Upgrading to XP Pro

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are my
best bets? Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
full featured version? Or does the full featured version mean I will have
to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch. Also, I
see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
doesn't XP require registration before it will function?

Anyway, trying to sort thru my installation concerns and purchase options
(seem to be as many of those as Carter has pills). I don't mind saving
money, but I'd also like to be legal in the process.

TIA,

Rob
13 answers Last reply
More about upgrading
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    In news:Neb8e.7750$sp3.6092@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net,
    RJ <jackson@aol.com> typed:

    > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate
    > to
    > WindowsXP Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this
    > transistion, what are my best bets? Can I buy the upgrade
    > version,


    Yes.


    > or can I also upgrade using a full featured version?


    The Full (retail) version can also do an upgrade. However it
    costs more and contains exactly the same software as the Upgrade
    version; only the installation routine and the rules for using it
    differ (to do a clean installation with the upgrade version you
    have to have a CD of a previous qualifying version). So if you
    qualify to use the Upgrade version, buying the Full version would
    be a waste of money.


    > Or does the
    > full featured version mean I will have to pretty much wipe out
    > my
    > harddrive and then start from scratch.


    No. It will do either a clean installation or an upgrade.


    > Also, I see many folks
    > selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
    > the COE
    > required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?


    You mean COA, not COE. If it comes without a COA, it's not a
    legal version.

    Note that it requires activation, not registration. Registration
    is always completely optional. But you have to activate within 30
    days of installation or it will cease to function except in safe
    mode.

    Note that the OEM version will *not* do an upgrade, just a clean
    installation. Its license also ties it to the first machine it's
    installed on, and it can never legally be sold, given away, or
    moved to another machine. For that reason, and because it costs
    only slightly less than an Upgrade version, I think it's a much
    poorer deal.


    > Anyway, trying to sort thru my installation concerns and
    > purchase
    > options (seem to be as many of those as Carter has pills). I
    > don't
    > mind saving money, but I'd also like to be legal in the
    > process.


    Clearly, you should buy an Upgrade version.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    RJ wrote:
    > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
    > Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are my
    > best bets?


    Some people will recommend that you perform a clean installation,
    rather than upgrade over an earlier OS. For the most part, I feel that
    these people, while well-meaning, are living in the past, and are basing
    their recommendation on their experiences with older operating systems.
    You'd probably save a lot of time by upgrading your PC to WinXP,
    rather than performing a clean installation, if you've no hardware or
    software incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved (over earlier
    versions of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly upgrade an earlier OS.

    WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
    system while simultaneously preserving your applications and data, and
    translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
    designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things can
    go wrong, in a small number of cases. If your data is at all important
    to you, back it up before proceeding. And if, for some reason, the
    upgrade doesn't pan out, you can always perform a clean installation later.

    Have you made sure that your PC's hardware components are capable
    of supporting WinXP? This information will be found at the PC's
    manufacturer's web site, and on Microsoft's Windows Catalog:
    (http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx) Additionally, run
    Microsoft WinXP Upgrade Advisor to see if you have any incompatible
    hardware components or applications.

    You should, before proceeding, take a few minutes to ensure that
    there are WinXP device drivers available for all of the machine's
    components. There may not be, if the PC was specifically designed for
    Win98/Me. Also bear in mind that PCs designed for, sold and run fine
    with Win9x/Me very often do not meet WinXP's much more stringent
    hardware quality requirements. This is particularly true of many models
    in Compaq's consumer-class Presario product line or HP's consumer-class
    Pavilion product line. WinXP, like WinNT and Win2K before it, is quite
    sensitive to borderline defective or substandard hardware (particularly
    motherboards, RAM and hard drives) that will still support Win9x.

    HOW TO Prepare to Upgrade Win98 or WinMe
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q316639

    Upgrading to Windows XP
    http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpupgrad.htm


    > Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    > full featured version?


    You can perform an upgrade from Win98 using either the WinXP Pro
    Upgrade or the WinXP Pro Full Retail versions. It's even possible,
    should it ever become necessary or desirable at some future time, to
    perform a clean installation using the Upgrade CD. (The Upgrade CD
    checks to see if a qualifying OS is installed, and, if it finds none,
    asks you to insert the installation media (CD) of that earlier OS.
    Unfortunately, an OEM "Recovery/Restore" CD will not work for this
    purpose; you must have a true installation CD, complete with the
    "\Win98" folder and *.cab files.) That being the case, the more
    economical option would be to purchase an Upgrade license.


    > Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    > to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch.


    Not unless you elect to further cut costs by purchasing an OEM license.
    There are some very important reasons that an OEM license costs so
    much less than a retail license. OEM licenses are very limited:

    1) OEM versions must be sold with a piece of non-peripheral
    hardware (normally a motherboard or hard drive, if not an entire PC,
    although Microsoft has greatly relaxed the hardware criteria for WinXP)
    and are _permanently_ bound to the first PC on which they are installed.
    An OEM license, once installed, is not legally transferable to another
    computer under any circumstances. This is the main reason some people
    avoid OEM versions; if the PC dies or is otherwise disposed of (even
    stolen), you cannot re-use your OEM license on a new PC. The only
    legitimate way to transfer the ownership of an OEM license is to
    transfer ownership of the entire PC.

    2) Microsoft provides no free support for OEM versions. If you
    have any problems that require outside assistance, your only recourse is
    to contact the manufacturer/builder of the PC or the seller of the OEM
    license. This would include such issues as lost a Product Key or
    replacing a damaged installation CD. (Microsoft does some make
    allowances for those instances when you can prove that the OEM has gone
    out of business.) This doesn't mean that you can't download patches and
    service packs from Microsoft -- just no free telephone or email support
    for problems with the OS.

    3) An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an earlier
    OS, as it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty hard drive.
    It can still be used to perform a repair installation (a.k.a. an
    in-place upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.

    4) If the OEM CD was designed by a specific manufacturer, such as
    eMachines, Sony, Dell, Gateway, etc., it will most likely only install
    on the same brand of PC, as an additional anti-piracy feature. Further,
    such CDs are severely customized to contain only the minimum of device
    drivers, and a lot of extra nonsense, that the manufacturer feels
    necessary for the specific model of PC for which the CD was designed.
    (To be honest, such CDs should _not_ be available on the open market;
    but, if you're shopping someplace on-line like eBay, swap meets, or
    computer fairs, there's often no telling what you're buying until it's
    too late.) The "generic" OEM CDs, such as are manufactured by Microsoft
    and sold to small systems builders, don't have this particular problem,
    though, and are pretty much the same as their retail counterparts, apart
    from the licensing, support, and upgrading restrictions.


    > Also, I
    > see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
    > the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    >


    Correct, in essence, although it's "Activation" that's required;
    registration is entirely optional. If you see someone selling an OEM CD
    without the CoA and Product Key, all they're really selling is a rather
    over-priced, non-absorbent coaster. No CoA and Product Key = No
    License. The CD by itself is useless. If you're shopping on eBay, be
    very careful, as eBay makes no prior effort to ensure that such sales
    are legitimate; they react only when someone files a complaint. (And
    then all that really happens is the seller of the pirated software
    returns using a different alias, to continue selling illegitimate copies.)


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  3. Archived from groups: public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Hi RJ,

    There is no need to cross post to this many newsgroups.

    Cross posting trimmed.

    Your best bet is to take a look at this article before proceeding.

    Upgrading to Windows XP By Gary Woodruff MS-MVP:
    http://www.aumha.org/a/xpupgradz.htm

    --
    Regards,
    Bert Kinney MS-MVP Shell/User
    http://dts-l.org/

    RJ wrote:
    > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to
    > migrate to WindowsXP Pro. If I want to minimize the
    > effort to make this transistion, what are my best bets?
    > Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade
    > using a full featured version? Or does the full featured
    > version mean I will have to pretty much wipe out my
    > harddrive and then start from scratch. Also, I see many
    > folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the
    > COE....isn't the COE required before the program will be
    > able to be registered, and doesn't XP require
    > registration before it will function?
    >
    > Anyway, trying to sort thru my installation concerns and
    > purchase options (seem to be as many of those as Carter
    > has pills). I don't mind saving money, but I'd also like
    > to be legal in the process.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Rob
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    Given Bruce's extensive material regarding the 'caveats' of upgrading etc etc
    etc etc.

    The basic answer to your question is:

    1. You can purchase a full retail version of XP and install it over the top
    of your 98 and not loose any applications or files [subject to caveats and
    etcs as in the bible of Bruce]. There are 2 versions - XP Pro [most money]
    or XP Home [less money]

    2. You qualify to use a Windows XP Pro Upgrade version [less money than
    either of 1.] and install it as an upgrade to your 98 and not loose any
    applications or files. It runs under 98 [just as any other application
    installation would - but also provides an option to check for compatibility
    etc - as Bruce says: run this to be safe].

    3. You may also qualify to use a Windows XP Upgarde Academic Edition [least
    expensive option of all] and install it as an upgrade to your 98 and not
    loose any applications or files. It runs under 98 [just as any other
    application installation would - but also provides an option to check for
    compatibility etc - as Bruce says: run this to be safe]. This is effectively
    the same as 2 but has a price advantage for the academic community or members
    / participants thereof.


    "Bruce Chambers" wrote:

    > RJ wrote:
    > > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
    > > Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are my
    > > best bets?
    >
    >
    > Some people will recommend that you perform a clean installation,
    > rather than upgrade over an earlier OS. For the most part, I feel that
    > these people, while well-meaning, are living in the past, and are basing
    > their recommendation on their experiences with older operating systems.
    > You'd probably save a lot of time by upgrading your PC to WinXP,
    > rather than performing a clean installation, if you've no hardware or
    > software incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved (over earlier
    > versions of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly upgrade an earlier OS.
    >
    > WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
    > system while simultaneously preserving your applications and data, and
    > translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
    > designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things can
    > go wrong, in a small number of cases. If your data is at all important
    > to you, back it up before proceeding. And if, for some reason, the
    > upgrade doesn't pan out, you can always perform a clean installation later.
    >
    > Have you made sure that your PC's hardware components are capable
    > of supporting WinXP? This information will be found at the PC's
    > manufacturer's web site, and on Microsoft's Windows Catalog:
    > (http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx) Additionally, run
    > Microsoft WinXP Upgrade Advisor to see if you have any incompatible
    > hardware components or applications.
    >
    > You should, before proceeding, take a few minutes to ensure that
    > there are WinXP device drivers available for all of the machine's
    > components. There may not be, if the PC was specifically designed for
    > Win98/Me. Also bear in mind that PCs designed for, sold and run fine
    > with Win9x/Me very often do not meet WinXP's much more stringent
    > hardware quality requirements. This is particularly true of many models
    > in Compaq's consumer-class Presario product line or HP's consumer-class
    > Pavilion product line. WinXP, like WinNT and Win2K before it, is quite
    > sensitive to borderline defective or substandard hardware (particularly
    > motherboards, RAM and hard drives) that will still support Win9x.
    >
    > HOW TO Prepare to Upgrade Win98 or WinMe
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q316639
    >
    > Upgrading to Windows XP
    > http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpupgrad.htm
    >
    >
    > > Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    > > full featured version?
    >
    >
    > You can perform an upgrade from Win98 using either the WinXP Pro
    > Upgrade or the WinXP Pro Full Retail versions. It's even possible,
    > should it ever become necessary or desirable at some future time, to
    > perform a clean installation using the Upgrade CD. (The Upgrade CD
    > checks to see if a qualifying OS is installed, and, if it finds none,
    > asks you to insert the installation media (CD) of that earlier OS.
    > Unfortunately, an OEM "Recovery/Restore" CD will not work for this
    > purpose; you must have a true installation CD, complete with the
    > "\Win98" folder and *.cab files.) That being the case, the more
    > economical option would be to purchase an Upgrade license.
    >
    >
    > > Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    > > to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch.
    >
    >
    > Not unless you elect to further cut costs by purchasing an OEM license.
    > There are some very important reasons that an OEM license costs so
    > much less than a retail license. OEM licenses are very limited:
    >
    > 1) OEM versions must be sold with a piece of non-peripheral
    > hardware (normally a motherboard or hard drive, if not an entire PC,
    > although Microsoft has greatly relaxed the hardware criteria for WinXP)
    > and are _permanently_ bound to the first PC on which they are installed.
    > An OEM license, once installed, is not legally transferable to another
    > computer under any circumstances. This is the main reason some people
    > avoid OEM versions; if the PC dies or is otherwise disposed of (even
    > stolen), you cannot re-use your OEM license on a new PC. The only
    > legitimate way to transfer the ownership of an OEM license is to
    > transfer ownership of the entire PC.
    >
    > 2) Microsoft provides no free support for OEM versions. If you
    > have any problems that require outside assistance, your only recourse is
    > to contact the manufacturer/builder of the PC or the seller of the OEM
    > license. This would include such issues as lost a Product Key or
    > replacing a damaged installation CD. (Microsoft does some make
    > allowances for those instances when you can prove that the OEM has gone
    > out of business.) This doesn't mean that you can't download patches and
    > service packs from Microsoft -- just no free telephone or email support
    > for problems with the OS.
    >
    > 3) An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an earlier
    > OS, as it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty hard drive.
    > It can still be used to perform a repair installation (a.k.a. an
    > in-place upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.
    >
    > 4) If the OEM CD was designed by a specific manufacturer, such as
    > eMachines, Sony, Dell, Gateway, etc., it will most likely only install
    > on the same brand of PC, as an additional anti-piracy feature. Further,
    > such CDs are severely customized to contain only the minimum of device
    > drivers, and a lot of extra nonsense, that the manufacturer feels
    > necessary for the specific model of PC for which the CD was designed.
    > (To be honest, such CDs should _not_ be available on the open market;
    > but, if you're shopping someplace on-line like eBay, swap meets, or
    > computer fairs, there's often no telling what you're buying until it's
    > too late.) The "generic" OEM CDs, such as are manufactured by Microsoft
    > and sold to small systems builders, don't have this particular problem,
    > though, and are pretty much the same as their retail counterparts, apart
    > from the licensing, support, and upgrading restrictions.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Also, I
    > > see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
    > > the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    > >
    >
    >
    > Correct, in essence, although it's "Activation" that's required;
    > registration is entirely optional. If you see someone selling an OEM CD
    > without the CoA and Product Key, all they're really selling is a rather
    > over-priced, non-absorbent coaster. No CoA and Product Key = No
    > License. The CD by itself is useless. If you're shopping on eBay, be
    > very careful, as eBay makes no prior effort to ensure that such sales
    > are legitimate; they react only when someone files a complaint. (And
    > then all that really happens is the seller of the pirated software
    > returns using a different alias, to continue selling illegitimate copies.)
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Bruce Chambers
    >
    > Help us help you:
    > http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    > http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    >
    > You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    > both at once. - RAH
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.help_and_support (More info?)

    You cannot upgrade using an OEM version. It simply will not work. You can
    upgrade using either an upgrade version or a full retail version. Check here
    for some basic tips that can ease the upgrade
    http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/upgrade_tips.htm

    --

    Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


    "RJ" <jackson@aol.com> wrote in message
    news:Neb8e.7750$sp3.6092@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
    > Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are
    my
    > best bets? Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    > full featured version? Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    > to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch. Also, I
    > see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the
    COE....isn't
    > the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    >
    > Anyway, trying to sort thru my installation concerns and purchase options
    > (seem to be as many of those as Carter has pills). I don't mind saving
    > money, but I'd also like to be legal in the process.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Rob
    >
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    LOL, you want to go to the Not There aka New Technology source code, RJ --
    well have fun with XP PRO. SP2 and all its frustrations and remember your
    information is less secure there than in 98SE with ZA PRO. with antivirus and
    SpySweeper by Webroot. Be seeing you back here in a while when all the
    services and other junk frustrate the H_LL out of you and you come wandering
    back to 98SE.

    "RJ" wrote:

    > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
    > Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are my
    > best bets? Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    > full featured version? Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    > to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch. Also, I
    > see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
    > the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    >
    > Anyway, trying to sort thru my installation concerns and purchase options
    > (seem to be as many of those as Carter has pills). I don't mind saving
    > money, but I'd also like to be legal in the process.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Rob
    >
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    So in reality, Ken Blake, the only reason for the full version to me is for
    convience and the ease of a full install that does not have the garbage that
    is constantly spewed out over the Internet through adware, spyware, viruses,
    trojans and other baddies. It also saves time and time is money to me
    because life is passing away too quickly.

    "Ken Blake" wrote:

    > In news:Neb8e.7750$sp3.6092@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net,
    > RJ <jackson@aol.com> typed:
    >
    > > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate
    > > to
    > > WindowsXP Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this
    > > transistion, what are my best bets? Can I buy the upgrade
    > > version,
    >
    >
    > Yes.
    >
    >
    > > or can I also upgrade using a full featured version?
    >
    >
    > The Full (retail) version can also do an upgrade. However it
    > costs more and contains exactly the same software as the Upgrade
    > version; only the installation routine and the rules for using it
    > differ (to do a clean installation with the upgrade version you
    > have to have a CD of a previous qualifying version). So if you
    > qualify to use the Upgrade version, buying the Full version would
    > be a waste of money.
    >
    >
    > > Or does the
    > > full featured version mean I will have to pretty much wipe out
    > > my
    > > harddrive and then start from scratch.
    >
    >
    > No. It will do either a clean installation or an upgrade.
    >
    >
    > > Also, I see many folks
    > > selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
    > > the COE
    > > required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    >
    >
    > You mean COA, not COE. If it comes without a COA, it's not a
    > legal version.
    >
    > Note that it requires activation, not registration. Registration
    > is always completely optional. But you have to activate within 30
    > days of installation or it will cease to function except in safe
    > mode.
    >
    > Note that the OEM version will *not* do an upgrade, just a clean
    > installation. Its license also ties it to the first machine it's
    > installed on, and it can never legally be sold, given away, or
    > moved to another machine. For that reason, and because it costs
    > only slightly less than an Upgrade version, I think it's a much
    > poorer deal.
    >
    >
    > > Anyway, trying to sort thru my installation concerns and
    > > purchase
    > > options (seem to be as many of those as Carter has pills). I
    > > don't
    > > mind saving money, but I'd also like to be legal in the
    > > process.
    >
    >
    > Clearly, you should buy an Upgrade version.
    >
    > --
    > Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    > Please reply to the newsgroup
    >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Yes, in my opinion, a clean installation is the only way to go and that is
    why I like Full Retail copies and also see my comments to Ken Blake.

    "Bruce Chambers" wrote:

    > RJ wrote:
    > > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
    > > Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are my
    > > best bets?
    >
    >
    > Some people will recommend that you perform a clean installation,
    > rather than upgrade over an earlier OS. For the most part, I feel that
    > these people, while well-meaning, are living in the past, and are basing
    > their recommendation on their experiences with older operating systems.
    > You'd probably save a lot of time by upgrading your PC to WinXP,
    > rather than performing a clean installation, if you've no hardware or
    > software incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved (over earlier
    > versions of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly upgrade an earlier OS.
    >
    > WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
    > system while simultaneously preserving your applications and data, and
    > translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
    > designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things can
    > go wrong, in a small number of cases. If your data is at all important
    > to you, back it up before proceeding. And if, for some reason, the
    > upgrade doesn't pan out, you can always perform a clean installation later.
    >
    > Have you made sure that your PC's hardware components are capable
    > of supporting WinXP? This information will be found at the PC's
    > manufacturer's web site, and on Microsoft's Windows Catalog:
    > (http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx) Additionally, run
    > Microsoft WinXP Upgrade Advisor to see if you have any incompatible
    > hardware components or applications.
    >
    > You should, before proceeding, take a few minutes to ensure that
    > there are WinXP device drivers available for all of the machine's
    > components. There may not be, if the PC was specifically designed for
    > Win98/Me. Also bear in mind that PCs designed for, sold and run fine
    > with Win9x/Me very often do not meet WinXP's much more stringent
    > hardware quality requirements. This is particularly true of many models
    > in Compaq's consumer-class Presario product line or HP's consumer-class
    > Pavilion product line. WinXP, like WinNT and Win2K before it, is quite
    > sensitive to borderline defective or substandard hardware (particularly
    > motherboards, RAM and hard drives) that will still support Win9x.
    >
    > HOW TO Prepare to Upgrade Win98 or WinMe
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q316639
    >
    > Upgrading to Windows XP
    > http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpupgrad.htm
    >
    >
    > > Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    > > full featured version?
    >
    >
    > You can perform an upgrade from Win98 using either the WinXP Pro
    > Upgrade or the WinXP Pro Full Retail versions. It's even possible,
    > should it ever become necessary or desirable at some future time, to
    > perform a clean installation using the Upgrade CD. (The Upgrade CD
    > checks to see if a qualifying OS is installed, and, if it finds none,
    > asks you to insert the installation media (CD) of that earlier OS.
    > Unfortunately, an OEM "Recovery/Restore" CD will not work for this
    > purpose; you must have a true installation CD, complete with the
    > "\Win98" folder and *.cab files.) That being the case, the more
    > economical option would be to purchase an Upgrade license.
    >
    >
    > > Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    > > to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch.
    >
    >
    > Not unless you elect to further cut costs by purchasing an OEM license.
    > There are some very important reasons that an OEM license costs so
    > much less than a retail license. OEM licenses are very limited:
    >
    > 1) OEM versions must be sold with a piece of non-peripheral
    > hardware (normally a motherboard or hard drive, if not an entire PC,
    > although Microsoft has greatly relaxed the hardware criteria for WinXP)
    > and are _permanently_ bound to the first PC on which they are installed.
    > An OEM license, once installed, is not legally transferable to another
    > computer under any circumstances. This is the main reason some people
    > avoid OEM versions; if the PC dies or is otherwise disposed of (even
    > stolen), you cannot re-use your OEM license on a new PC. The only
    > legitimate way to transfer the ownership of an OEM license is to
    > transfer ownership of the entire PC.
    >
    > 2) Microsoft provides no free support for OEM versions. If you
    > have any problems that require outside assistance, your only recourse is
    > to contact the manufacturer/builder of the PC or the seller of the OEM
    > license. This would include such issues as lost a Product Key or
    > replacing a damaged installation CD. (Microsoft does some make
    > allowances for those instances when you can prove that the OEM has gone
    > out of business.) This doesn't mean that you can't download patches and
    > service packs from Microsoft -- just no free telephone or email support
    > for problems with the OS.
    >
    > 3) An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an earlier
    > OS, as it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty hard drive.
    > It can still be used to perform a repair installation (a.k.a. an
    > in-place upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.
    >
    > 4) If the OEM CD was designed by a specific manufacturer, such as
    > eMachines, Sony, Dell, Gateway, etc., it will most likely only install
    > on the same brand of PC, as an additional anti-piracy feature. Further,
    > such CDs are severely customized to contain only the minimum of device
    > drivers, and a lot of extra nonsense, that the manufacturer feels
    > necessary for the specific model of PC for which the CD was designed.
    > (To be honest, such CDs should _not_ be available on the open market;
    > but, if you're shopping someplace on-line like eBay, swap meets, or
    > computer fairs, there's often no telling what you're buying until it's
    > too late.) The "generic" OEM CDs, such as are manufactured by Microsoft
    > and sold to small systems builders, don't have this particular problem,
    > though, and are pretty much the same as their retail counterparts, apart
    > from the licensing, support, and upgrading restrictions.
    >
    >
    >
    > > Also, I
    > > see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
    > > the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    > >
    >
    >
    > Correct, in essence, although it's "Activation" that's required;
    > registration is entirely optional. If you see someone selling an OEM CD
    > without the CoA and Product Key, all they're really selling is a rather
    > over-priced, non-absorbent coaster. No CoA and Product Key = No
    > License. The CD by itself is useless. If you're shopping on eBay, be
    > very careful, as eBay makes no prior effort to ensure that such sales
    > are legitimate; they react only when someone files a complaint. (And
    > then all that really happens is the seller of the pirated software
    > returns using a different alias, to continue selling illegitimate copies.)
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    >
    > Bruce Chambers
    >
    > Help us help you:
    > http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    > http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    >
    > You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    > both at once. - RAH
    >
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    What about Windows Virtual Machine. I have read about it and it sounds
    really intriguing but I have not tried it. Does it really work as
    advertised, MVP's? <???>

    "BAR" wrote:

    > Given Bruce's extensive material regarding the 'caveats' of upgrading etc etc
    > etc etc.
    >
    > The basic answer to your question is:
    >
    > 1. You can purchase a full retail version of XP and install it over the top
    > of your 98 and not loose any applications or files [subject to caveats and
    > etcs as in the bible of Bruce]. There are 2 versions - XP Pro [most money]
    > or XP Home [less money]
    >
    > 2. You qualify to use a Windows XP Pro Upgrade version [less money than
    > either of 1.] and install it as an upgrade to your 98 and not loose any
    > applications or files. It runs under 98 [just as any other application
    > installation would - but also provides an option to check for compatibility
    > etc - as Bruce says: run this to be safe].
    >
    > 3. You may also qualify to use a Windows XP Upgarde Academic Edition [least
    > expensive option of all] and install it as an upgrade to your 98 and not
    > loose any applications or files. It runs under 98 [just as any other
    > application installation would - but also provides an option to check for
    > compatibility etc - as Bruce says: run this to be safe]. This is effectively
    > the same as 2 but has a price advantage for the academic community or members
    > / participants thereof.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > "Bruce Chambers" wrote:
    >
    > > RJ wrote:
    > > > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
    > > > Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are my
    > > > best bets?
    > >
    > >
    > > Some people will recommend that you perform a clean installation,
    > > rather than upgrade over an earlier OS. For the most part, I feel that
    > > these people, while well-meaning, are living in the past, and are basing
    > > their recommendation on their experiences with older operating systems.
    > > You'd probably save a lot of time by upgrading your PC to WinXP,
    > > rather than performing a clean installation, if you've no hardware or
    > > software incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved (over earlier
    > > versions of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly upgrade an earlier OS.
    > >
    > > WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing operating
    > > system while simultaneously preserving your applications and data, and
    > > translating as many personalized settings as possible. The process is
    > > designed to be, and normally is, quite painless. That said, things can
    > > go wrong, in a small number of cases. If your data is at all important
    > > to you, back it up before proceeding. And if, for some reason, the
    > > upgrade doesn't pan out, you can always perform a clean installation later.
    > >
    > > Have you made sure that your PC's hardware components are capable
    > > of supporting WinXP? This information will be found at the PC's
    > > manufacturer's web site, and on Microsoft's Windows Catalog:
    > > (http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx) Additionally, run
    > > Microsoft WinXP Upgrade Advisor to see if you have any incompatible
    > > hardware components or applications.
    > >
    > > You should, before proceeding, take a few minutes to ensure that
    > > there are WinXP device drivers available for all of the machine's
    > > components. There may not be, if the PC was specifically designed for
    > > Win98/Me. Also bear in mind that PCs designed for, sold and run fine
    > > with Win9x/Me very often do not meet WinXP's much more stringent
    > > hardware quality requirements. This is particularly true of many models
    > > in Compaq's consumer-class Presario product line or HP's consumer-class
    > > Pavilion product line. WinXP, like WinNT and Win2K before it, is quite
    > > sensitive to borderline defective or substandard hardware (particularly
    > > motherboards, RAM and hard drives) that will still support Win9x.
    > >
    > > HOW TO Prepare to Upgrade Win98 or WinMe
    > > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q316639
    > >
    > > Upgrading to Windows XP
    > > http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpupgrad.htm
    > >
    > >
    > > > Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    > > > full featured version?
    > >
    > >
    > > You can perform an upgrade from Win98 using either the WinXP Pro
    > > Upgrade or the WinXP Pro Full Retail versions. It's even possible,
    > > should it ever become necessary or desirable at some future time, to
    > > perform a clean installation using the Upgrade CD. (The Upgrade CD
    > > checks to see if a qualifying OS is installed, and, if it finds none,
    > > asks you to insert the installation media (CD) of that earlier OS.
    > > Unfortunately, an OEM "Recovery/Restore" CD will not work for this
    > > purpose; you must have a true installation CD, complete with the
    > > "\Win98" folder and *.cab files.) That being the case, the more
    > > economical option would be to purchase an Upgrade license.
    > >
    > >
    > > > Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    > > > to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch.
    > >
    > >
    > > Not unless you elect to further cut costs by purchasing an OEM license.
    > > There are some very important reasons that an OEM license costs so
    > > much less than a retail license. OEM licenses are very limited:
    > >
    > > 1) OEM versions must be sold with a piece of non-peripheral
    > > hardware (normally a motherboard or hard drive, if not an entire PC,
    > > although Microsoft has greatly relaxed the hardware criteria for WinXP)
    > > and are _permanently_ bound to the first PC on which they are installed.
    > > An OEM license, once installed, is not legally transferable to another
    > > computer under any circumstances. This is the main reason some people
    > > avoid OEM versions; if the PC dies or is otherwise disposed of (even
    > > stolen), you cannot re-use your OEM license on a new PC. The only
    > > legitimate way to transfer the ownership of an OEM license is to
    > > transfer ownership of the entire PC.
    > >
    > > 2) Microsoft provides no free support for OEM versions. If you
    > > have any problems that require outside assistance, your only recourse is
    > > to contact the manufacturer/builder of the PC or the seller of the OEM
    > > license. This would include such issues as lost a Product Key or
    > > replacing a damaged installation CD. (Microsoft does some make
    > > allowances for those instances when you can prove that the OEM has gone
    > > out of business.) This doesn't mean that you can't download patches and
    > > service packs from Microsoft -- just no free telephone or email support
    > > for problems with the OS.
    > >
    > > 3) An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an earlier
    > > OS, as it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty hard drive.
    > > It can still be used to perform a repair installation (a.k.a. an
    > > in-place upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.
    > >
    > > 4) If the OEM CD was designed by a specific manufacturer, such as
    > > eMachines, Sony, Dell, Gateway, etc., it will most likely only install
    > > on the same brand of PC, as an additional anti-piracy feature. Further,
    > > such CDs are severely customized to contain only the minimum of device
    > > drivers, and a lot of extra nonsense, that the manufacturer feels
    > > necessary for the specific model of PC for which the CD was designed.
    > > (To be honest, such CDs should _not_ be available on the open market;
    > > but, if you're shopping someplace on-line like eBay, swap meets, or
    > > computer fairs, there's often no telling what you're buying until it's
    > > too late.) The "generic" OEM CDs, such as are manufactured by Microsoft
    > > and sold to small systems builders, don't have this particular problem,
    > > though, and are pretty much the same as their retail counterparts, apart
    > > from the licensing, support, and upgrading restrictions.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > > Also, I
    > > > see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
    > > > the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > > > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    > > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Correct, in essence, although it's "Activation" that's required;
    > > registration is entirely optional. If you see someone selling an OEM CD
    > > without the CoA and Product Key, all they're really selling is a rather
    > > over-priced, non-absorbent coaster. No CoA and Product Key = No
    > > License. The CD by itself is useless. If you're shopping on eBay, be
    > > very careful, as eBay makes no prior effort to ensure that such sales
    > > are legitimate; they react only when someone files a complaint. (And
    > > then all that really happens is the seller of the pirated software
    > > returns using a different alias, to continue selling illegitimate copies.)
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > --
    > >
    > > Bruce Chambers
    > >
    > > Help us help you:
    > > http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    > > http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    > >
    > > You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    > > both at once. - RAH
    > >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Exactly, OEM (Original Equipment Machine) as compared to Retail version (the
    best choice for full Microsoft support)

    Remember, Microsoft is Closed source except in the fact that parts of NT
    (Not There aka New Technology) have leaked over the Internet and this makes
    XP PRO. SP2 even less secure than 98SE behind ZA PRO. with antivirus and with
    Webroot's Spysweeper in my opinion. Remember my XP PRO. SP2 was hacked and I
    got a hit from the government of China that was 17,850 and above a 1,000 is a
    hack -- my PC with confidential source code testing for the U.S. federal
    government and for Microsoft currently resides unplugged on the floor due to
    hightened security alerts from hackers that have hacked into and continue to
    hack into companies to steal information and due to the theft of my social
    security card with my social security number on it. Have a nice day!

    "Harry Ohrn" wrote:

    > You cannot upgrade using an OEM version. It simply will not work. You can
    > upgrade using either an upgrade version or a full retail version. Check here
    > for some basic tips that can ease the upgrade
    > http://www.webtree.ca/windowsxp/upgrade_tips.htm
    >
    > --
    >
    > Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
    > www.webtree.ca/windowsxp
    >
    >
    > "RJ" <jackson@aol.com> wrote in message
    > news:Neb8e.7750$sp3.6092@newsread3.news.atl.earthlink.net...
    > > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
    > > Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are
    > my
    > > best bets? Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    > > full featured version? Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    > > to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch. Also, I
    > > see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the
    > COE....isn't
    > > the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    > >
    > > Anyway, trying to sort thru my installation concerns and purchase options
    > > (seem to be as many of those as Carter has pills). I don't mind saving
    > > money, but I'd also like to be legal in the process.
    > >
    > > TIA,
    > >
    > > Rob
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    In news:6D9FF8E3-CA99-46C4-8C62-7BA3D1684427@microsoft.com,
    Dan <Dan@discussions.microsoft.com> typed:

    > Yes, in my opinion, a clean installation is the only way to go


    You are welcome to that opinion. As you know I completely
    disagree with it, as do many others whose opinions I respect.


    > and
    > that is why I like Full Retail copies


    But regardless of whether you prefer clean installations or
    upgrades, buying a Full version when you qualify for an Upgrade
    is simply a substantial waste of money. As I said in the other
    message in this thread to which you responded, you *can* do a
    clean installation with with the Upgrade version; the requirement
    is to *own* a previous qualifying version, not necessarily to
    have it installed. The Upgrade version contains exactly the same
    software as the Full version; only the installation routine and
    the rules for using it differ (to do a clean installation with
    the upgrade version you have to have a CD of a previous
    qualifying version).

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup


    > and also see my comments to Ken
    > Blake.
    >
    > "Bruce Chambers" wrote:
    >
    >> RJ wrote:
    >>> I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate
    >>> to
    >>> WindowsXP Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this
    >>> transistion, what are my best bets?
    >>
    >>
    >> Some people will recommend that you perform a clean
    >> installation, rather than upgrade over an earlier OS. For the
    >> most
    >> part, I feel that these people, while well-meaning, are living
    >> in
    >> the past, and are basing their recommendation on their
    >> experiences
    >> with older operating systems. You'd probably save a lot of
    >> time by
    >> upgrading your PC to WinXP,
    >> rather than performing a clean installation, if you've no
    >> hardware or
    >> software incompatibilities. Microsoft has greatly improved
    >> (over
    >> earlier versions of Windows) WinXP's ability to smoothly
    >> upgrade an
    >> earlier OS.
    >>
    >> WinXP is designed to install and upgrade the existing
    >> operating
    >> system while simultaneously preserving your applications and
    >> data,
    >> and translating as many personalized settings as possible.
    >> The
    >> process is designed to be, and normally is, quite painless.
    >> That
    >> said, things can
    >> go wrong, in a small number of cases. If your data is at all
    >> important
    >> to you, back it up before proceeding. And if, for some
    >> reason, the
    >> upgrade doesn't pan out, you can always perform a clean
    >> installation
    >> later.
    >>
    >> Have you made sure that your PC's hardware components are
    >> capable
    >> of supporting WinXP? This information will be found at the
    >> PC's
    >> manufacturer's web site, and on Microsoft's Windows Catalog:
    >> (http://www.microsoft.com/whdc/hcl/default.mspx)
    >> Additionally, run
    >> Microsoft WinXP Upgrade Advisor to see if you have any
    >> incompatible
    >> hardware components or applications.
    >>
    >> You should, before proceeding, take a few minutes to
    >> ensure that
    >> there are WinXP device drivers available for all of the
    >> machine's
    >> components. There may not be, if the PC was specifically
    >> designed
    >> for Win98/Me. Also bear in mind that PCs designed for, sold
    >> and run
    >> fine
    >> with Win9x/Me very often do not meet WinXP's much more
    >> stringent
    >> hardware quality requirements. This is particularly true of
    >> many
    >> models in Compaq's consumer-class Presario product line or
    >> HP's
    >> consumer-class Pavilion product line. WinXP, like WinNT and
    >> Win2K
    >> before it, is quite sensitive to borderline defective or
    >> substandard
    >> hardware (particularly motherboards, RAM and hard drives) that
    >> will
    >> still support Win9x.
    >>
    >> HOW TO Prepare to Upgrade Win98 or WinMe
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;Q316639
    >>
    >> Upgrading to Windows XP
    >> http://aumha.org/win5/a/xpupgrad.htm
    >>
    >>
    >>> Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    >>> full featured version?
    >>
    >>
    >> You can perform an upgrade from Win98 using either the WinXP
    >> Pro
    >> Upgrade or the WinXP Pro Full Retail versions. It's even
    >> possible,
    >> should it ever become necessary or desirable at some future
    >> time, to
    >> perform a clean installation using the Upgrade CD. (The
    >> Upgrade CD
    >> checks to see if a qualifying OS is installed, and, if it
    >> finds none,
    >> asks you to insert the installation media (CD) of that earlier
    >> OS.
    >> Unfortunately, an OEM "Recovery/Restore" CD will not work for
    >> this
    >> purpose; you must have a true installation CD, complete with
    >> the
    >> "\Win98" folder and *.cab files.) That being the case, the
    >> more
    >> economical option would be to purchase an Upgrade license.
    >>
    >>
    >>> Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    >>> to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from
    >>> scratch.
    >>
    >>
    >> Not unless you elect to further cut costs by purchasing an OEM
    >> license. There are some very important reasons that an OEM
    >> license
    >> costs so
    >> much less than a retail license. OEM licenses are very
    >> limited:
    >>
    >> 1) OEM versions must be sold with a piece of
    >> non-peripheral
    >> hardware (normally a motherboard or hard drive, if not an
    >> entire PC,
    >> although Microsoft has greatly relaxed the hardware criteria
    >> for
    >> WinXP) and are _permanently_ bound to the first PC on which
    >> they are
    >> installed. An OEM license, once installed, is not legally
    >> transferable to another computer under any circumstances.
    >> This is
    >> the main reason some people avoid OEM versions; if the PC dies
    >> or is
    >> otherwise disposed of (even stolen), you cannot re-use your
    >> OEM
    >> license on a new PC. The only legitimate way to transfer the
    >> ownership of an OEM license is to
    >> transfer ownership of the entire PC.
    >>
    >> 2) Microsoft provides no free support for OEM versions.
    >> If you
    >> have any problems that require outside assistance, your only
    >> recourse is to contact the manufacturer/builder of the PC or
    >> the
    >> seller of the OEM license. This would include such issues as
    >> lost a
    >> Product Key or replacing a damaged installation CD. (Microsoft
    >> does
    >> some make
    >> allowances for those instances when you can prove that the OEM
    >> has
    >> gone out of business.) This doesn't mean that you can't
    >> download
    >> patches and service packs from Microsoft -- just no free
    >> telephone
    >> or email support for problems with the OS.
    >>
    >> 3) An OEM CD cannot be used to perform an upgrade of an
    >> earlier
    >> OS, as it was designed to be installed _only_ upon an empty
    >> hard
    >> drive. It can still be used to perform a repair installation
    >> (a.k.a. an
    >> in-place upgrade) of an existing WinXP installation.
    >>
    >> 4) If the OEM CD was designed by a specific
    >> manufacturer, such
    >> as eMachines, Sony, Dell, Gateway, etc., it will most likely
    >> only
    >> install
    >> on the same brand of PC, as an additional anti-piracy feature.
    >> Further, such CDs are severely customized to contain only the
    >> minimum of device drivers, and a lot of extra nonsense, that
    >> the
    >> manufacturer feels necessary for the specific model of PC for
    >> which
    >> the CD was designed. (To be honest, such CDs should _not_ be
    >> available on the open market;
    >> but, if you're shopping someplace on-line like eBay, swap
    >> meets, or
    >> computer fairs, there's often no telling what you're buying
    >> until
    >> it's
    >> too late.) The "generic" OEM CDs, such as are manufactured by
    >> Microsoft and sold to small systems builders, don't have this
    >> particular problem, though, and are pretty much the same as
    >> their
    >> retail counterparts, apart from the licensing, support, and
    >> upgrading restrictions.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> Also, I
    >>> see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without
    >>> the
    >>> COE....isn't the COE required before the program will be able
    >>> to be
    >>> registered, and doesn't XP require registration before it
    >>> will
    >>> function?
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >> Correct, in essence, although it's "Activation" that's
    >> required;
    >> registration is entirely optional. If you see someone selling
    >> an
    >> OEM CD without the CoA and Product Key, all they're really
    >> selling
    >> is a rather over-priced, non-absorbent coaster. No CoA and
    >> Product
    >> Key = No
    >> License. The CD by itself is useless. If you're shopping on
    >> eBay,
    >> be very careful, as eBay makes no prior effort to ensure that
    >> such
    >> sales
    >> are legitimate; they react only when someone files a
    >> complaint. (And
    >> then all that really happens is the seller of the pirated
    >> software
    >> returns using a different alias, to continue selling
    >> illegitimate
    >> copies.)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Bruce Chambers
    >>
    >> Help us help you:
    >> http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    >> http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html
    >>
    >> You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count
    >> on
    >> having both at once. - RAH
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    Dan wrote:
    > Yes, in my opinion, a clean installation is the only way to go and that is
    > why I like Full Retail copies and also see my comments to Ken Blake.
    >


    You mean the one that made absolutely no sense? It didn't even seem
    relevant to the discussion at hand, as your having deliberately
    installed adware and spyware has *nothing* to do with whether or not the
    OS was installed via upgrade or clean installation.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion,microsoft.public.win98.setup,microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general (More info?)

    "RJ" wrote:

    > I have a registered copy of Win98SE and would like to migrate to WindowsXP
    > Pro. If I want to minimize the effort to make this transistion, what are my
    > best bets? Can I buy the upgrade version, or can I also upgrade using a
    > full featured version? Or does the full featured version mean I will have
    > to pretty much wipe out my harddrive and then start from scratch. Also, I
    > see many folks selling OEM versions, versus with or without the COE....isn't
    > the COE required before the program will be able to be registered, and
    > doesn't XP require registration before it will function?
    >
    > Anyway, trying to sort thru my installation concerns and purchase options
    > (seem to be as many of those as Carter has pills). I don't mind saving
    > money, but I'd also like to be legal in the process.
    >
    > TIA,
    >
    > Rob
    >
    >
    > Dont Worry you can upgrade .. but do a new install.. don't format drive install in the same partition. if that is a 32bit partition
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