    >> In news:C76D8622-2D67-4AC3-AD15-77B35A1BBFB1@microsoft.com,
    >> Eagle IT <EagleIT@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:
    >>
    >>> -- I Lost my XP Home CD but still have the registration key
    >>> is
    >>> there
    >>> any way to get or download a replacement from MS without
    >>> purchasing
    >>> new software? Eagle IT
    >>
    >> If yours was a retail version, see
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;[ln];326246.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> But if it was an OEM version, Microsoft won't support it and
    >> you're probably out of luck. However it doesn't hurt to try
    >> asking the OEM you bought it from if they can replace it.
    >
    > Here's a good place for me to ask my burning question. The
    > license
    > was the key? For all intents and purposes? If the OP lost his
    > key
    > could he legally copy a friends CD and use that copy of the CD
    > with
    > HIS OWN legit license without violating the law? (The EULA
    > isn't
    > "law" but rather what Microsoft wants us to do, it's never been
    > tried
    > in court AFAIK thus isn't absolute.) Don't get me wrong, I'm
    > not
    > condoning piracy. I'm just trying to understand. Failure of the
    > OP to
    > make a backup copy of the work on their own is their own fault
    > and to
    > have done so would have been within their legal rights even
    > according
    > to the EULA. (Microsoft even has somewhere on their site the
    > directions for slipstreaming SP2 I think. So they're not
    > against
    > burning copies for your own use and for installation on a
    > single PC
    > according to the EULA.)
    > This does really beg to be asked and if it has been then I
    > missed it.
    > I probably should have brought this to DTS but I'm curious and
    > want
    > to know. I'm not expecting anyone from Microsoft to even touch
    > this
    > question in a public forum (and I don't blame them.)
    >
    > Two questions really. The OP bought the license to the software
    > (we'll
    > assume non-OEM for this if you'll allow me that liberty as
    > that's a
    > whole other bowl of worms) and the license really wasn't for
    > the
    > medium the data was stored on but rather for the actual key.
    > They
    > lost the original installation media disc and may have a friend
    > who
    > has another non-OEM version of the same identical OS. Is there
    > anything illegal if they copy their friends CD and use their
    > own
    > license? If it's not known if it's legal or not then does
    > anyone
    > really care if the above case is as stated? I carefully avoid
    > the OEM
    > subject in these questions as that just opens up too many
    > different
    > possibilities so please allow me the assumption that in the
    > disks are
    > full retail products.


    I'm not a lawyer, and I certainly don't speak for Microsoft, so
    all I can do is offer my personal view. Yes, the license is the
    key, and if you have a legitimate key, there's nothing wrong with
    borrowing a friend's CD of the same type (Home vs Professional;
    Full vs Upgrade; Retail vs generic OEM) and making a copy of it.
    The result of doing this is exactly the same as if you had been
    prudent enough to copy your own CD for backup purposes in the
    first place, so it's hard for me to see how this could be illegal
    or objected to.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:eNLw7veQFHA.2748@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> had this to say:

    My reply is at the bottom of your sent message:

    > I'm not a lawyer, and I certainly don't speak for Microsoft, so
    > all I can do is offer my personal view. Yes, the license is the
    > key, and if you have a legitimate key, there's nothing wrong with
    > borrowing a friend's CD of the same type (Home vs Professional;
    > Full vs Upgrade; Retail vs generic OEM) and making a copy of it.
    > The result of doing this is exactly the same as if you had been
    > prudent enough to copy your own CD for backup purposes in the
    > first place, so it's hard for me to see how this could be illegal
    > or objected to.

    That's my opinion as well and I don't expect Microsoft to weigh in on this
    in a public forum. Some people might expect them to but I understand the
    business model to some extent and were I in their shoes I'd not say a word
    and I imagine anyone with the [MSFT] after their name (if it's legit as
    we've seen it's not always in the past) who did so would probably be called
    down to either the legal department or to HR for a bit of a lecture.

    I can see, on the other hand, Microsoft objecting to it. While the result is
    the same as if they'd retained the original or made a backup of the disc the
    EULA may be violated but when I read it this clause wasn't specifically
    mentioned. Though there's the exclusion of all rights not expressly granted
    probably. It makes me wonder. Now that I think about it I guess I would like
    an official answer because this isn't a question that's uncommon and I'd
    like a clear answer aside from the typical link to send them to attempt to
    get a replacement product or a stop-gap measure that they can take while
    waiting for their new CD to arrive.

    Galen
    --
    Signature changed for a moment of silence.
    Rest well Alex and we'll see you on the other side.
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